Friday, June 19, 2015

Seoul's Homophobia

Seoul, the capital of South Korea, is known for, among other things, technological innovation, the world's most efficient subway system, universities brimming with resourceful and creative minds, and, to some extent,.....its hatred against the LGBT community, a reminder of Korea's gothic remnants.    

Seoul's mayor Park Won-soon is an LGBT ally, but in 2014 he caved to pressure from conservative Christians and decided to scrap his once plan to install a city-wide human rights charter that would protect LGBT folk.  

(Left photo) Participants attend the opening ceremony of the Korea Queer Festival 2015 at Seoul Plaza in downtown Seoul on June 9, holding up cards that say “We become stronger as we connect.” Protesters, meanwhile, hold a rally opposing the event in front of Deoksugung Palace near the plaza earlier in the day. (Yonhap)

Recently, Seoul 's police department refused to permit an LGBT parade in the city.  Conservative pastors were elated.  But the city's administrative court declared the police decision unlawful, as no threat of imminent harm appeared to be presented by the parade.  Moreover, the court noted that prejudice could not serve as a motivation to block the parade.  

June 19, 2015 in LGBT | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, June 17, 2015

Dolezal and Jenner

Interesting piece from the Boston Globe

Rachel Dolezal (left) and Caitlyn Jenner.

 If we accept that gender is fluid — a reflection of some inexplicable spiritual thing inside of us — why not race? Why do we police the boundaries of blackness more rigorously than we police womanhood?

The general consensus seems to be that as much as we want to do away with racial differences and as deeply as we believe in race as a social construct, we can’t accept Dolezal as a black woman trapped in a spray-tanned blonde’s body.

“Rachel Dolezal . . . may be connected to black communities and feel an affinity with the styles and cultural innovations of black people,” Alicia Walters, a black woman from Spokane wrote in The Guardian. “But the black identity cannot be put on like a pair of shoes.”

But wait a minute. I thought we just agreed that the female identity can be put on like a red mini-dress by Donna Karan. What gives? How can blackness — with all its shades and incredible diversity — be more immutable than manhood itself?

June 17, 2015 in LGBT, Manliness, Masculinities, Race | Permalink | Comments (0)

transgender surgery at 18

From the NYT: 

In a cozy cottage decorated with butterflies to symbolize transformation, Katherine Boone was recovering in April from the operation that had changed her, in the most intimate part of her body, from a biological male into a female.

It was not easy. She retched for days afterward. She could hardly eat. She did not seem empowered; she seemed regressed.

“I just want to hold Emma,” she said in her darkened room at the bed-and-breakfast in New Hope, Pa., run by the doctor who performed the operation in a hospital nearby. Emma is her black and white cat, at her home outside Syracuse in central New York State, 250 miles away.

June 17, 2015 in LGBT | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, June 15, 2015

"Ireland Poised To Have Better Transgender Identity Law Than Most Of The World"

Who knew Ireland would the most progressive nation on earth with regard to LGBT issues? 

This month Ireland may go from not legally recognizing transgender people to having one of the best trans identity laws in the world.

Two weeks ago, the nation made history when it became thefirst country in the world to approve gay marriage by a popular vote.

Ireland may once again make history by allowing transgender people over the age of 18 to self-declare their gender on legal documents solely based on their self-determination, and without any medical intervention. The legislation is scheduled to go to committee stage on June 17.

June 15, 2015 in International, LGBT | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, June 5, 2015

"Let Transgender Troops Serve Openly"

The NYT editorial: 

Staff Sgt. Loeri Harrison could receive the paperwork any day now, forms certifying that after an exemplary eight-year Army career, she is no longer fit for duty and must leave Fort Bragg because she is transgender.

Early this year, Senior Airman Logan Ireland feared he might face a similar fate when he disclosed to his commanders during a recent deployment in Afghanistan that he transitioned from female to male. Yet, his supervisors have been supportive, allowing him to wear male uniforms and adhere to male grooming standards even though Air Force records continue to label him as female.

And: 

Defense Secretary Ashton Carter should take on what they refused to do. The current policies leave transgender troops vulnerable to discrimination that the Justice Department and the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission describe as a violation of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Medical and military experts who have studied the policies have concluded that there is no rationale for disqualifying transgender troops from serving on medical grounds.

June 5, 2015 in LGBT, Work/life, Workplace | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, June 3, 2015

Mixed Reaction to Caitlin Jenner's Coming Out

caitlyn jenner vanity fair

 

Celebrities, along with President Obama, are praising Caitlin Jenner for coming out as transgender person.  But not everyone in the transgender community is praising her.  

“Jenner’s a rich white bitch – she can pay for everything she needs. But I think she now needs to put some of that money back into the transgender community as she has taken a lot. All these years we have been abused and battered, yet she has used none of her power to help the community and bring about change.”

