Friday, July 31, 2015

"Millennial Men Aren’t the Dads They Thought They’d Be"

From the NYT Upshot: 

Young men today have aspirations of being hands-on fathers as well as breadwinners — supportive husbands who also do dishes.

But as they enter that more responsibility-filled stage of life, something changes: Their roles often become much more traditional.

Millennial men — ages 18 to early 30s — have much more egalitarian attitudes about family, career and gender roles inside marriage than generations before them, according to a variety of research by social scientists. Yet they struggle to achieve their goals once they start families, researchers say. Some researchers think that’s because workplace policies have not caught up to changing expectations at home.

July 31, 2015 in Family, Manliness, Masculinities | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, July 29, 2015

Fathers Discriminated by Citizenship Law

Unfortunate that I had missed this story earlier this month: 

A U.S. law that treats mothers and fathers differently in determining whether their foreign-born children may claim U.S. citizenship is unconstitutional, a federal appeals court ruled on Wednesday, four years after the U.S. Supreme Court split 4-4 on the issue.

The 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in New York said the statute applied "impermissible stereotyping" in imposing a tougher burden on fathers.

The law requires unwed fathers who are U.S. citizens to spend at least five years living in the United States - a 2012 amendment reduced it from 10 years - before they can confer citizenship onto a child born abroad, out of wedlock and to a partner who is not a U.S. citizen. For unwed U.S. mothers in the same situation, the requirement is only one year.

Wednesday's ruling is likely to have a limited effect in terms of the number of people it applies to, but the decision addresses important principles regarding ‎laws that explicitly treat the sexes differently, legal advocates said.

**the story continues here.  

July 29, 2015 in Family, International, Manliness, Masculinities | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, July 24, 2015

Exaggeration as manly trope

A recent study at the U of Washington confirms what every guy knows: men exaggerate about how great they are.  All men do this, I suspect, to varying degree.  

If a man feels like his masculinity is being questioned he is more likely to lie about his physical and mental traits.

Researchers have found that men will overcompensate by lying about their height, how athletic or they are and how many relationships they have had in order live up to the male stereotype.

In contrast, men who don’t feel threatened are more honest when quizzed about their physical appearance or past.

And:

Male students at Stanford University were told they were participating in research on how exertion impacts decision-making and were asked to squeeze a handheld device with each hand.

Researchers marked their scores on sheets that showed fake results, representing 'typical' male and female results.

Participants were scored either in the middle of the female or the male curve, suggesting that their grip was either weak or average.

They were then asked to fill out a questionnaire asking about their height, number of previous relationships, various personality traits and their interest in products that skewed male or female, along with 'distracter questions' about things such as their college major.

Associate Professor Cheryan said the consistent exaggeration about height among the group who thought they scored lower was particularly surprising.

'Height is something you think would be fixed, but how tall you say you are is malleable, at least for men,' she said.

The findings, researchers said, underscore the pressure men feel to live up to gender stereotypes and the ways in which they might reinstate a threatened masculinity. 

July 24, 2015 in Manliness, Masculinities | Permalink | Comments (0)

Editorial on the Boy Scouts of America and Gay Rights

Boy Scouts marching in Seattle Pride Parade

From the LA Times, an interesting comparison with the much more open policy of the Girl Scouts.  

The Boy Scouts of America didn't go as far as it ought to have with its new recommendation on gay Scout leaders, but it did make reluctant headway. This wasn't the leap of an organization that now views sexual orientation with more tolerant eyes, but rather a shuffling step by a tradition-bound group that has been prodded by dramatic changes in societal views of sexual orientation, as well as the financial realities of needing to woo back corporate donors such as Walt Disney Co. that are reluctant to sponsor an organization that discriminates against gay people.

The resolution approved last week by the Scouts' national executive committee puts an end to the organization's official ban on gay Scout leaders and volunteers. But rather than banning such discrimination entirely, it leaves the decision up to individual troops and units. (The new policy is expected to be ratified by the executive board July 27.) Some of those troops already have shown interest in welcoming all interested and qualified adults, regardless of sexual orientation; many others are expected to keep a ban in place.

