Tuesday, August 26, 2014

Feminist Goes Mainstream

Thursday, August 14, 2014

Gender Egalitarian Attitudes are No Longer Stalled, But are Not Much Better

Last week a Council on Contemporary Families online symposium provided new data suggesting that the stall in progress on gender egalitarian attitudes and behaviors has ended. Evidence has accumulated, and a stall in attitudes that started around 1994 may have turned around after 2004.

Long live the gender stall. Here’s what gets me. The change in attitudes is not due to men and women becoming more similar in their attitudes. Under gender egalitarianism (ideally) you wouldn’t be able to predict someone’s views based on their gender. But… in the graphs here, there’s no hint of gender convergence. The figure on the left from Cotter et al., shows that people are at a higher level of approving of gender egalitarianism. But, men and women are the same distance apart.
 
***
 
Youth stalled too? Younger generations—millenials in particular—are at a much higher level of egalitarian attitudes than others. But… in the Cotter analysis, younger generations’ support for gender equality isn’t increasing—they just started at a higher level. The trend is flat.
 
***
 
Except for one area. When asked what they think of the statement, “it is better if a man works and a woman takes care of the home,” students disagree with this less and less. In other words, they are not as likely to reject traditional gender roles as young people in the past. They dropped by 10 percent in the past 20 years (from 70 percent disagreeing to 60 percent disagreeing). While they are at 90 percent agreement that women should be considered as seriously for jobs as executives or politicians, Pepin speculates that for millennial “women are viewed as peers in entering the work force, but continue to be responsible for labor at home.”
 

August 14, 2014 in Gender, Work/life | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, August 7, 2014

Justice Ginsburg on the Male Justices' Blind Spot

From Justice Ginsburg's interview

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, fresh off a bruising loss in the Hobby Lobby birth control case last month, told Yahoo Global News Anchor Katie Couric in an exclusive interview that she believes the male Supreme Court justices who voted against her have a "blind spot" when it comes to women.

"Do you believe that the five male justices truly understood the ramifications of their decision?" Couric asked Ginsburg of the 5-4 Hobby Lobby ruling, which cleared the way for employers to deny insurance coverage of contraceptives to female workers on religious grounds.

"I would have to say no," the 81-year-old justice replied. Asked if the five justices revealed a "blind spot" in their decision, Ginsburg said yes.

The feisty leader of the court's minority liberal bloc compared the decision of her five male peers to an old Supreme Court ruling that found discriminating against pregnant women was legal.

 

August 7, 2014 in Gender, Women lawyers | Permalink | Comments (0)

CFP: AALS Next Generation Issues on Sex, Gender & Law

 

Association of American Law Schools

 

 

Call for Presentations and Papers

 

AALS Workshop on Next Generation Issues on 

Sex, Gender and the Law

 

June 24-26, 2015

Doubletree by Hilton at the Entrance to Universal Studios

Orlando, Florida 

We are seeking proposals for presentations and papers for the 2015 Workshop: Next Generation Issues of Sex, Gender and the Law, scheduled to take place June 24 - 26, 2015 at the Doubletree by Hilton at the Entrance to Universal Studios in Orlando, Florida.  

After more than forty years of formal sex equality under the law, this 2015 workshop will ask legal academics to look ahead to the future and identify, name, and analyze the next generation of legal issues, challenges, and questions that advocates for substantive gender equality must be prepared to consider.  To this end, we seek paper and presentation proposals that not only pinpoint and examine future law-related concerns about gender equality but that also provide innovative new approaches to achieving equality for women and those who challenge gender norms in our society, with a particular attention to employment, violence against women, reproductive rights, women's poverty, and women in legal education. 

Our hope is to build on the insights of the participants in the 2011 AALS Workshop on Women Rethinking Equality by exploring new and forward-looking ideas for scholarship, law reform, and advocacy that can bring about women's equality.  An additional expectation is that each session will address the ways in which characteristics other than gender, including race, sexual orientation, immigration status, socioeconomic class, and disability, impact women's lives.  We also anticipate that each session will analyze the institutional strengths and weaknesses of courts, legislatures, and administrative bodies for bringing about change and offer suggestions for legal reforms that can better meet women's needs.  Our final goal is to provide a rich and supportive atmosphere to foster mentoring and networking among teachers and scholars who are interested in women's equality and the law.