Thus spoke Janetta Johnson.  She continued: 

Janetta Johnson, a black trans woman who works with TGI Justice, an advocacy group for transgender prisoners and their families, said that the lack of recognition on Jenner’s part of the hard work that had gone into trying to end confusion over gender pronouns was regrettable. “For her to come out as a trans woman and say ‘Oh, please keep calling me “he”’ – I think she may have set us back.”

Johnson said she now wanted to see Jenner give back to the trans community some of what she had taken.

June 3, 2015 in LGBT, Manliness, Masculinities | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, June 1, 2015

Chinn on Gender Equality and Gay Equality

On SSRN, Stuart Chinn has uploaded "Situating 'Groups' in Constitutional Argument: Interrogating Judicial Arguments on Economic Rights, Gender Equality, and Gay Equality."  The abstract reads: 

The New Deal transformation in Commerce Clause and Due Process jurisprudence marked, among other things, a shift in judicial attention from groups defined by economic relationships to groups defined by social status. Hence, one might plausibly see judicial activism in defense of freedom of contract during the Lochner era subsequently giving way, in part, to the judicial protection of racial minorities, women, and gay persons in the decades after Brown v. Board of Education.

In this paper, I attempt to illuminate this shift in judicial attention by examining the Supreme Court's rhetoric surrounding groups in the context of the Lochner era cases on wages and hours regulations and the post-Brown v. Board of Education era cases on gender and gay equality. I situate my inquiry in the context of broader themes in American political thought, with particular attention to the core concepts and principles of American liberalism. In examining the recurrent modes of argument surrounding groups in these Supreme Court cases, I discuss how the Court's concept of groups — and how its views of American society more broadly — has varied in different constitutional doctrinal contexts.

My examination of these cases yields two key findings. The first finding speaks to a similarity across these contexts of Supreme Court jurisprudence: when confronted by reforms calling for special or different legal treatment of specific groups, both pro-reform and anti-reform Supreme Court justices in these three doctrinal contexts put forth arguments about group-sameness and group-difference. That is, group-sameness and group-difference arguments were deployed by Justices on both sides of the various legal controversies in these doctrinal areas. The second finding speaks to a difference between these doctrinal contexts: while arguments in defense of special legal treatment for groups in the Lochner era cases on wages and hours regulations were linked to larger, broader, more systemic goals, no such sensibility informs the judicial protection of groups in the post-Brown cases on gender and gay equality. Rather, in more recent years, the judicial defense of groups largely proceeds from a judicial concern for only the groups in question. Thus, we see in the more contemporary cases examples of judicial arguments about “societal segmentation” — a significant mode of legal and political argument that, I assert, has appeared episodically throughout American history. In the final Part, I set forth a more general definition of societal segmentation arguments, and I discuss how notions of segmentation may be situated in relation to the principles of American liberalism.

June 1, 2015 in Gender, LGBT, Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, May 24, 2015

Dublin Archbishop on Gay Marriage

BBC reports on surprising, and rather liberal, comments offered by the Dublin Archbishop after Ireland became the first nation to legalize gay marriage:

Diarmuid Martin, the archbishop of Dublin, said the Church in Ireland needed to reconnect with young people.

The referendum found 62% were in favour of changing the constitution to allow gay and lesbian couples to marry.

Archbishop of Dublin Diarmuid MartinThe archbishop voted 'No' in the referendum

The archbishop told the broadcaster RTE: "We [the Church] have to stop and have a reality check, not move into denial of the realities.

"We won't begin again with a sense of renewal, with a sense of denial.

"I appreciate how gay and lesbian men and women feel on this day. That they feel this is something that is enriching the way they live. I think it is a social revolution."

The archbishop personally voted "No" arguing that gay rights should be respected "without changing the definition of marriage".

"I ask myself, most of these young people who voted yes are products of our Catholic school system for 12 years. I'm saying there's a big challenge there to see how we get across the message of the Church," he added.

Ireland is the first country in the world to legalise same-sex marriage through a popular vote, and its referendum was held 22 years after homosexual acts were decriminalised in the Republic of Ireland.

 

May 24, 2015 in International, LGBT | Permalink | Comments (0)

Gay Marriage and Catholicism

Time reports:

The vote in Ireland illuminates a dynamic shift on LGBT issues among Catholics and people of faith across the globe. Today about 60% of Catholics in the United States support gay marriage, compared to about 36% a decade ago.

In fact, many who voted “yes” on gay marriage did so because of their faith, not in spite of it. One elderly Irish couple put it this way: “We are Catholics, and we are taught to believe in compassion and love and fairness and inclusion. Equality, that’s all we’re voting for.”

The idea of an inclusive Catholic Church may have seemed like a pipe dream not many years ago, but under the tenure of Francis the Troublemaker, it doesn’t seem that farfetched. Two summers ago the Pope tweeted, “Let the Church always be a place of mercy and hope, where everyone is welcomed, loved and forgiven.”