Compare that with the way the Girl Scouts recently made news: A Scouting council in western Washington rejected a $100,000 donation that came with the stipulation that it not be used to support transgender Scouts. That's in line with the organization's history. The Girl Scouts also became racially integrated much earlier than the Boy Scouts, and had little problem accepting atheist members.

July 24, 2015 in LGBT, Manliness, Masculinities | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, July 22, 2015

"White Male Bluster"

GOP's toxic white male bluster: Trump, Cruz and Christie bully to overcompensate

So reads the Salon headline for an article that assesses the public rhetoric by GOP presidential candidates.  

Chris Christie roared onto the presidential campaign stage calling out his onetime pal, President Obama, for being “weak.” He labeled the economy as “weak,” U.S. foreign policy as “weak,” and the president’s style of governance as a “handwringing” incompetence. Christie’s theme is not just his, though; it seems to dominate the Republican candidates’ critique of any Democratic leader whose approach to the larger world refrains from their over-the-top bluster. The real question, though, is what makes the Republicans think theirs is the party of strength? What lies behind their in-your-face, Clint Eastwood-style American bravado?

July 22, 2015 in Manliness, Masculinities, Media | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, July 20, 2015

The disappearance of the manly journalist?

Image for Where Have All the Manly Journalists Gone?

An amusing, and interesting, essay from the Atlantic.  

I, Elspeth Reeve, am the manliest journalist in the world. That’s not something I go around thinking about all day, but recently Mark Judge wrote a semi-viral article titled, “Where Have All the Manly Journalists Gone?” I am here to answer that question. 

Judge’s essay for Acculturated.com, “an online magazine about the virtues and vices of pop culture” with a politically conservative slant, drew some attention when he savvily tweeted it at many journalists. It is a tailored-for-Twitter version of a longstanding anxiety—ex: “THE SISSIFICATION OF AMERICA CONTINUES APACE.” Judge, who has written a book titled A Tremor of Bliss: Sex, Catholicism, and Rock 'n' Roll, wonders what happened to the burly old guys with alcohol problems who wrote about big wars: “Ernest Hemingway. Ernie Pyle. Jack London. Christopher Hitchens.” The article is illustrated with a photograph of Hemingway using a typewriter outdoors, with rugged mountains behind him, while wearing a leather vest and pomade in his hair, which clearly was not staged for his own vanity, because that would be unmanly.

In the good old days, there was an “intense physicality” to reporting, Judge writes, and “journalism was a job of grit and hard effort, like boxing.” These days, we type things on computers, like pussies.

July 20, 2015 in Manliness, Masculinities, Media, Pop Culture | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, July 15, 2015

Serena Williams and woman's body image

Serena Williams won another Wimbledon title this weekend.  She is deservedly the most accomplished athlete--of any gender--for a sport.  

Alas, there are discussions regarding her body image and what said discussions say about how we think about gender.  

From the NYT:

Despite Williams’s success — a victory Saturday would give her 21 Grand Slam singles titles and her fourth in a row — body-image issues among female tennis players persist, compelling many players to avoid bulking up.

“It’s our decision to keep her as the smallest player in the top 10,” said Tomasz Wiktorowski, the coach of Agnieszka Radwanska, who is listed at 5 feet 8 and 123 pounds. “Because, first of all she’s a woman, and she wants to be a woman.”

For many, perceived ideal feminine body type can seem at odds with the best physique for tennis success. Andrea Petkovic, a German ranked 14th, said she particularly loathed seeing pictures of herself hitting two-handed backhands, when her arm muscles appear the most bulging.

“I just feel unfeminine,” she said. “I don’t know — it’s probably that I’m self-conscious about what people might say. It’s stupid, but it’s insecurities that every woman has, I think. I definitely have them and I’m not ashamed to admit it. I would love to be a confident player that is proud of her body. Women, when we grow up we’ve been judged more, our physicality is judged more, and it makes us self-conscious.”

