Friday, November 21, 2014

Gay Couples Banned from Homeless Shelter

From the Washington Times

Leaders of a nonprofit homeless shelter in Kansas City, Missouri, have decided not to allow legally married gay couples to stay overnight as they say it violates the group’s Christian principles.

City Union Mission debated the decision for several years but ultimately decided it must adhere to the Bible, Executive Director Dan Doty told The Kansas City Star.

“We are a Christian, faith-based organization that really does adhere to biblical standards. Our view is that it (same-sex marriage) is inappropriate,” he said.



November 21, 2014 in LGBT | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, November 19, 2014

"What Doctors Don't Know about LGBT Health"

From the Atlantic:

Medicine has not traditionally been very kind to lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people. While homosexuality was removed from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) in 1973, and was no longer considered a disorder, attempts by doctors to “treat” it persist even today. Though research and understanding of LGBT healthcare has improved in recent years, the social stigma and discrimination faced by LGBT people leads to health disparities that put them at higher risk for certain conditions. This is also the case with those who are gender non-conforming, or who are born with atypical sex anatomy (sometimes called “intersex,” though the medical term for the condition is “disorders of sex development,” or DSD).

 And: 

With all that in mind, the American Association of Medical Colleges released new guidelines earlier this week on how to improve med school curricula to better prepare young doctors to treat their LGBT, gender non-conforming, and DSD patients. Authors of the publication spanned all aspects of the medical profession, from psychiatry to genetics to clinical practice. I spoke with Kristen Eckstrand, a fourth-year medical student at Vanderbilt University, chair of the AAMC Advisory Committee on Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity, and Sex Development, and editor of the guidelines about what doctors need to know to treat their patients effectively and respectfully.

 

 

November 19, 2014 in Healthcare, LGBT | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, November 7, 2014

Children of LGBT Parents

From HuffPost:

Today, families are no longer quite so cookie cutter similar. Some families are comprised of a mother and her children and a father who is no longer an active member of the family or never has been. Other families consist of two absent parents, leaving the parental role to be fulfilled by grandparents or foster families. And there are, for the first time in history, a fair amount of same sex parents who are raising children. These types of family are a few million strong.

Despite studies proving otherwise, some people still insist that children are being ruined by this type of family dynamic. They deem homosexual couples as "unfit"parents, but don't seem to have concrete or legitimate evidence to substantiate their claims. They fight against same-sex adoption with the fervor of a quarterback at the Super Bowl.

So, what do opponents argue?

Check out the rest here.  

 

 

 

November 7, 2014 in Family, LGBT | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, October 31, 2014

"There is No Constitutional Right to Marriage ... Of Any Kind"

Or so argues one commentator. From the Jurist:  

The Constitution provides no citizen of any gender or orientation a Constitutional right to marriage. The Constitution is silent on the issue of marriage. It is not mentioned, and therefore it is not a power delegated to the federal government to regulate. For lawyers, judges and in particular, Supreme Court justices, the inquiry on this issue should end there—right where silence demands judicial inaction.

 

October 31, 2014 in LGBT, Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, October 27, 2014

North Carolinians Evenly Split Regarding Marriage Ban

The story, and the excerpt:

RALEIGH, N.C. — An exclusive WRAL News poll shows North Carolinians are evenly divided about whether legislative leaders should fight to keep the state’s same-sex marriage ban in place, despite court rulings that have found it unconstitutional.

 

 

 

 

October 27, 2014 in LGBT | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

The Anti-Gay Pam Bondi Is Leading the Polls in Florida

The Republican Pam Bondi is presently Florida's Attorney General.  She is running for reelection and she is ahead in the polls against the Democratic candidate George Sheldon.  

There are sundry differences between the two.  One stands out:  Sheldon supports the right of gay couples to marry; Bondi opposes their right--vigorously.  Here is an excerpt from her defense: 

Arguing against a lawsuit that says Florida discriminates by not recognizing gay marriages from other states, Attorney General Pam Bondi's office wrote: … disrupting Florida's existing marriage laws would impose significant public harm.

Which sure sounds like: Changing the law to allow gay marriage would hurt Florida.

And this eyebrow-raising passage: Florida's marriage laws … have a close, direct and rational relationship to society's legitimate interest in increasing the likelihood that children will be born to and raised by the mothers and fathers who produced them in stable and enduring family units.

