Wednesday, August 19, 2015

"Latin America's Transgender-Rights Leaders"

From the New Yorker: 

About three weeks before the U.S. Supreme Court legalized same-sex marriage, the Colombian government issued a directive that received little international notice. On June 4th, the government announced that it would allow Colombian citizens to change their gender on identity documents without first undergoing gender-reassignment surgery or obtaining permission from a medical professional. These requirements, which remain in place, either in whole or in part, in the U.S. and most of the rest of the world, were “profoundly invasive of the right to privacy and based upon an impermissible bias,” said Yesid Reyes, the minister of justice. “The construction of sexual identity and gender is a matter that does not depend on biology.”

And: 

England and Spain passed the first laws making it easier for a person to change her gender on official documents, in 2004 and 2007, respectively, and Uruguay followed suit in 2009. Three years later, Argentina passed the most progressive gender-identity law in the world. Not only are Argentines spared the usual requirement of reassignment surgery or a medical diagnosis to change identity documents, but medical practitioners are bound by law to provide them with free hormone treatment and gender-reassignment surgery. Colombia’s decree, which was issued by the president, lacks the reach and force of Argentina’s legislation, but it is striking just the same. Now, in Colombia, all an individual has to do to change his or her gender on official documents is appear before a notary public.

August 19, 2015 in International, LGBT | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, August 17, 2015

"Jihad and Girl Power: How ISIS Lured 3 London Teenagers"

From the NYT, a seeming contradiction between women's rights and radical Islam: 

....young women attracted to what some experts are calling a jihadi, girl-power subculture. An estimated 4,000 Westerners have traveled to Syria and Iraq, more than 550 of them women and girls, to join the Islamic State, according to a recent report by the Institute for Strategic Dialogue, which helps manage the largest database of female travelers to the region.

And: 

They were smart, popular girls from a world in which teenage rebellion is expressed through a radical religiosity that questions everything around them. In this world, the counterculture is conservative. Islam is punk rock. The head scarf is liberating. Beards are sexy.

Ask young Muslim women in their neighborhood what kind of guys are popular at school these days and they start raving about “the brothers who pray.”

“Girls used to want someone who is good-looking; nowadays girls want Muslims who are practicing,” said Zahra Qadir, 22, who does deradicalization work for the Active Change Foundation, her father’s charity in East London. “It’s a new thing over the last couple of years. A lot of girls want that, even some nonpracticing girls.”

August 17, 2015 in International | Permalink | Comments (0)

"The village where men are banned"

Umoja women

From the Guardian, an intriguing story: 

Jane says she was raped by three men wearing Gurkha uniforms. She was herding her husband’s goats and sheep, and carrying firewood, when she was attacked. “I felt so ashamed and could not talk about it to other people. They did terrible things to me,” says Jane, her eyes alive with pain.

She is 38 but looks considerably older. She shows me a deep scar on her leg where she was cut by stones when she was pushed to the ground. In a quiet, hesitant voice she continues her story. “I eventually told my husband’s mother that I was sick, because I had to explain the injuries and my depression. I was given traditional medicine, but it did not help. When she told my husband [about the rape], he beat me with a cane. So I disappeared and came here with my children.”

And: 

Jane is a resident of Umoja, a village in the grasslands of Samburu, in northernKenya, surrounded by a fence of thorns. I arrive in the village at the hottest time of the day, when the children are sleeping. Goats and chickens wander around, avoiding the bamboo mats on which women sit making jewellery to sell to tourists, their fingers working quickly as they talk and laugh with each other. There are clothes drying in the midday sun on top of the huts made from cow dung, bamboo and twigs. The silence is broken by birdsong, shrill, sudden and glorious. It is a typical Samburu village except for one thing: no men live here.

August 17, 2015 in International, Manliness, Masculinities | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, August 13, 2015

Amnesty International Votes to Decriminalize Prostitution

Slate, Amnesty International Will Call for Decriminalizing All Prostitution

Amnesty International will support the decriminalization of all elements of prostitution—including paying for sex and facilitating sex-for-money transactions—after a vote of some 400 delegates at a meeting in Dublin, the New York Times reports:
 
The proposal about prostitution provoked an aggressive lobbying campaign by international groups opposed to sparing buyers and pimps from penalties. Competing petitions were organized by women’s groups and celebrities— including former President Jimmy Carter, who issued a letter on Monday — appealing to the group to maintain penalties for buyers and to “stay true to its mission.”