On the eve of Pentecost, it seems that Ireland has taken that message to heart and sent an unmistakable message to the Church and society at large: A community that excludes anyone is no community at all.

May 24, 2015 in LGBT | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, May 18, 2015

"Parents furious over school’s plan to teach gender spectrum, fluidity"

From Fox News:

One of the nation’s largest public school systems is preparing to include gender identity to its classroom curriculum, including lessons on sexual fluidity and spectrum – the idea that there’s no such thing as 100 percent boys or 100 percent girls.

Fairfax County Public Schools released a report recommending changes to their family life curriculum for grades 7 through 12. The changes, which critics call radical gender ideology, will be formally introduced next week.

And: 

“The larger picture is this is really an attack on nature itself – the created order,” said Peter Sprigg of the Family Research Council.

“Human beings are created male and female. But the current transgender ideology goes way beyond that. They’re telling us you can be both genders, you can be no gender, you can be a gender that you make up for yourself. And we’re supposed to affirm all of it.”

The plan calls for teaching seventh graders about transgenderism and tenth graders about the concept that sexuality is a broader spectrum --- but it sure smells like unadulterated sex indoctrination.

 

 

 

May 18, 2015 in Education, LGBT | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, May 8, 2015

Transgender in the Virginia Suburb Schools

WaPo:

For some transgender high school students in the Virginia suburbs, a school board decision Thursday could mean an end to death threats and the beginning of freedom to live openly as who they truly are.

But to some parents, adding two words to a nondiscrimination policy — “gender identity,” words intended to protect transgender students in the public schools — could be a reason to remove their children from school because of fears that allowing genders to mix in bathrooms and locker rooms could be a safety threat.

 And: 

What began in March as an effort to protect transgender students and staff in Fairfax County schools has inspired a national debate on gender identity issues for children. It has also garnered opposition from Virginia lawmakers who see the proposal as overreach by a local governing body on an issue where no state law exists.

May 8, 2015 in Education, LGBT | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, May 6, 2015

"Justice Alito’s Polygamy Perplex"

From the New Yorker: 

Juddging from Justice Samuel Alito’s contributions during Tuesday’s oral arguments in Obergefell v. Hodges, the same-sex marriage case before the Supreme Court, he is a little hung up on polygamy. Over the course of two and a half hours, he asked about little else—other than sibling marriage and the sexual relations of the ancient Greeks. 

During oral arguments over same-sex marriage, Justice Samuel Alito asked about a hypothetical relationship involving two men and two women.

May 6, 2015 in LGBT | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, April 29, 2015

Gay Marriage and the Supreme Court

Today gay marriage is obviously the big issue. And there a lot of articles and commentaries about it.

Here are a couple that I chose. The Most Awkward Moments during oral argument, discussed here.

From the NYT.  

From the Fox News. 

A commentary by Toobin in the New Yorker; he thinks the Court will decide in favor of gay marriage. 

An editorial by the conservative National Review.  

 

April 29, 2015 in Family, LGBT | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, April 27, 2015

Bruce Jenner

There are some obvious reasons not to be sympathetic to Bruce Jenner's coming out:  for one, he lives with the Kardashians; for another, the coming out looks like a publicity ploy by an aging celebrity who had milked everything once of fame for his achievements in an obscure sport called the decathlon.  

But then there was the response by his family, which was admirable:

“I am at peace with what he is and what he’s doing,” his mother, Esther Jenner, said in a separately filmed portion of the two-hour segment. “I never thought I could be more proud of Bruce when he reached his goal in 1976, but I’m more proud of him now.” Kim Kardashian tweeted, “Love is the courage to live the truest, best version of yourself. Bruce is love. I love you Bruce. #ProudDaughter.” (Jenner told Sawyer that he first came out to Kim, and that she once walked in on him in a dress.)

Seventeen-year-old Kylie Jenner, Jenner’s youngest child, tweeted, “Understandingly, this has been very hard for me. You will hear what I have to say when I’m ready to but this isn’t about me. I’m so proud of you, Dad. You are so brave. My beautiful Hero.” In this unconditional and unquestioning way, the Kardashian and Jenner clans are defining what it means to be a family today. They may be superficial, but their support for Bruce is notable for its candid demonstration of acceptance.

April 27, 2015 in LGBT, Manliness, Masculinities, Sports | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, April 17, 2015

"Pope Francis blasts ‘gender theory’ again: rejecting sexual difference is ‘a step backwards’"

From the conservative Catholic LifeSite:

ROME, April 15, 2015 (LifeSiteNews.com) – In his catechesis today, Pope Francis strongly refuted the foundational tenets of “gender theory” that forms the basis of radical feminism as well as the homosexualist political movement. The differences between men and women are not a matter of “subordination” as feminist and gender theory would have it, but of “communion and generation,” he said in his weekly General Audience at the Vatican. 