The format of the workshop will involve plenary sessions, concurrent sessions drawn from this Call for Presentations and Papers, and a closing panel. The closing panel, also drawn from this Call, will consist of a brainstorming session to consider projects and proposals for proactive measures to bring about gender equality. 

 Concurrent Sessions

The concurrent sessions will feature presentations related to gender equality issues, with preference given to presentations by junior scholars and those proposals related to the topics of employment, violence against women, reproductive rights, women's poverty, and women in legal education.  We will organize the presentations into panels based on the subject matter of the proposals.  Each presentation will last for 15 minutes, followed by questions from the moderator and audience.

Interested faculty should submit a brief written description (no more than 1000 words) of the proposed presentation, along with his or her resume.  Please e-mail these materials to 15wksp@aals.org by September 15, 2014.  We will notify selected speakers by November 1, 2014.

 

Brainstorming Proposals

The final plenary session of the conference will consist of 10-12 five-minute presentations of ideas for future projects that will advance gender equality in the law.  Each selected participant will be limited to five minutes to present his or her idea or project. The presentations will be followed by audience feedback and comments.  Although we will grant preference to presentations by junior scholars and those proposals related to the topics of employment, violence against women, reproductive rights, women's poverty, and women in legal education for the concurrent sessions, we welcome proposals for this brainstorming session on any topic related to gender equality.

Interested faculty should submit a written description of the proposed presentation (no more than 1000 words), along with his or her resume.  Please e-mail these materials to 15wksp@aals.org by September 15, 2014.  We will notify selected speakers by November 1, 2014.

Eligibility

Faculty members at AALS member schools are eligible to submit proposals.  

Fellows at AALS member schools are eligible to submit proposals along with current curriculum vitae. 

Visitors without faculty status at an AALS member law school and adjunct faculty members at AALS member schools are not eligible to submit proposals.  Faculty at U.S. non-member law schools are not eligible to submit proposals. We do welcome your attendance at the workshop. 

Proposers and panelists pay the registration fee and expenses. 

Please direct questions regarding this Call for Papers and Presentations to 15wksp@aals.org.

 

Planning Committee for the 2015 Workshop on Next Generation Issues of Sex, Gender and the Law

 

Angela Onwuachi-Willig, University of Iowa College of Law, Chair

William Eskridge, Yale Law School

Aya Gruber, University of Colorado School of Law

Kimberly Yuracko, Northwestern University School of Law

Rebecca Zietlow, University of Toledo College of Law

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

August 7, 2014 in Call for Papers, Gender | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Title IX Should Mean Equal Access for Transgender Students

Harper Jean Tobin and Jennifer Levi have posted Securing Equal Access to Sex-Segregated Facilities for Transgender Students, 28 Wisconsin J. Law, Gender & Soc'y 301 (2013).

If Title IX is to have any real meaning for transgender students, it must protect a student's ability to live and participate in school as a member of the gender with which they identify. This means that students must be permitted to use gender-segregated spaces, including restrooms and locker rooms, consistent with their gender identity, without restriction. Denial of equal access to facilities that correspond to a student's gender identity singles out and stigmatizes transgender students, inflicts humiliation and trauma, interferes with medical treatment, and empowers bullies. A student subjected to these conditions is, by definition, deprived of an equal opportunity to learn because of his or her transgender status, and therefore, because of his or her sex. Arguments against equal access reflect broader animus and stereotypes about transgender people, and rely on justifications that have been rejected by courts in related contexts. Access consistent with a student's gender identity is widely practiced, and is the only workable and nondiscriminatory approach that is consistent with Title IX's requirement of equal educational opportunity.

July 29, 2014 in Education, Gender | Permalink | Comments (0)

Historian's Amicus on Sex and Citizenship for Foreign-Born Children

Kristin Collins (Boston U) has posted A Short History of Sex and Citizenship: The Historians' Amicus Brief in Flores-Villar v. US.