July 15, 2015 in Manliness, Masculinities, Pop Culture, Sports | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, July 13, 2015

White women and racist violence

A bit dated by cyberspace terms but still worth reading from the New Republic: 

We cannot talk about the violence that Dylann Roof perpetrated at Emanuel AME last Wednesday night without talking about whiteness, and specifically, about white womanhood and its role in racist violence. We have to talk about those things, because Roof himself did. Per a witness account, we know that he said: “You rape our women and you’re taking over our country.” “Our” women, by whom he meant white women.

There is a centuries-old notion that white men must defend, with lethal violence at times, the sexual purity of white women from allegedly predatory black men. And, as we saw yet again after this shooting, it is not merely a relic of America’s hideous racial past. American racism is always gendered; racism and sexism are mutually dependent, and cannot be unstitched.

July 13, 2015 in Manliness, Masculinities, Race, Violence Against Women | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, July 10, 2015

Manliness in contemporary country music

South Carolina's decision to take down the Confederate Flag reminded me of the flag's symbolic associations with rural masculinity.  

Which got me thinking about country music.  Which got me thinking about contemporary country music.  Yes, music, and not law, but to the extent popular culture informs and influences law, I wanted to share some excerpts from this essay from the New Republic: 

Contemporary country masculinity is all about working hard, drinking harder, and doubling down on the kind of old-fashioned manliness that is now rejected—or that is seen to be rejected—by hipsters, nouveau bros, metrosexuals, and myriad other manifestations of the decline of manhood. It’s a deeply reactionary vision of masculinity, rooted in class, race, and a desire to define oneself as not a woman and as definitely, absolutely, supremely heterosexual.

They hate their jobs, unless they work on a farm, in which case they revere their work—for its symbolism, for its inherent and authentic goodness—even though it’s hard. With the extolling of small-town values and the rhapsodic waxing about dirt roads comes the class-conscious assumption that work is a paycheck, not a path to self-actualization. Men in country work hard, but they’d clock out for good at the end of today’s shift if they could.

And when they clock out, they drink. A lot

The third component of the masculinity espoused by bro country is straightness. Super straightness. 

In sum: 

This is what masculinity looks like in country today: work hard in a “real” job, blow off steam drinking and ogling women with your boys, then demonstrate your heterosexuality by picking one of them up. As Noah Berlatsky wrote in this magazine earlier this year, the male gaze has become central to the genre’s authenticity. “To be normal, to be real, to be rural, to be unaffected on country radio … You just have to be a guy who likes staring at women.”

Such impressions, if accurate, would suggest that contemporary country music isn't especially charmed by the picture of masculinity presented, generations earlier, by the likes of Johnny Cash, George Jones and Willie Nelson: the subtlety, the irony, and the episodes of witty paradox, often mixed with wry home-truths that sounded like nuggets of wisdom about what it meant to be a man.  

July 10, 2015 in Manliness, Masculinities | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, July 8, 2015

79 percent of elected prosecutors are white men

From the Guardian UK: 

White Americans make up 95% of elected prosecutors across the US, according to a study that cites the non-indictments of white police officers in the high-profile deaths of unarmed black men as the “shocking” reality of a disproportionate and non-diverse criminal justice system that relies on prosecutorial power.

The study, from the San Francisco-based Women’s Donor Network, also found that that just 17% of elected prosecutors in the US are women – and just 1% are women of color.

The combination of these racial and gender disparities means that white men, who represent 31% of the population, hold 79% of the 2,437 elected prosecutors in the country at a time when growing attention to issues of misrepresentation in the criminal justice system has led to calls for reform.

