Thursday, November 13, 2014

Gender, Race and Poverty: International Conference Watch Live Today

Gender, Race and Poverty: Addressing Multiple Identities Through Law

Objectives

The purpose of the workshop is to bring together researchers from different parts of the world to share their findings about the role of law in addressing some of the most challenging aspects of discrimination: those involving the intersection between gender, race and poverty. There were few opportunities of getting together researchers in Latin America, Africa, Europe and North America to work together on these issues. Despite the problems, the legal challenges and possibilities for reform are similar and closely related. The workshop will address the international and comparative law, and theory and practice.

Context

The World Development Report 2012 identified substantive victories for women: there was an increase in their schooling, in their life expectancy and  in their participation in the labor market. However, these gains were not reachable to poor women. Women in countries with low and middle income are more likely than men to die, they face unequal access to economic opportunities and are being marginalized in their homes and in society. This results in a cycle of discrimination and disempowerment. Women are responsible for a disproportionate share of care tasks in their homes, an activity that is not valued or remunerated, leading to lower levels of education and lack of preparation to seek financial independence in the formal labor market or to break with prejudices and stereotypes the role of women.

 

Whereas the World Development Report highlights that these gaps are more pronounced when gender and poverty are combined with other exclusion factors – ethnicity, caste, remoteness, age, race, disability and sexual orientation – there should have a critical study of forms of interaction between gender, race and poverty. While the feminization of poverty is a phenomenon long recognized, gender inequality, racial inequality and poverty are conceptualized as separate problems. Poverty is often approached from a neutral point of view with regard to gender, rather than adopting a comprehensive, integrated and holistic gender perspective. Likewise, racial discrimination is accessed by a neutral perspective regarding both gender and poverty. These approaches are not adequate to portray the various and intricate human rights violations experienced by poor women with multiple identities

November 13, 2014 in Conferences, International, Poverty | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, October 25, 2014

Highlights of Legal History Conference on Gender and Law Topics

From the program for the 2014 American Society of Legal History conference coming up Nov. 6 in Denver.  Here are the presentations related to gender and the law.  It is really great to see so many talks in this field.

 

On the panel "Gender in US Legal History"

    Chair/Commentator: Serena Mayeri, University of Pennsylvania Law School

    Kimberly A. Reilly, University of Wisconsin-Green Bay, “For Love or Money: Loss of Services Suits and the Transformation of Wives’ Household Labor, 1870-1920”

Larissa Werhnyak, University of Iowa, “To Make the World Safe For Men: The Anti-Heart Balm Campaigns of the 1930s”

    Jeffrey D. Gonda, Syracuse University, “On a Different Home Front: Black Women & Shelley v. Kraemer, 1944-1948”

    Lauren MacIvor Thompson, Georgia State University, “'An Outrage to Common Sense': Legal and Medical Conceptions of Female Disability in the Women's Rights Movement, 1870-1930”

 

On the panel "Contesting Custody, Creating Rights: Family Law and Equality Claims in Late 20th-Century America"

    Chair:Commentator Karen M. Tani, University of California-Berkeley School of Law

    Deborah Dinner, Washington University School of Law, “The Divorce Bargain: The Fathers’ Rights Movement and the Dual System of Family Law”

    Serena Mayeri, University of Pennsylvania Law School, “Unmarried Fathers, Sex Equality, and Marital Supremacy, 1970-1983”

    Marie-Amelie George, Yale University, “The Custody Crucible: The Centrality of Lesbian Mother Custody Cases in Gay Rights” 

 

On the panel "Women Acting Locally, Women Acting Globally: Female Activists Trying to Shape a Modern World Across the 20th Century"

     Chair/Commentator: Nupur Chaudhuri, Texas Southern University

     Susan Hinely, Stony Brook University, “The Theory and Practice of International Justice in the Pre-War Suffrage Movement”

     Kathleen Banks Nutter, Smith College, “‘Abundant life for all’: American YWCA Workers in Turkey, 1920-1935”