Countries including Germany, the Netherlands, and New Zealand already have the kind of highly tolerant policies Amnesty will now advocate for, the BBC says, while the Times notes that Sweden's and Norway's laws fall somewhere between prohibition and decriminalization; in those Scandinavian countries, prostitution itself is legal but paying for sex can be punished with "heavy fines and prison terms."

The proposed language of the new Amnesty policy cautions that sex-work practices "that involve coercion, deception, threats, or violence" should continue to be considered unacceptable before asserting that "the available evidence indicates that the criminalisation of sex work is more likely than not to reinforce discrimination against those who engage in these activities, to increase the likelihood that they will be subjected to harassment and violence, including ill-treatment at the hands of police, and to lead to the denial of due process and the exclusion from public benefits such as health services, housing, education, and immigration status."

August 13, 2015 in Human trafficking, International | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, August 3, 2015

"Andy Burnham: men convicted for being gay should get automatic pardons"

From the Guardian UK: 

An automatic legal pardon should be given to all men convicted under historical homosexuality laws without the need for families or individuals to apply to the government, the Labour leadership contender Andy Burnham has proposed. His pledge, following consultation with Sir Keir Starmer, the former director of public prosecutions and current Labour MP, means it would be possible to quash up to 50,000 convictions for acts that would be not be illegal today.

Burnham, who currently shares roughly the same number of constituency nominations as Jeremy Corbyn, said he will press prime minister David Cameron to make a relatively simple change to the law, but if he does not do so, it would form part of the first legislative programme of a Burnham-led government. The move comes two years after the royal pardon granted to second world war codebreaker Alan Turing.

Were there any women convicted the referenced law?  

August 3, 2015 in International, Legal History, Legislation, LGBT | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, July 31, 2015

"Law Society reveals 42 per cent gender pay gap among members"

From Scotland:  

New research by the Law Society of Scotland shows a 42 per cent gender pay gap among its members, the lawyers’ body has revealed.

The figure was reached by comparing average full-time and full-time equivalent (for part time/flexible hours employees) salaries for women and men at all career stages.

And: 

Janet Hood, convenor of the Law Society’s equality and diversity committee said the gap “reflects very badly on what is otherwise a modern and forward-thinking profession”.

She added: “There are many and nuanced reasons why the gender pay gap exists, and the legal profession is certainly not alone – figures from November 2014 show that the overall UK gap was 9.4 percent.

“However we have seen little change in the past decade compared to other professions such as accountancy or dentistry and it is a major concern that such a substantial gap persists 45 years after the UK Equal Pay Act and 10 years of Law Society equality research and promoting good practice within the legal profession.”

Ms Hood said the issue could not be ignored “for either ethical or business reasons” and there should be “no limit” set on the talent and ambition of women in the sector.

The referenced report by the Law Society of Scotland is available here.  

July 31, 2015 in International, Women lawyers, Work/life, Workplace | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, July 29, 2015

Fathers Discriminated by Citizenship Law

Unfortunate that I had missed this story earlier this month: 

A U.S. law that treats mothers and fathers differently in determining whether their foreign-born children may claim U.S. citizenship is unconstitutional, a federal appeals court ruled on Wednesday, four years after the U.S. Supreme Court split 4-4 on the issue.

The 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in New York said the statute applied "impermissible stereotyping" in imposing a tougher burden on fathers.

The law requires unwed fathers who are U.S. citizens to spend at least five years living in the United States - a 2012 amendment reduced it from 10 years - before they can confer citizenship onto a child born abroad, out of wedlock and to a partner who is not a U.S. citizen. For unwed U.S. mothers in the same situation, the requirement is only one year.

Wednesday's ruling is likely to have a limited effect in terms of the number of people it applies to, but the decision addresses important principles regarding ‎laws that explicitly treat the sexes differently, legal advocates said.

**the story continues here.  

July 29, 2015 in Family, International, Manliness, Masculinities | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, July 28, 2015

Almost...The First Female Supreme Court Justice in Afghanistan

Historic Bid To Become Afghanistan's First Female Justice Falls 9 Votes Short

The day is still etched in the Afghan judge’s mind more than a decade later — when she was in Washington, when she met with Supreme Court justices Sandra Day O’Connor and Ruth Bader Ginsburg. She recalls feeling awed and barely present, her thoughts instead flittering back to her country.