October 22, 2014 in LGBT | Permalink | Comments (2)

Radical Feminism v. Transgenderism

 The essay is dated by cyberspace standards but it contained a story that was news to me.  In the New Yorker magazine was an arresting essay about the conflict that exists between two seeming bed fellows:  Radical Feminism and Transgenderism.  

In a piece in this week’s magazine entitled “What Is a Woman?,” Michelle Goldberg writes about an ideological dispute between two groups that might seem like natural allies: radical feminists and transgender people. It’s a conflict that dates back to the height of radical feminism, in the nineteen-seventies, and it hinges upon the two groups’ differing beliefs about who has the right to identify as a woman. On Out Loud, Goldberg joins Sasha Weiss, the literary editor of newyorker.com, and the New Yorker staff writer Margaret Talbot, to discuss the history of transgender-feminist tensions, how the language surrounding transgender issues is evolving, and the difficulty many people still have in accepting the idea of gender fluidity. Goldberg says that reconceptualizing how we think about who is a man and who is a woman is, “in some ways, a deeper challenge to people’s sense of the way the world works than, say, gay rights or gay marriage.”

October 22, 2014 in LGBT | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, October 17, 2014

When Transgender Rights Clash with Feminism

From the NYT: 

Like every other matriculating student at Wellesley, which is just west of Boston, Timothy Boatwright was raised a girl and checked “female” when he applied. Though he had told his high-school friends that he was transgender, he did not reveal that on his application, in part because his mother helped him with it, and he didn’t want her to know. Besides, he told me, “it seemed awkward to write an application essay for a women’s college on why you were not a woman.” Like many trans students, he chose a women’s college because it seemed safer physically and psychologically.

And: 

Last spring, as a sophomore, Timothy decided to run for a seat on the student-government cabinet, the highest position that an openly trans student had ever sought at Wellesley. The post he sought was multicultural affairs coordinator, or “MAC,” responsible for promoting “a culture of diversity” among students and staff and faculty members. Along with Timothy, three women of color indicated their intent to run for the seat. But when they dropped out for various unrelated reasons before the race really began, he was alone on the ballot. An anonymous lobbying effort began on Facebook, pushing students to vote “abstain.” Enough “abstains” would deny Timothy the minimum number of votes Wellesley required, forcing a new election for the seat and providing an opportunity for other candidates to come forward. The “Campaign to Abstain” argument was simple: Of all the people at a multiethnic women’s college who could hold the school’s “diversity” seat, the least fitting one was a white man.

October 17, 2014 in Education, LGBT, Manliness, Masculinities | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, October 10, 2014

Andover's GSA Is Having Their High School Conference This Weekend

Photo: GSA Pride Weekend officially starts tomorrow!!! 

Here's a comprehensive schedule of the weekend's events. We have some exciting things on the docket this year (including being joined by GSAs from other schools on Saturday), so make sure you don't miss out!

October 10, 2014 in LGBT | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, October 8, 2014

Sarasota and Transgender Folk

Several miles north of where I live, there is Sarasota, Florida.  The city council there has taken steps recently to protect transgender folk from discrimination:

SARASOTA - City commissioners voted unanimously Monday to pursue including transgender people in a list of protected classes in the city's anti-discrimination code.

A final vote will be pushed to a later date, when city staff will present an updated ordinance that makes it clear that discrimination on the basis of gender also includes gender identity and expression, said city attorney Bob Fournier.

“It's wonderful that we are at this point right now,” Commissioner Susan Atwell said before the 5-0 vote. “This inclusion for gender identity and expression gives full value and true representation to all citizens in our community.”

October 8, 2014 in LGBT | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

Could Denmark Serve as a Leader on Transgender Law?

From the Guardian UK: 

In one leap, Denmark has changed its law on trans rights, taking it from a country where transgender people were forced to undergo sterilisation in order to be legally recognised as a different gender, to one of the most progressive countries on the issue in the world.

Unlike in most of the countries that allow new gender recognition, trans people in Denmark now do not even need a medical expert statement, but can simply self-determine. There are still restrictions – the minimum age is 18, and there is a six-month waiting period before the person has to reconfirm their wish to have their gender legally changed – but the law seems to be moving in the right direction.