    Gwen Jordan, University of Illinois-Springfield, “Building Transnational Coalitions of Women of Color During the Cold War: The Work of Edith Sampson and the National Council of Negro Women”

  

And presentations included on other panels:

Katrina Jagodinsky, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, "The Legal Pluralisms of Indigenous Women and their Daughters, 1854-1934”

Donna Schuele, University of California-Irvine, “California's Women's Rights Movement: The Promise and Perils of the 14th Amendment”

Nan Goodman, University of Colorado-Boulder, “'I hear no things laid to my charge': Oral and Written Discourse in Anne Hutchinson's Trial Transcript”

Sarah Bakkali, Université Panthéon-Assas (Paris II), “Female Impotence in Medieval Canon Law”

Alison L. Lefkovitz, NJIT/Rutgers University-Newark, “Husbands and Wives at Risk: Sexual Access, Household Labor, and Backlash, 1963-1984”

Evelyn Atkinson, University of Chicago (student), “The Telegraph Cases: Law, Gender, Family, and Corporate Responsibility in the Late 19th Century"

October 25, 2014 in Conferences, Legal History | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Sex Discrimination History and the Flight Attendant Story

Flight Attendants Helped to Ground Sex Discrimination

[B]efore she started her job each day, Worrell had to step on the scale to prove she weighed between 105 and 118 pounds, undergo an inspection to make sure the seams in her stockings were straight and submit to a girdle check.

 

"It was just the way it was back then," says Worrell, 66, who started as a "stewardess" with United Airlines in 1968. "I didn't think it was the least bit odd. If they told me to stand on my head in the corner, I probably would have done it."

 

But during her 34-year career as a flight attendant, Worrell and other young women who started as stewardesses helped change the way the airlines and all employers dealt with women in the wake of the groundbreaking Civil Rights Act of 1964 and its Title VII, which prohibits employment discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex and national origin.

 

"The flight attendants played an astonishing role in the development of Title VII," says professor Mary Rose Strubbe, assistant director of the Institute for Law and the Workplace at IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law. Strubbe, 66, who started her law career with a Chicago firm representing many of those flight attendants in discrimination cases, will be one of the presenters Thursday at the institute's conference on the role of flight attendants in fighting sex discrimination.

More on the conference

Title: "The Civil Rights Act @ 50: The Pioneering Role of Flight Attendants in Fighting Sex Discrimination"
What: A multimedia exploration of the critical role flight attendants played in the enforcement of Title VII's prohibition against sex discrimination in the workplace
When: 9:30 a.m. to noon Thursday, Oct. 23
Where: IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law's Governor Richard B. Ogilvie Auditorium, 565 W. Adams St., Chicago
Sponsors: IIT Chicago-Kent's Institute for Law and the Workplace, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and the Equal Employment Opportunity Committee of the ABA Section of Labor and Employment Law
Cost: Free         

October 21, 2014 in Conferences, Equal Employment | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, September 20, 2014

Gender and Justice Programs at AALS 2015

Saturday, January 3

 Co-Sponsored Program, Liberty-Equality:  Gender, Sexuality, and Reproduction—Griswold v. Connecticut Then and Now, 8:30 a.m. – 10:15 a.m.

Presented by the Section on Constitutional Law and co-sponsored by the Sections on Women in Legal Education and Legal History,  this program marks the 50th anniversary of Griswold v. Connecticut, the ground-breaking Supreme Court decision recognizing a right to privacy that protected individuals in making decisions about the use of contraceptives from the reach of state criminal law, but spoke implicitly to the constitutional underpinnings of an individual’s rights or interests in intimacy, marriage, procreation, sexuality, and sexual conduct.  Panelists will place the case in historical context, and explore the development of the Griswold doctrine, as well as its implications for current constitutional controversies over access to reproductive health care, marriage, sexuality and sexual conduct.

 

Speakers

Speaker: Cary C. Franklin, The University of Texas School of Law

Co-Moderator: M. Isabel Medina, Loyola University New Orleans College of Law

Speaker: Melissa E. Murray, University of California, Berkeley School of Law

Speaker: Doug NeJaime, University of California, Irvine School of Law

Speaker: Neil S. Siegel, Duke University School of Law

Co-Moderator Speaker: Reva B. Siegel, Yale Law School

 

Section on Women in Legal Education Luncheon, 12:15 – 1:30 p.m.