The historians’ amicus brief that accompanies this essay was submitted to the Supreme Court in Flores-Villar v. United States, an equal protection challenge to federal statutes that regulate the citizenship status of foreign-born children of American parents. When the parents of such children are unmarried, federal law encumbers the ability of American fathers to secure citizenship for their children, while providing American mothers with a nearly unfettered ability to do the same. The general question before the Court in Flores-Villar – and a question that the Court has addressed in sum and substance on two other occasions during the last thirteen years – was whether the gender asymmetry in this statutory scheme is consistent with constitutional sex-equality principles. The goal of the historians’ amicus brief in Flores-Villar was to explain to the Court how this ostensibly obscure citizenship law is part of a larger historical phenomenon: the persistence of gender-based sociolegal norms in determining citizenship. The introductory essay provides an overview of the account provided in the brief and discusses how generic conventions shaped the amicus brief’s presentation of the history of sex-based citizenship laws.

July 29, 2014 in Family, Gender | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

New Study Suggest Hobby Lobby About Maintaining Women's Economic Dependence on Men

New Study Helps Explain Why Hobby Lobby Supporters are so Fiercely Opposed to Birth Control

According to new research published in Archives of Sexual Behavior, the attitude that women shouldn’t be having sex can at least partly be traced back to the idea that women are supposed to be economically dependent on men.  The researchers suggest that this link may drive conservative religious communities’ insistence on sexual purity....

 

The researchers conclude that this outdated attitude toward women’s pregnancy risks and financial needs hasn’t totally gone away, despite the fact that modern contraception, legal abortion rights, and greater workplace equality have created an entirely different society.

 

“The beliefs may persist due to cultural evolutionary adaptive lag, that is, because the environment has changed faster than the moral system,” the paper concludes. “Religious and conservative moral systems may be anti-promiscuity because they themselves arose in environments where females depended heavily on male investment.”

July 15, 2014 in Gender | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, July 10, 2014

Feminism Loses While Gay Equality Wins

Why are Women Losing While Gays Win? It's All About Sex.

[T]he Daily Beast published a thought-provoking post–Hobby Lobbypiece by Jay Michaelson pondering why women are losing legal battles while gay people keep winning. Michaelson gives 10 reasonable hypotheses, but leaves out the two most overwhelmingly obvious possibilities. The first is that Justice Anthony Kennedy likes gay rights more than women’s rights. The second is that feminism, as insidiously framed by the Christian right, is all about sex—while LGBTQ equality has become a battle not for sex, but for dignity.

July 10, 2014 in Gender | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, June 26, 2014

Books: Equality Deferred

From the Legal History blog: New Release: Clément on "Sex Discrimination and British Columbia's Human Rights State, 1953-84"

In Equality Deferred, Dominique Clément traces the history of sex discrimination in Canadian law and the origins of human rights legislation, demonstrating how governments inhibit the application of their own laws, and how it falls to social movements to create, promote, and enforce these laws. 

Focusing on British Columbia -- the first jurisdiction to prohibit discrimination on the basis of sex -- Clément documents a variety of absurd, almost unbelievable, acts of discrimination. The province was at the forefront of the women's movement, which produced the country's first rape crisis centres, first feminist newspaper, and first battered women's shelters. And yet nowhere else in the country was human rights law more contested. For an entire generation, the province's two dominant political parties fought to impose their respective vision of the human rights state. This history of human rights law, based on previously undisclosed records of British Columbia's human rights commission, begins with the province’s first equal pay legislation in 1953 and ends with the collapse of the country's most progressive human rights legal regime in 1984. 

This book is not only a testament to the revolutionary impact of human rights on Canadian law but also a reminder that it takes more than laws to effect transformative social change.

June 26, 2014 in Books, Gender | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, June 17, 2014

Judges, Daughters and Women's Rights

From the NYT, Another Factor Said to Sway Judges to Rule for Women's Rights: A Daughter

It turns out that judges with daughters are more likely to vote in favor of women’s rights than ones with only sons. The effect, a new study found, is most pronounced among male judges appointed by Republican presidents, like Chief Justice Rehnquist....

 

There was no relationship between having daughters and liberal votes generally. Daughters made a difference in only “civil cases having a gendered dimension....”

 

The most likely explanation, Professor Sen said, was the one offered by Justice Ginsburg. “By having at least one daughter,” Professor Sen said, “judges learn about what it’s like to be a woman, perhaps a young woman, who might have to deal with issues like equity in terms of pay, university admissions or taking care of children.”

June 17, 2014 in Gender | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, May 28, 2014

Gianmarco Monsellato Thinks "Lean In" and "Diversity Programs" are a Joke

Gianmarco Monsellato is a partner at the No. 5 law firm in France. His firm also has 50/50 gender balance at every level--including equity partnership.    