But: 

But Denmark's new law – which came into force on Monday – raises questions for the other European countries where forced sterilisation – either as a result of hormone treatment or surgery – is still the only route for someone transitioning to gain legal status. This requirement ignores the fact that many trans people don't want to undergo a major operation, or to irretrievably lose their fertility as a result of it, as part of their transition.

October 1, 2014 in International, LGBT | Permalink | Comments (0)

Federalism and Gay Marriage

From the Jurist: 

Advocates and opponents of same-sex marriage are breathlessly waiting for news from the Supreme Court that a marriage equality case will be heard this term. The expectation of an imminent nationwide ruling comes after scores of lower courts have declared bans on same-sex marriage unconstitutional, relying heavily on the Supreme Court's reasoning in its landmark 2013 decision, United States v. Windsor. To date only one federal ruling has broken the consensus: the September 2014 decision by Judge Martin Feldman upholding Louisiana's ban.

More: 

At this juncture, it is worth asking why Windsor, which declared a section of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) unconstitutional, has made the legal landscape so lopsided toward marriage equality. Appreciating the answer requires us to put to rest the idea that Windsor is actually a federalism decision supporting a state's right to define marriage however it wishes. As I will argue, the near unanimity among recent lower court decisions is not a product of judicial activists licking their chops at the opportunity to impose their political ideology on the nation, but rather a logical consequence of Windsor itself.

October 1, 2014 in LGBT | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, September 24, 2014

Miami Gives Early OK to Transgender Protection Law

Near my neck of the woods, and from the Miami Herald: 

Gay-rights activists prepared for a political skirmish Tuesday at Miami-Dade County Hall. They wore matching T-shirts, arrived early and filled several rows of the commission chambers in support of legislation expanding protections to transgender people.

But no one — in the audience or on the dais — showed up in opposition.

More: 

Commissioners gave unanimous — though preliminary — approval toamending the Miami-Dade’s human-rights ordinance to ban discrimination on the base of “gender identity” and “gender expression.” The law applies to public places and government services, as well as to employment and housing in the county as a whole.

“This update that we’re working on would ensure very basic protections for a very vulnerable part of our community that many take for granted,” said Charo Valero, field organizer for SAVE, Miami-Dade’s leading gay-rights organization that has been pushing for the legislative change.


 

 

September 24, 2014 in LGBT | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, September 21, 2014

Riveting Essay on Male Identity by Charles Blow

In the NYT.  An exceprt:  

I was engulfed in an irrepressible rage. Everything in me was churning and pumping and boiling. All reason and restraint were lost to it. I was about to do something I wouldn’t be able to undo. Bullets and blood and death. I gave myself over to the idea.

The scene from the night when I was 7 years old kept replaying in my mind: waking up to him pushed up behind me, his arms locked around me, my underwear down around my thighs. The weight of the guilt and grieving that followed. The years of the bullying designed to keep me from telling — and the years of questioning my role in his betrayal.

I jumped in the car, grabbed the gun from under the car seat. It was a .22 with a long black barrel and a wooden grip, the gun my mother had insisted I take with me to college, “just in case.”

September 21, 2014 in LGBT, Manliness, Masculinities | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, September 19, 2014

Philly Stumbles on Anti-Hate Law

The story here

Many people have called last week's brutal attack on two gay men in Center City a hate crime, but it can't be prosecuted as one under Pennsylvania law.

That gap in Pennsylvania's ethnic intimidation statute -- the law used to prosecute hate crimes -- has prompted calls for changes to the law and a federal hate-crime investigation.

Pennsylvania law defines ethnic-intimidation offenses as crimes motivated by "malicious intention toward the race, color, religion or national origin" of a person or group.

That means attacks based on sexual orientation aren't considered hate crimes.



September 19, 2014 in LGBT | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, September 16, 2014

Broward County and Transgender Folk

From my neck of the woods, near Ft. Lauderdale, the Sun Sentinel reports

Broward County's tourism bureau has been marketing to the LGBT community since 1996, but results of a survey released Monday show extra effort is needed to attract more transgender travelers.

In August, some 700 members of the transgender community across 48 states participated in the online survey conducted by Community Marketing & Insights, a San Francisco-based specialty marketing and research firm.

Only 10 percent of participants perceived Fort Lauderdale to be very trans-friendly, the study revealed.