 We are pleased to announce that this luncheon honors both Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who is scheduled to attend and for whom the Section on Women in Legal Education Ruth Bader Ginsburg Lifetime Achievement Award is named, and this year’s Award recipient, [I’ll fill this in before I send and after I talk with her].  Join us to spend some time with and hear from our honorees.

 

 Joint Program:  Engendering Equality:  A Conversation with Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Associate Justice, Supreme Court of the United States

and New Voices in Legal History, 1:30 – 3:15 p.m. 

This Section on Legal History and Women in Legal Education Joint Program, co-sponsored by the Section on Constitutional Law,explores the history of women’s equality and the legacy of Justice Ginsburg.  The first portion of the program will, through a conversation between Justice Ginsburg and Wendy Williams, consider the ideas and strategies shaping Justice Ginsburg’s efforts as an advocate, an academic, and a Justice to achieve equal citizenship for women.  

The second portion of the program will present a panel of new voices in Women’s Legal History who study the complex and often contradictory ways in which social, political, and legal actors have appealed to gender and equality in movements of the past, and suggest how such studies might engender/inform equality’s future.

Speakers

Speaker: Deborah Dinner, Washington University in St. Louis School of Law

Speaker: Lynda Dodd,  City College of New York, Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership

Speaker: The Honorable Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Supreme Court of the United States

Co-Moderator: Reva B. Siegel, Yale Law School

Co-Moderator: Tracy A. Thomas, University of Akron, C. Blake McDowell Law Center

Speaker: Wendy W. Williams, Georgetown University Law Center

Speaker: Mary Ziegler, Florida State University College of Law

 

Sunday, January 4

AALS Crosscutting Program:  The More Things Change . . . Exploring Solutions to Persisting Discrimination in Legal Academia, 2:00 – 3:45 p.m.

This program, spearheaded by WILE Member Meera Deo, draws from empirical data, legal research, litigation strategy, and personal experience to both further conversations about the persistence of discrimination in the legal academy and activate strategies for addressing ongoing structural and individual barriers. Intersectional bias compounds many of these challenges, which range from the discriminatory actions of colleagues and students, to the marginalization of particular subject areas in the curriculum, to structural hierarchies in the profession.

By creating an avenue for direct personal exchange regarding these topics, the program seeks to build community between like-minded individuals who are diverse across characteristics of race, gender, class, teaching status, institution, and age. The focus of the participants is to share best practices and explore new approaches for overcoming ongoing discrimination, with the hope that these strategies may be more broadly employed.

The program follows an innovative format. After short presentations by three speakers, the program transitions to an “open microphone” session of speakers (selected in advance from a “call for remarks”) including those who are untenured, women of color, allies to marginalized faculty, clinical, legal writing and library faculty, and others with perspectives that may differ from the majority. The final thirty minutes are reserved for questions and conversation.

Speakers

Moderator and Commentator: Marina Angel, Temple University, James E. Beasley School of Law

Speaker: Meera Deo, Thomas Jefferson School of Law

Speaker: Angela P. Harris, University of California at Davis School of Law

Speaker: Melissa Hart, University of Colorado School of Law

September 20, 2014 in Conferences, Education, Law schools, Legal History | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, August 31, 2014

LAT CRIT and SALT Conference

I received a request from Prof. Charlotte Garden at Seattle to post about the upcoming Lat Crit-SALT conference, which I am happy to do.  

Twelfth Annual LatCrit-SALT
Call for ParticipationJunior Faculty Development WorkshopOctober 9, 2014University of Nevada-Las VegasLas Vegas, NV 

LatCrit, Inc. and the Society of American Law Teachers (SALT) are pleased to invite interested participants to the Twelfth Annual Junior Faculty Development Workshop (FDW), immediately preceding the SALT Teaching Conference.  This annual workshop is designed for critical, progressive, and social justice oriented pre-tenure professors, including clinicians and legal writing professors, as well as those who may be contemplating a teaching career.  However, we also encourage more senior members of the profession to attend, share their experience, and serve as resources and mentors.