How did he do it? Dramatically differently than most law firms. Most of his competitors have spent years organizing women’s initiatives, networks, or mentoring programs that have done little to increase the percentage of women reaching the top. The National Association of Women Lawyers’ recent report is pretty clear: These “fix the women” approaches have not delivered.

Monsellato puts the burden squarely on the partner himself to be extremely proactive:  

Instead, Monsellato tackled the problem personally. He was involved in every promotion discussion. “For a long time,” he says, “I was the only one allocating cases.” He insisted on gender parity from the beginning. He personally ensured that the best assignments were evenly awarded between men and women. He tracked promotions and compensation to ensure parity. If there was a gap, he asked why. He put his best female lawyers on some of his toughest cases. When clients objected, he personally called them up and asked them to give the lawyer three months to prove herself. In every case, the client was quick to agree and managed to overcome the initial gender bias.

The idea is intriguing.  It is also an idea that probably requires the right combination of corporate culture, amenable clients, and, most importantly, a highly deft corporate leader who also possesses an unusal charisma and great foresight about business productivity.  Not easy to duplicate this model.  

May 28, 2014 in Equal Employment, Gender, Women lawyers | Permalink | Comments (1)

Saturday, May 24, 2014

Calls Again to Change Iowa's Pink Locker Room

From the Daily Iowan: Editorial: Time to Redecorate Kinnick's Pink Locker Room

When opponents of the Iowa football team walk into their locker room on any given autumn Saturday, they are met with a tradition that is unique even by the somewhat off-kilter standards of college sports traditions. The locker room, the walls, the stalls, the towels, the floor, even the urinals, rather than displaying the shade of white common in most Iowa facilities, are bright pink.

 

The famous pink locker room, started in 1979 by legendary football coach Hayden Fry and garishly renovated in 2005, have become ingrained into the university’s DNA. There is a time when all trends must die, however: The pink locker room should be redecorated.

 

It’s blatantly obvious that the pink locker room is a rather childish example of a destructive and anachronistic culture. As University of Iowa Professor Kembrew McLeod pointed out in the Des Moines Register last week, the governing philosophy behind the color arrangement is that pink is a “girl” color; forcing the über-masculine opponents of the Hawkeyes to prepare themselves in the presence of a “feminine” color will disturb the opposing players’ minds so much that they will fail to conquer the Hawkeyes.

May 24, 2014 in Gender, Sports | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, May 22, 2014

Empirical Database on Gender Diversity in the Patent Bar

 Saurabh Vishnubhakat (Postdoc, Duke & NIH),  has posted Gender Diversity in the Patent Bar, 14 John Marshall L. Rev. __ (2014).  From the abstract:

This article describes the state of gender diversity across technology and geography within the U.S. patent bar. The findings rely on a new gender-matched dataset, the first public dataset of its kind, not only of all attorneys and agents registered to practice before the United States Patent and Trademark Office, but also of attorneys and agents on patents granted by the USPTO. To enable follow-on research, the article describes all data and methodology and offers suggestions for refinement. This study is timely in view of renewed interest about the participation of women in the U.S. innovation ecosystem, notably the provision of the Leahy-Smith America Invents Act directing the USPTO to study diversity, including gender diversity, among patent applicants, and of related research by the National Women’s Business Council on usage of the U.S. patent and trademark systems by U.S.-based female entrepreneurs. Analysis of gender data on the patent bar complements these studies and begins to provide a more complete picture of diversity in the U.S. patent system.

 

May 22, 2014 in Business, Gender, Women lawyers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, May 20, 2014

The Origins of Privilege Critique in Feminist Studies

The Origins of "Privilege"

The idea of “privilege”—that some people benefit from unearned, and largely unacknowledged, advantages, even when those advantages aren’t discriminatory —has a pretty long history. . . . .But the concept really came into its own in the late eighties, when Peggy McIntosh, a women’s-studies scholar at Wellesley, started writing about it. In 1988, McIntosh wrote a paper called “White Privilege and Male Privilege: A Personal Account of Coming to See Correspondences Through Work in Women’s Studies.”