 

“I was asking myself whether we would ever have a similar situation in Afghanistan,“ said Anisa Rasooli, “where a woman judge would become a member of the Supreme Court.”

 

Last month, Rasooli came close — only to be let down by other women.

 

Afghanistan’s U.S.-educated president, Ashraf Ghani, had nominated Rasooli to become the country’s first female Supreme Court justice, carrying out an election promise. It was a landmark choice in a country where only 14 years ago, the Taliban Islamist regime bannedwomen from work, education and other parts of public life. They were forbidden from even leaving their homeswithout a male relative and a head-to-toe burqa.

 

Activists here and abroad were ecstatic. A woman on the bench of the country’s highest court could be an antidote to a growing concern: the erosion of gains in women’s rights as the Western military and aid footprint shrinks.

 

But then Afghanistan’s conservative establishment asserted itself. Influential Islamic clerics, as well as some male lawmakers, declared that a woman was not fit to try serious criminal cases. Their protests illustrated a continuing struggle pitting age-old traditions and customs against efforts to shape Afghanistan into a modern society.

 

Still, there were 69 female members in the Afghan parliament, which had to ratify Rasooli’s appointment, providing good odds for her to make history. But when the body met to vote this month, 23 female lawmakers were absent. Of 184 lawmakers present, 88 voted for her in the secret ballot — nine too few.

July 28, 2015 in International, Judges | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, July 27, 2015

Obama criticizes Kenya on gay rights

President Obama is presently traveling through Africa.  Recently, he gave a speech in Kenya condemning the nation's refusal to protect the rights of its gay citizens.  From the NYT: 

NAIROBI, Kenya—Widespread celebration of President Barack Obama’s visit to a country teeming with national pride over an American leader considered a local son was briefly overshadowed Saturday by a public disagreement with his Kenyan counterpart over gay rights.

In an awkward moment of tension, Mr. Obama condemned Kenya’s treatment of gays and lesbians as “wrong—full stop” while standing alongside Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta during a joint news conference.

The president, whose personal story has deep resonance in Kenya, even used himself as an example of why discrimination on the basis of gender, race or sexual orientation should be illegal.

“As an African American in the United States I am painfully aware of what happens when people are treated differently under the law,” said Mr. Obama, whose father was born and raised in Kenya.

To no avail......

But none of it swayed Mr. Kenyatta, who responded by saying his country does not share the U.S. president’s view.

“For Kenyans today the issue of gay rights is really a non-issue,” Mr. Kenyatta said, stressing matter-of-factly that economic and security concerns are of higher concern.

July 27, 2015 in International, LGBT | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, July 17, 2015

"Ireland passes law allowing trans people to choose their legal gender"

From the Guardian UK: 

Transgender people in Ireland have won legal recognition of their status after a law was passed allowing them to change their legal gender with no medical or state intervention.

The majority of countries in Europe require transgender people to undergo surgery and sterilisation, or be diagnosed with a mental disorder and get divorced if they are married, in order to have their desired gender legally recognised.

The gender recognition bill, passed late on Wednesday and set to be signed into law by the end of July, makes Ireland only the third European country, after Denmark and Malta, to allow transgender people aged over 18 to change their legal gender without intervention.

The bill was passed months after the people of Ireland backed same-sex marriageby a landslide in a referendum that marked a dramatic social shift in a country that decriminalised homosexuality just two decades ago.

July 17, 2015 in International, LGBT | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, July 9, 2015

Ratifying the UN Women's Rights Treaty at the Local Level

Women's Treaty Trying Local Doors to US Senate

Women in many other countries have also benefited from the Convention on the Elimination of all Forms of Discrimination Against Women, or CEDAW.

 

For girls and women in the United States--where gun violence, rape, sex harassment and domestic violence are all major problems --treaty approval is unlikely any time soon. That's because the United States is one of only a handful of countries--including Iran, Somalia and Sudan--that hasn't ratified the longstanding, U.N.-backed treaty, which is continually updated to strengthen human and civil rights for women.