The FDW is designed to familiarize critical, progressive, and social justice oriented junior faculty with LatCrit and SALT principles and values and support them in the scholarship, teaching, and service aspects of professional success.  In addition, the FDW seeks to foster scholarship in progressive, social justice, and critical outsider jurisprudence, including LatCrit theory, among new and junior faculty, students, and practitioners.  Finally, the FDW aims to cultivate a community of scholars interested in the continuation of this and similar projects over the years.

To facilitate community building through shared experiences and the exchange of ideas, we strongly encourage all participants to attend the entire workshop.

If you have questions about the workshop or would like to attend, please email SALTLatCritFDW@gmail.com.  Although we will make efforts to accommodate all interested participants, RSVPs are strongly suggested by September 30, 2014. 

Registration for the SALT Biennial Teaching Conference is available at http://www.saltlaw.org/conference_registration/

 

August 31, 2014 in Call for Papers, Conferences, Poverty, Race, Theory | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, August 26, 2014

Akron Program on the Social and Legal Implications of Same Sex Families Featuring Stephanie Coontz

Program Schedule: The Social and Legal Implications of Same Sex Families

Families and Communities Interdisciplinary Seminar
The Social and Legal Implications of Same Sex Relationships
September 11, 2014 – 7 hours CLE and CEU

8:00 a.m.

Registration & Continental Breakfast
Sponsored by The University of Akron School of Law, Law Association for Women

8:25 a.m. Introductory Remarks – Gary Rosen, Partner, Goldman & Rosen
8:30 a.m.

How Did We Get Here? Historical Context and Contemporary Implications of the Spread of Same-Sex Marriage
Featured Speaker: 
Stephanie Coontz, Author; Director of Research and Public Education for the Council on Contemporary Families; Professor at The Evergreen State College, Washington

9:30 a.m.

State of the Law Today
Presenter:
Marc SpindelmanIsadore and Ida Topper Professor of Law, The Ohio State University Moritz College of Law

10:30 a.m. Break – Sponsored by Akron Family Institute
10:45 a.m.

Religious & Social Issues
Presenters:  
Gizelle Jones, Executive Director, Jewish Family Services
Rabbi Emeritus David M. Horowitz, DD, Temple Israel; PFLAG, National Board and past president, Akron Chapter
Dr. Joe Coffey, Lead Pastor, Christ Community Chapel

11:30 a.m.

Lunch – Sponsored by Summit County Probate Court
Structured Discussion Activity

12:30 p.m.

Case Study
Nancy Reeves, Assistant Director, Academic Success Program
The University of Akron School of Law

12:45 p.m.

Probate Issues
Presenters:  
Jennifer L. Branch, Equire, Partner, Gerhardstein & Branch Co. LPA, Cincinnati  
The Honorable Elinor Marsh Stormer, Judge, Summit County Probate Court
Emily M. Hete, Esquire

1:30 p.m.

Domestic Relations – Divorce, Parentage, Domestic Violence 
Presenters:  
The Honorable John P. Quinn, Judge, Domestic Relations Court of Summit County 
Thomas J. Addesa, Esquire Artz Dewhirst & Wheeler, Columbus

2:15 p.m. Break – Sponsored by CANAPI
2:30 p.m.

Juvenile Issues: A Child’s Perspective
Presenters:
The Honorable Linda Tucci Teodosio, Judge Summit County Juvenile Court
Dr. Erich Merkle, School Psychologist and Student Support Services & Security, Akron Public Schools
Julie Barnes, Executive Director
Summit County Children Services Board

3:15 p.m. Q&A – Written questions collected from audience
3:45 p.m.

Closing Panel – Where do we go from here?
Presenter:
Stephanie Coontz and other speakers

4:15 p.m. Adjournment 

This course has been approved by the Supreme Court of Ohio Commission on Continuing Legal Education for 7.00 total CLE hours instruction.