July 8, 2015 in Manliness, Masculinities, Race, Work/life, Workplace | Permalink | Comments (0)

Manning Up and Overcompensation

A group of psychologists have published a paper about a social axiom whose substance, I suspect, had already been intuitively grasped by every single man without the aid of empirical research:  when a man feels that his manliness is threatened, he tends to overcompensate.    The paper's abstract: 

‘‘It seems I had to fight my whole life through. Some gal would giggle and I’d get red And some guy’d laugh and I’d bust his head, I tell ya, life ain’t easy for a boy named ‘Sue’.’’ Johnny Cash, ‘‘A Boy Named Sue (1969)’’

How do people react when one of their important social identities is threatened? In the song ‘‘A Boy Named Sue,’’ Johnny Cash tells the story of a boy with an emasculating name. Faced with this ever-present threat to his masculinity, Sue overcompensates by becoming ‘‘quick and mean’’ and fighting his ‘‘whole life through.’’ The lyrics attest to the pressure that is placed on males to be masculine and the psychological discomfort felt when masculinity is questioned (e.g., Massad, 1981). The song also suggests that rather than simply living with the threat, men actively respond to recover their masculinity. We tested two basic strategies that men might use to compensate for masculinity threats: (i) exaggerating their masculinity and (ii) avoiding stereotypically feminine preferences. We further examined whether some strategies of reestablishing a threatened identity were favored over others, and if so, why.

July 8, 2015 in Manliness, Masculinities | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, July 3, 2015

Sympathy for the gals, scorn for the boys?

Those keeping up with the Women's World Cup know the story.  For those who don't, here it is: 

It was a soccer player’s worst nightmare. With seconds left in a World Cup semifinal on Wednesday, Laura Bassett of England lunged for the ball and accidentally kicked it into her own net.

Seconds later, the whistle blew. Japan had won, 2-1, and Bassett and many other England players were left in tears. And members of the sometimes vicious British news media sharpened their pens and offered ... sympathy?

The most common word in British newspaper and website headlines on Thursday was “heartbreak,” and photos of the weeping Bassett dominated the coverage.

England Women Have Done Their Country Proud,” The Times of London wrote. Even the tabloids were gentle, with The Mail grumbling that the better team had lost: “Own Goal Gives Japan Lucky Win Over Lionesses.”

Support came from all over, including from the former American players Brandi Chastain and Landon Donovan.

The reaction to Bassett’s error was in sharp contrast to the aftermath of high-profile World Cup failures by the England men’s team over the years. In a 1998 round-of-16 game against Argentina, David Beckham kicked out at Diego Simeone and was given a red card. The ejection seemed a little harsh, but sympathy for the 23-year-old Beckham was not forthcoming after England lost the game on penalties. The Mirror’s headline was typical: “10 Heroic Lions, One Stupid Boy.”

The same thing--the own goal, as it is called in soccer--had befell Andres Escobar of Colombia in the 1994 World Cup.  Known as the "Gentleman of the Field," Escobar was publicly ridiculed by his countrymen (and countrywomen) for his mistake.  Eventually, someone murdered him.  

Brazil Wcup Colombia Euphoria-1.jpg

(photo of Escobar)

 This double standard for  men versus women for what is acceptable in the realms of the masculine (like World Cup soccer) seems to me one more instance of the unique burdens shouldered by men.  

July 3, 2015 in Manliness, Masculinities, Pop Culture, Sports | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, June 17, 2015

Dolezal and Jenner

Interesting piece from the Boston Globe

Rachel Dolezal (left) and Caitlyn Jenner.

 If we accept that gender is fluid — a reflection of some inexplicable spiritual thing inside of us — why not race? Why do we police the boundaries of blackness more rigorously than we police womanhood?

The general consensus seems to be that as much as we want to do away with racial differences and as deeply as we believe in race as a social construct, we can’t accept Dolezal as a black woman trapped in a spray-tanned blonde’s body.

“Rachel Dolezal . . . may be connected to black communities and feel an affinity with the styles and cultural innovations of black people,” Alicia Walters, a black woman from Spokane wrote in The Guardian. “But the black identity cannot be put on like a pair of shoes.”