 

U.S. presidents have given the treaty their backing. The Clinton and Carter administrations supported the treaty and in 2009 the Obama administration backed ratification. But for more than 30 years the U.S. Senate has refused to take the treaty to a vote.

 

In light of that, CEDAW backers are now turning to city governments to try to put pressure on the Senate.

 

At least 40 cities have expressed interest in putting in place their own version of CEDAW, says Karen Mulhauser, chair of the United Nations Association of the USA, which is pushing for ratification at the local level and by the U.S. Senate.

D.C. Seeks to Amend Law

The immediate target of opportunity, she says, is in the District of Columbia. In March, the D.C. City Council unanimously proposed a law that would amend the city's Human Rights Act to incorporate the principles of CEDAW, affirming human rights and equality for women and eliminating discrimination. Hearings are likely this fall.

 

The District is especially intriguing to CEDAW's backers because all of its legislation must also undergo congressional review, which could then force a debate on CEDAW in Congress. In other words, the District could open a backdoor that could draw more attention to the cause.

July 9, 2015 in International, Legislation | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, July 1, 2015

"Canadian elections hinge on women – at the polls and behind the scenes"

From the Guardian UK: 

The fact that the women’s vote could be a deciding factor in Canada’s forthcoming federal election is not lost on any of the three main parties.

For the first time in the country’s history, all three have women in charge of their national campaigns.

The Conservative national campaign manager, Jenni Byrne, New Democrat national campaign director, Anne McGrath, and Liberal national campaign co-chair, Katie Telford, will be engaged in the battle for votes in roles long dominated by men.

“The reality is that you can’t do poorly among women and win an election in Canada,” said pollster Nik Nanos.

July 1, 2015 in International | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, June 15, 2015

"Ireland Poised To Have Better Transgender Identity Law Than Most Of The World"

Who knew Ireland would the most progressive nation on earth with regard to LGBT issues? 

This month Ireland may go from not legally recognizing transgender people to having one of the best trans identity laws in the world.

Two weeks ago, the nation made history when it became thefirst country in the world to approve gay marriage by a popular vote.

Ireland may once again make history by allowing transgender people over the age of 18 to self-declare their gender on legal documents solely based on their self-determination, and without any medical intervention. The legislation is scheduled to go to committee stage on June 17.

June 15, 2015 in International, LGBT | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, May 30, 2015

Mixed-Race Miss Japan

From the NYT: 

TOKYO — WHEN Ariana Miyamoto was crowned Miss Universe Japan 2015, participants said she stole the show with a saucy strut, an infectious smile and a calm self-confidence that belied her 21 years. But it was not just her beauty and poise that catapulted her to national attention.

Ms. Miyamoto is one of only a tiny handful of “hafu,” or Japanese of mixed race, to win a major beauty pageant in proudly homogeneousJapan. And she is the first half-black woman ever to do so.

May 30, 2015 in International, Race | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, May 26, 2015

The Unintended Consequences of Family-Friendly Workplace Policies

It's what the early 20th century equality feminists feared from social feminism and protective labor laws.

NYT, When Family-Friendly Policies Backfire

In Chile, a law requires employers to provide working mothers with child care. One result? Women are paid less.

 

In Spain, a policy to give parents of young children the right to work part-time has led to a decline in full-time, stable jobs available to all women — even those who are not mothers.

 

Elsewhere in Europe, generous maternity leaves have meant that women are much less likely than men to become managers or achieve other high-powered positions at work.

 

Family-friendly policies can help parents balance jobs and responsibilities at home, and go a long way toward making it possible for women with children to remain in the work force. But these policies often have unintended consequences.

May 26, 2015 in Equal Employment, Family, International | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, May 24, 2015

Dublin Archbishop on Gay Marriage

BBC reports on surprising, and rather liberal, comments offered by the Dublin Archbishop after Ireland became the first nation to legalize gay marriage:

Diarmuid Martin, the archbishop of Dublin, said the Church in Ireland needed to reconnect with young people.

The referendum found 62% were in favour of changing the constitution to allow gay and lesbian couples to marry.

Archbishop of Dublin Diarmuid MartinThe archbishop voted 'No' in the referendum

The archbishop told the broadcaster RTE: "We [the Church] have to stop and have a reality check, not move into denial of the realities.

"We won't begin again with a sense of renewal, with a sense of denial.