 

REGISTER HERE.

August 26, 2014 in Conferences | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, May 29, 2014

Feminist Legal Theory at Law & Society Beginning Today

Here is the final and revised schedule of the awesome Collaborative Research Network on Feminist Legal Theory at today's Law & Society Conference.  Hope to have some live blogging from Jamie Abrams.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 28

 Book Discussion: Becoming Sexual by Danielle Egan 7 pm, University of Minnesota, Lindquist & Vennum Conference Room

 THURSDAY, MAY 29

 Alternatives to Marriage, Chair: June Carbone

Erez Aloni, Beyond Recognition: Redistribution in Family Law

Jessica Feinberg, The Survival of Non-Marital Relationship Statuses in the Same-Sex Marriage Era: A Proposal

Leslie Harris,Drifting Toward Marriage: How and Why Legal Structures for Alternative Family Forms Converge on Marriage

Theodore Seto, A Coasian Theory of Marriage

Discussants: Kerry Abrams, June Carbone

 

Feminist Perspectives on Health Care, Chair: Kara Loewentheil

Jamie Abrams, Revealing the Illusion of Patient Autonomy and the Ghost of Roe’s Medical Model

Kara Loewentheil, When Free Exercise Is a Burden: Protecting “Third Parties” In Religious Accommodation Law

Seema Mohapatra, Time to Lift the Veil of Inequality in Health Care Coverage: Using Corporate Law to Defend the Affordable Care Act’s Reproductive Health Care Mandate

Discussants:  Jessica Waters, Margaux Hall

                   

ART and Parentage, Chair: Wendy Bach

Courtney Joslin, The Biology Myth

Jody Madiera, The Legal Consequences of Infertility Patients’ Self-Identification as Consumer or Patient

Dara Purvis, Fathers, Abortion, and Equal Rights

Kara Swanson, Alternative Insemination and Adoption: Historical Perspectives

Discussants: Johanna Bond, Deborah Dinner, Marie Failinger

 

Same Sex Marriage and Divorce, Chair: William Kuby

Cynthia Godsoe, Considering Gay Parenthood

Zvi Triger and Ayelet Blecher-Prigat, Same-Sex Divorce and the Right to Divorce

Ann Tweedy, Same-Sex Marriage and Indian Tribes

Deborah Widiss, Federal Marriage Discrimination, Take Two

Discussant: William Kuby

 

"Just the Facts:” Expertise and Empirical Evidence as Movement Strategies, Chair: Rachel Rebouche

 Libby Adler, Facts About Gay People

Aziza Ahmed, Medical Evidence and Expertise in Abortion Jurisprudence

Elizabeth Kukura, Contested Care: The Politics of Research, Evidence and Knowledge in U.S. Childbirth Policies

 Discussants: Elizabeth MacDowell, Rachel Rebouche                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   FRIDAY, MAY 30

 Roundtable: Feminist Legal Theory Half a Century after the Second Wave

Moderator/Discussant:  Clare Huntington

Susan Appleton and Susan Stiritz, Legal Education Gone Wild: Law and Literature and Sex

Naomi Cahn and June Carbone, Unequal Terms

Max Eichner, Second-Wave Feminism and the Market

Jennifer Hendricks, Schrodinger’s Child: Non-Identity, Probability, and Reproductive Decision-Making

                  

The Economics of Intergenerational Care, Chair: Dirk Hartog 

 Alicia Kelly, Intergenerational Economies

Nina Kohn, Valuing Care

Peggie Smith, Compensating Family Members to Care for Elderly Relatives

Amy Ziettlow, “Money and Stuff:” Gen X Caregivers and Financial Decision-making for Their Baby Boomer Parents

 Discussant:  Naomi Cahn

 

 Roundtable:  Anniversary of Fineman’s Feminism and Legal Theory Project, Chair: Hila Keren