September 16, 2014 in LGBT | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, September 12, 2014

Cruz on U.S. v. Windsor

David Cruz at USC Law has uploaded "Baker v. Nelson: Flotsam in the Tidal Wave of Windsor's Wake" on SSRN.  The abstract reads: 

Part I of this Article sketches the virtually unbroken string of pro-marriage decisions in the lower federal and state courts since the Supreme Court’s ruling in United States v. Windsor (2013) to give a sense of the size and magnitude of this “tidal wave” of precedent. Next, Part II briefly explores some of the reasons that might help account for the flood of litigation and overwhelmingly positive outcomes. Part III tentatively suggests one way this flow of decisions in favor of marriage equality might influence the Supreme Court when it returns to the issue. It then at some length shows one particular aspect of Windsor’s wake: the way it has helped lower federal courts unanimously and properly conclude that doctrinal developments after the Supreme Court summarily rejected a same-sex couple’s constitutional claims to a right to marry in Baker v. Nelson (1972) have rendered that decision no longer dispositive. Although Baker would in no event prevent the Supreme Court itself from revisiting the constitutional issues, the ability to declare Baker doctrinally undermined has positive repercussions for the social equality and lived reality of same-sex couples across the country in the mean time. Finally, Part IV of the Article addresses some of the ways in which United States v. Windsor itself developed constitutional doctrine in ways that advance the cause of constitutional justice and same-sex couples’ rights to equal protection and to marry.

September 12, 2014 in LGBT, Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, September 10, 2014

Was Gay Teacher Fired by Catholic School for Getting Pregnant?

From WaPo: 

For nine years, Barbara Webb, 33, taught honors chemistry and coached sports at Marian High School, a private Roman Catholic girls’ school in Bloomfield Hills, a Detroit suburb.

When she told her employer she was pregnant, she says she was given two options: resign or be fired.

Why?

Because she got pregnant “outside the Catholic way,” as she put it in a Facebook post in late August announcing her pregnancy with Kristen Lasecki, her partner of more than five years. In same post, she announced the news of her dismissal.

In August, the school offered to pay for her healthcare through May if she left quietly, Webb said. She refused. Not just because the offer was insulting to her, but she felt it sent the wrong message to her students.

And: 

“It is part of Marian’s mission to educate women about human diversity and in this have really missed out on a true life opportunity to set an example. Instead they are only perpetuating hate,” she wrote. She added: “It is a shame because Marian is an amazing school with a wonderful staff and a very promising student body. I feel horrible for the students that I was forced to leave behind and wish them only the best.”

The president of the school, Sister Lenore Pochelski, confirmed to the Detroit Free Press that Webb was no longer at the school as of Aug. 19, but refused to comment further.

September 10, 2014 in LGBT | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, September 5, 2014

Denmark's Trans Law--Model for the World?

From Slate: 

89444693-lesbian-couple-walks-past-the-copenhagen-cathedral-on

(a cathedral in Copenhagen)

From Slate: 

 

Even in countries that are nominally supportive of transgender people, sterilization—whether by surgery or hormones—is often the price a trans individual must pay in order to receive legal recognition of his or her transition. It’s a paradigm that theWorld Health Organization has called "counter to respect for bodily integrity, self-determination and human dignity," and it’s one that doesn’t acknowledge the fact that for many trans people, transition is not necessarily tied to invasive physical changes.

Earlier this week, Denmark moved beyond this inhumane legal logic when its new gender recognition law came into effect. Under the new policy, trans people in the country are now only required to fill out some paperwork in order to receive a new social security number and accompanying personal documentation for their gender. Medical intervention, including surgery, psychological diagnosis, and official statements, are no longer necessary prerequisites—in Denmark, gender identification is now based solely on self-determination.

September 5, 2014 in International, LGBT | Permalink | Comments (0)

Fight for Gay Rights Ends in Jamaica

The story

KINGSTON, JAMAICA - Young Jamaican gay rights activist who brought a legal challenged to the Caribbean island's anti-sodomy law has withdrawn the claim after multiple threats and violent backlashes, advocacy groups and colleagues said Aug. 29.

Javed Jaghai made headlines in 2013 after he initiated a constitutional court challenge to Jamaica's 1864 law that bans sex between men. Jaghai argues the law fuels homophobia and violates the 2011 adopted Human Rights Charter that guarantees people the right to privacy. However, Jaghai is withdrawing his challenge due to threats of violence.

More. 

September 5, 2014 in International, LGBT | Permalink | Comments (0)