And: 

The pope wondered aloud “if so-called gender theory is not an expression of frustration and resignation, that aims to cancel out sexual difference as it is no longer able to face it. Yes, we run the risk of taking a step backwards. Indeed, the removal of difference is the problem, not the solution.”

He asked whether the current global crisis of faith, of belief in God and Christian teaching, “that is so harmful to us,” and that builds “incredulity and cynicism,” could be “connected to the crisis in the alliance between man and woman.”

 

 

 

April 17, 2015 in LGBT | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, April 13, 2015

"Obama Calls for End to ‘Conversion’ Therapies for Gay and Transgender Youth"

From the NYT: 

WASHINGTON — A 17-year-old transgender youth, Leelah Alcorn, stunned her friends and a vast Internet audience in December when she threw herself in front of a tractor-trailer after writing in an online suicide note that religious therapists had tried to convert her back to being a boy.

In response, President Obama is calling for an end to such therapies aimed at “repairing” gay, lesbian and transgender youth. His decision on the issue is the latest example of his continuing embrace of gay rights.

 

April 13, 2015 in LGBT | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, April 8, 2015

"Justice Dept.: Inmate's Gender Condition Should Be Treated"

"Prison officials must treat an inmate's gender identity condition just as they would treat any other medical or mental health condition, the Justice Department said in a court filing Friday."

The news story continues: 

"The Southern Poverty Law Center in February filed a lawsuit against Georgia Department of Corrections officials on behalf of Ashley Diamond, a transgender woman. The lawsuit says prison officials have failed to provide adequate treatment for Diamond's gender dysphoria, a condition that causes a person to experience extreme distress because of a disconnect between the birth sex and gender identity."

April 8, 2015 in LGBT | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, April 6, 2015

NASCAR Opposes Indiana's Anti-Gay Law

Statement from NASCAR on Indiana legislation

Image result for nascar

The Indiana law that ostensibly protects religious rights--while effectually permitting discrimination against gays--has provoked companies like Angie's List to pull out of Indiana.  

But you know that the law isn't popular when NASCAR--the National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing--is against it, too.  Here's the statement by NASCAR

DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. (March 31, 2015) -- "NASCAR is disappointed by the recent legislation passed in Indiana. We will not embrace nor participate in exclusion or intolerance. We are committed to diversity and inclusion within our sport and therefore will continue to welcome all competitors and fans at our events in the state of Indiana and anywhere else we race." -- NASCAR Senior Vice President and Chief Communications Officer Brett Jewkes

Whither the Indy 500?  

April 6, 2015 in LGBT, Manliness, Masculinities | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, April 3, 2015

"Justice Department Sues University in Oklahoma for Discrimination Against Transgender Professor"

From Slate:

 The Justice Department filed suit on Monday against an Oklahoma university alleging the school discriminated against a transgender professor. “Rachel Tudor was hired as a tenure-track assistant professor in the English department at Southeastern Oklahoma State University in 2004, after applying as a man with a traditionally male name, according to the lawsuit filed Monday,” the Washington Post reports. “Then in 2007, Tudor told school officials that he would become a woman during that academic year, took the name Rachel, and began wearing women’s clothes and a traditionally female hairstyle.”

And: 

“The complaint said Tudor taught in the English department and was terminatedfrom the university in 2011 after the school denied her tenure,” Reuters reports. “A lawyer for Tudor said it was the first time the university had denied an English professor's application for tenure and promotion after a favorable tenure recommendation from a promotion committee and the department chair.” The DOJ suit alleges that someone in the university’s human resources department told Tudor that the school’s vice president for academic affairs had inquired about whether Tudor could be fired because her gender transition offended his religious beliefs.

Southeastern Oklahoma State University said in a statement: “The University is confident in its legal position and its adherence to all applicable employment laws." 

 

April 3, 2015 in LGBT, Work/life, Workplace | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, April 1, 2015

Religious Freedom Laws and Gay Rights

Indiana recently passed a law that ostensibly promotes religious freedom but arguably also promotes the right of businesses to discriminate against gays.  Arkansas has followed suit with a legislative bill that does something similar.  

For discussion by the NYT, see here.  

And for a conservative defense of the Indiana law--which is interestingly couched in the technical formalities of law, rather than the cultural ideology of heterosexuality (a tacit homage to liberalism?)--check out the arguments in the National Review.  

And, for a typically droll commentary by Andy Borowitz at the New Yorker, check out this spoof (it's quite absent any snark and it's a telling commentary about the ubiquity these days of straight people having friends, colleagues, and, indeed, family members, who are gay).  

 

April 1, 2015 in LGBT, Religion | Permalink | Comments (0)