"I appreciate how gay and lesbian men and women feel on this day. That they feel this is something that is enriching the way they live. I think it is a social revolution."

The archbishop personally voted "No" arguing that gay rights should be respected "without changing the definition of marriage".

"I ask myself, most of these young people who voted yes are products of our Catholic school system for 12 years. I'm saying there's a big challenge there to see how we get across the message of the Church," he added.

Ireland is the first country in the world to legalise same-sex marriage through a popular vote, and its referendum was held 22 years after homosexual acts were decriminalised in the Republic of Ireland.

 

May 24, 2015 in International, LGBT | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, May 7, 2015

"Banned from driving, Saudi women flock to ride-share apps"

From the LA Times, in a story that implies the acute connection between gender autonomy and physical movement: 

When Hala Radwan returned to Saudi Arabia after obtaining a business degree in France, she was eager to put her new skills to use.

She found a job in the marketing department of a big international company. There was just one problem: How would she get to and from work in the only country that does not allow women to drive?

 

May 7, 2015 in International, Religion | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, May 6, 2015

"Crying Rooms" for Women

The story--from the Korea Times--is depressingly spare in details, especially for a publication that claims to be a newspaper, but deeply suggestive in its weirdness:

 

By John-Patrick Gerard Thackeray

Japan will introduce hotel rooms for women "to cry the stress away."

The "crying rooms" will be tested in the Shinjuku ward of Tokyo and will offer scented tissues, make-up and movies specifically for women.

A hotel spokesperson said the rooms would "help woman overcome emotional problems and cry the stress away." They will cost about $84 a day.

In Asia, hotels and motels are slightly different from those of the Western world, mostly because of the experiences offered. These can range from themed rooms offering "planet experiences" to rooms that enable many to sleep together, which roughly translates as "sleep together shops."

With Asian women becoming more independent, the need for areas that are female-only is growing. After all, everyone needs time to let off a little steam occasionally. 

 

May 6, 2015 in International | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, April 27, 2015

World's Most Progressive Gender Identity Law?

(Pope Francis meets with Malta’s President, Marie-Louise Coleiro Preca during a private audience in September Gabriel Bouys / AP)

That Malta--the small archipelago in the Mediterranean--should pass the world's most progressive gender identity law is surprising.  Malta's constitution states that its official religion is Catholicism, and until 2011, it forbade divorce.  

But now:  

The Mediterranean country of Malta adopted the world’s most progressive gender identity law on Wednesday in a final vote by the country’s parliament on Wednesday.

The law is the latest in a series of LGBT rights laws ushered in by the Labour Party after taking power in 2013, a dramatic about-face for the country which has a constitution establishing Catholicism as the official religion.

The law — which goes beyond those its fellow European Union members have passed — would allow for someone to change their legal gender through simply filing an affidavit with a notary without a significant waiting period, eliminates any requirement for medical gender reassignment procedures, and prohibits discrimination on the basis of gender identity. It now heads to the desk of President Marie-Louise Coleiro Preca, and LGBT rights advocates expect her to sign.

It also includes some groundbreaking provisions for minors and intersex babies, those born without clearly male or female anatomy. Medical experts estimate that around .1 - .2 percent of children are born with atypical genitals that cannot be classified as either male or female, and in much of the world doctors operate on these children to make their anatomy clearly male or female.

 

April 27, 2015 in International | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, April 9, 2015

China Detains Women's Rights Activists

NYT, Chinese Police Seeking Charges Against Detained Women's Activists, Lawyer Says

Police officers in Beijing have asked prosecutors to charge five women’s rights activists who have been detained for more than a month with organizing a crowd to disturb public order, lawyers for two of them said on Thursday.

 

The filing allows the police to detain the activists, all of them women whose plight has led to harsh criticism from abroad, for seven more days while prosecutors make a decision on whether to bring charges.

 

The police had originally investigated the women on suspicion of “picking quarrels” but have since changed the charges they want prosecutors to impose, said one of the lawyers, Wang Qiushi.

 

He said the charges of organizing crowds to disturb public order were tied to two actions: an attempt by the women to organize a nationwide campaign last month against sexual harassment on public transportation, as well as an earlier public campaign they had carried out against domestic violence in which they wore wedding dresses smeared with fake blood.

 

 

April 9, 2015 in International | Permalink | Comments (0)