(Hat tip: Brant Lee)

May 20, 2014 in Gender | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, May 14, 2014

Hanna Rosin Says That Discrimination Against Fathers Is Exaggerated

From Rosin's Slate article:  

It used to be that women had to worry about men disappearing after they got pregnant or divorced. Now, some women have the opposite problem. A growing fathers’ rights movement is aggressively challenging what it sees as the courts’ assumption that the mother is the only real parent.  Men’s rights activists air their grievances about unfair child custody laws on sites such as A Voice for Men and on subreddits like Men’s Rights and The Red Pill

And: 

One recent study showed that people are generally in favor of joint custody, but they believe that divorce courts are seriously slanted toward mothers.

And, this too: 

But is this actually true? “There’s a real perception—even women share it—that courts are unfair to fathers,” says Ira Ellman, a custody expert at Arizona State University. But in fact the great revolution in family court over the past 40 years or so has been the movement away from the presumption that mothers should be the main, or even sole, caretakers for their children. Individual cases like Patric’s may raise novel legal issues, but on the whole, courts are fair to men, particularly men who can afford a decent lawyer.

May 14, 2014 in Family, Gender, Manliness, Masculinities | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, May 13, 2014

The Return of the Welfare Queen

Michele Gillman (Baltimore) has posted The Return of the Welfare Queen, 22 American J. Gender, Social Policy & Law (forthcoming).

  • The “welfare queen” was shorthand for a lazy woman of color, with numerous children she cannot support, who is cheating taxpayers by abusing the system to collect government assistance.
  • The good news is that dependency rhetoric did not work and may have backfired.
  • The bad news is that the welfare queen still lurks behind repeated calls to cut government benefits and to criminalize poverty.
  • This article explores the legacy of the welfare queen, her return in the 2012 presidential campaign, and the current inadequacies of TANF. The article concludes with suggestions to reform TANF in the hopes of burying the welfare queen once and for all

May 13, 2014 in Gender, Poverty | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, May 10, 2014

The Truth About Mother's Day

Gendered, even in Death

From Slate, The New York Times Obituary Page has a Grave Imbalance.  Just 10% of the NYT obits are of women.  Amanda Hess argues,

I think a new mindfulness needs to take place about who is deemed important to cover, and for what kinds of achievements. I would guess there are dozens of writers, scientists, and academics whose lives and deaths go unnoticed because the men's lives are perceived as more of note.

 

While the keepers of the Times parody account went on to snark that the newspaper is confident that it gives “equal prominence to all significant deaths, regardless of gender,” the real Times obituary desk has made some effort to respond to feminist criticism of its coverage. Last year, the Times led its obituary of rocket scientist Yvonne Brill with the detail that she “made a mean beef stroganoff, followed her husband from job to job and took eight years off from work to raise three children.” (She may have worked at NASA in life, but the Times put her back in the kitchen in death.) But after widespread outrage about the coverage, the Times took out the stroganoff reference in the obit’s online version.

May 10, 2014 in Gender | Permalink | Comments (0)

Professors are Prejudiced Too

From the authors of the recent study Professors are Prejudiced Too that has been in the news.  Explaining the methodology of how they discovered that professors respond more to mentor students who are white men.

  • The good news. "Despite not knowing the students, 67 percent of the faculty members responded to the emails, and remarkably, 59 percent of the responders even agreed to meet on the proposed date with a student about whom they knew little and who did not even attend their university."                                                                                                                                                         
  • The bad news. "Professors were more responsive to white male students than to female, black, Hispanic, Indian or Chinese students in almost every discipline and across all types of universities."                                                                                                                                                                         
  • And. "We found the most severe bias in disciplines paying higher faculty salaries and at private universities."

Maybe its not just Princeton freshmen that need to check their privilege. 

May 10, 2014 in Education, Gender | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, May 8, 2014

Gender and Tax Evasion

Robert McGee (Fayetteville), Gender and the Ethics of Tax Evasion.

The study begins:

Gender is perhaps the most widely studied demographic variable. It is an interesting variable from the perspectives of economics, law, philosophy, political science, psychology, sociology, anthropology, religion, history and culture, to name a few. What makes women different from men? How are they different from men? Is female thinking becoming closer to male thinking as women gain equal rights and liberation?

This compilation of existing studies suggests to the author that women are more tax compliant, less self-reliant, and significantly less likely to engage in criminal behavior.  The possible explanations include that women are more ethical, more moral, more deferential to authority, and less risk averse. 

May 8, 2014 in Gender | Permalink | Comments (0)