But wait a minute. I thought we just agreed that the female identity can be put on like a red mini-dress by Donna Karan. What gives? How can blackness — with all its shades and incredible diversity — be more immutable than manhood itself?

June 17, 2015 in LGBT, Manliness, Masculinities, Race | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, June 15, 2015

A Reassessment of "Goodfellas"

From the New Republic: 

"Here I am, this little kid, I can't even see over the steering wheel, and I'm parking Cadillacs," Henry Hill (Ray Liotta) says early on in Martin Scorsese's Goodfellas.  That's a good thumbnail description of Henry's obsessions, and of the film's as well. Henry wants to be a man—or more, he wants to be the man. He wants to do grown-up stuff, like park Cadillacs, tip big, have Bobby Vinton send his girl champagne, and pistol whip any guy who insults her. He wants to have the biggest balls of them all. 

Kyle Smith at the New York Post argued this week that "Women are not capable of understanding GoodFellas" because it's "a story of ball-busting etiquette" where "[t]he rule is: be a man, be tough, and always keep the party going."

And: 

But the whole point of Goodfellas is that being a man, as Henry defines it—in terms of power and ball-busting—is poisonous, violent, degrading, and stupid. 

Frankly, for me, the uber-violence isn't the problem with Martin Scorsese's movie.   It is rather that Goodfellas, unlike the superb "Sopranos," reeks with a loud and tiresome phoniness about what being a man really is.  The guys in the movie are always, and without any rest, "on."  We never see them when they are unmasculine, when they break down, when they're lost.  And all gangsters--like all men--can become like that.  That's sort of why the gangsters in Goodfellas--low life criminals with expensive tastes--became the thugs they did:  they had nothing else going for them and they knew they never would.  

Compare Scorsese's cartoonish caricatures to the gangsters in the "Sopranos":  It shows Tony being idiotic, being afraid--hell, being terrified--getting old, getting weak, and being, ultimately, so very, very lonely, as all fake men secretly are.  

June 15, 2015 in Manliness, Masculinities | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, June 14, 2015

Nobel Laureate and Prejudice in the Sciences

Tim Hunt at his home in Hertfordshire.

From the Guardian UK: 

The beleaguered British biologist Sir Tim Hunt has revealed that he was forced to resign from his post at University College London (UCL) without being given a chance to explain his controversial remarks about women in science. “I have been hung out to dry,” he told the Observer in an exclusive interview. “I have been stripped of all the things I was doing in science. I have no further influence.”

Hunt, who won the Nobel prize in 2001 for his work on cell biology, was the focus of widespread controversy last week after suggesting at a conference in Seoul that women in science were disruptive and prone to crying. He has since apologised for his remarks, which were supposed to be ironic and jocular, he said.

However, as a result of the furore, Hunt was told by UCL that he would have to resign his honorary post at the college. “At no point did they ask me for an explanation for what I said or to put it in context,” he told the Observer. “They just said I had to go. There has been an enormous rush to judgment in dealing with me.”

And for the discussion at the NYT, see here.  

June 14, 2015 in Manliness, Masculinities, Work/life, Workplace | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, June 10, 2015

"Men Adrift"

From the Economist: 

Badly educated men in rich countries have not adapted well to trade, technology or feminism.

And: 

KIMBERLEY, a receptionist in Tallulah, thinks the local men are lazy. “They don’t do nothin’,” she complains. This is not strictly true. Until recently, some of them organised dog fights in a disused school building.

Tallulah, in the Mississippi Delta, is picturesque but not prosperous. Many of the jobs it used to have are gone. Two prisons and a county jail provide work for a few guards but the men behind bars, obviously, do not have jobs. Nor do many of the young men who hang around on street corners, shooting dice and shooting the breeze. In Madison Parish, the local county, only 47% of men of prime working age (25-54) are working.

The men in Tallulah are typically not well educated: the local high school’s results are poor even by Louisiana’s standards. That would have mattered less, in the old days. A man without much book-learning could find steady work at the mill or in the fields. But the lumber mill has closed, and on nearby farms “jobs that used to take 100 men now take ten,” observes Jason McGuffie, a pastor. A strong pair of hands is no longer enough.

Tallulah may be an extreme example, but it is part of a story playing out across America and much of the rest of the rich world. In almost all societies a lot of men enjoy unwarranted advantages simply because of their sex. Much has been done over the past 50 years to put this injustice right; quite a bit still remains to be done.

The dead hand of male domination is a problem for women, for society as a whole—and for men like those of Tallulah. Their ideas of the world and their place in it are shaped by old assumptions about the special role and status due to men in the workplace and in the family, but they live in circumstances where those assumptions no longer apply. And they lack the resources of training, of imagination and of opportunity to adapt to the new demands. As a result, they miss out on a lot, both in economic terms and in personal ones.

June 10, 2015 in Manliness, Masculinities | Permalink | Comments (0)

Masculinity...out of control

Manliness is generally a term connoting virtue, as in, "the police officer displayed great manliness when he rescued the child."  Of late, we have stories of masculinity out of control.  

Image result for eric casebolt

There is the story of officer Eric Casebolt, whose angry and terrified demeanor found expression through assaults against teeangers in McKinney, Texas. 

Then there is the heartbreaking story of Kalief Browder, a young black teenager who committed suicide this week after having been brutalized in Rikers Island Prison.  He had spent three years there--without ever being convicted of a crime.  While at Rikers, Kalief was assaulted by guards, kept in solitary confinement, and beaten by gangs.  After being released from Rikers, he could no longer endure the traumatic memories.  

Kalief Browder, in July, 2014.

 

June 10, 2015 in Manliness, Masculinities | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, June 8, 2015

Phone apps and gender

Toca Robot Lab was redesigned to be less boy-focused.

From the Guardian UK: 

A growing number of children’s app makers are upping their efforts to ensure their products do a better job of reflecting the diversity of their young audiences.

And (regarding the picture above, of the robot): 

As an example, he gave Toca Robot Lab, a robot-building app that was released in 2011: a “classically boy-skewing theme of building robots” that the auditor suggested played to those stereotypes with its colour scheme and art-style of “rusty old things that you might find in a garage, as opposed to everyday things you might find at home”.

Toca Boca redesigned the game’s visuals and added in more of the latter kind of objects. “It opened it up and made it much more inclusive than it was from the beginning,” said Jeffery, who cited his company’s Toca Hair Salon range of apps as much more successful in bucking gender stereotypes.

 

June 8, 2015 in Education, Manliness, Masculinities, Technology | Permalink | Comments (0)

"Do women and men have different brains?"

From the NYT: 

Do women and men have different brains?

Back when Lawrence H. Summers was president of Harvard and suggested that they did, the reaction was swift and merciless. Pundits branded him sexist. Faculty members deemed him a troglodyte. Alumni withheld donations.

But when Bruce Jenner said much the same thing in an April interview with Diane Sawyer, he was lionized for his bravery, even for his progressivism.

“My brain is much more female than it is male,” he told her, explaining how he knew that he was transgender.

 

June 8, 2015 in Gender, Manliness, Masculinities | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, June 5, 2015

"DARPA'S Robotics Challenge Has a Gender Problem"

From WaPo: 

The tech world deservedly catches some flack for its lack of gender diversity.

For example, only 30 percent of Google’s employees are women. At Facebook31 percent are women. The number are more skewed in technical roles.

As lopsided as those numbers are, they pale in comparison to the gender breakdown at the finals of this year’s DARPA Robotics Challenge, which takes place Friday and Saturday in Pomona, Calif. Eleven of the 24 teams competing are made up completely of men. Of the 444 individuals on the teams, only 23 are women. An alarming 94.8 percent of the participants are men.

June 5, 2015 in Manliness, Masculinities, Technology | Permalink | Comments (0)