June Carbone, Univ. of Minnesota Law

Martha A. Fineman, Emory Law School

Michele Goodwin, Univ. of Minnesota Law

Fionnuala Ní Aoláin, Univ. of Minnesota Law School

Dorothy Roberts, Univ. of Pennsylvania Law School

Laura Spitz, Cornell Law School

Jessica Dixon Weaver, Southern Methodist Univ. Law School

 Discussant: Laura Kessler

 

Subordination and Power in Families, Chair:  Laura Kessler

 Samantha Godwin, A Feminist Critique of Parental Rights

Pamela Laufer-Ukeles, The Case Against Separating the Care from the Caregiver: A Relational Perspective on Children’s Rights

Aníbal Rosario Lebrón, Scorned Law: Rethinking Impeachment Rules for Battered Women

Sarah Swan, Third-Party Policing Comes Home: Gender, Control, and Responsibilization in Family Life

 Discussants: Wendy Bach, Laura Kessler, Rachel Rebouche

 

 Sexual Violence, Chair: Jessica Clarke 

 Mary Ann Franks, Men, Women, and Optimal Violence

Ummni Khan, Representing ‘John’: The Legal Reification of Sex Trade Clients and their Potential Status as Constitutional Subjects

Fionnuala Ní Aoláin, Gendered Harms and their Interface with International Criminal Law: Norms, Challenges, and Domestication

Menaka Raguparan, Consent/non Consent: Challenging Sexual Assault Law’s Generative Meaning  

Valarie Vojdik, Theorizing Violence Against Men

 Discussants: Neha Jain,Deborah Tuerkheimer, Bela August Walker

 

 Families and Family – New Books Exploring the Past and Imagining the Future

Chair: Laurie Kohn

Jill Hasday, Family Law Reimagined

Clare Huntington, Failure to Flourish: How Law Undermines Family Relationships 

Angela Onwuachi-Willig, According to Our Hearts: Rhinelander v. Rhinelander and the Law of the Multiracial Family

 Discussants: Katharine Bartlett,Robin Lenhardt

  

SATURDAY, MAY 31

 Parenting Outside of Marriage: The Legal History of Fathers’ Rights, Illegitimacy, and Child Custody from Blackstone to Reagan(co-sponsor Law and History), Chair/Discussant: Kristin Collins

Sarah Abramowicz, The Construction of Motherhood and the Regulation of Fatherhood in Early 19th-Century English Child Custody Law

Deborah Dinner, Liberated Patriarchs: The Fathers’ Rights Movement, 1960-1980

Serena Mayeri, Unmarried Fathers, Sex Equality, and Marital Supremacy, 1970-1983

Mary Ziegler, Illegitimate Conceptions: Unwed Motherhood and the Remaking of the Abortion Wars                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           

May 29, 2014 in Conferences, Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, May 16, 2014

Lavender Bar Conference and Job Fair

Prof. Courtney Joslin at UC Davis has asked me to post this, and I am pleased to do so:  

 

Lavender Law 2014, New York, NY

August 21-23, 2014

Invitation and Call for Papers

Entry-Level Market Forum for Junior Scholars

 

 

Dear Friends and Colleagues,

 

This year the Lavender Law® Conference & Career Fair will be heldAugust 21-23, 2014 at the Sheraton New York in New York City. Lavender Law brings together the best and brightest legal minds in the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community.

 

To celebrate our community of scholars, Lavender Law® is hosting a Junior Scholars Forum again this year. This year, the forum will be devoted to individuals who intend to participate in the AALS annual entry-level hiring conference in Washington, D.C. If you are planning to participate in the entry-level hiring process this year, and your work focuses on the nexus between the law, gender, and sexuality, we encourage you to apply.

 

To submit a proposal for consideration, please email (1) a 5-10 page overview of your job talk; and (2) a copy of your cv to Courtney Joslin (cgjoslin@ucdavis.edu) and Joseph Landau (jlandau4@law.fordham.edu).

 

The deadline for submissions is Friday, June 13, 2014.

 

If you are selected to participate, a complete draft of your job talk will be due by August 1, 2014.

 

May 16, 2014 in Conferences, LGBT | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, April 15, 2014

Feminist Legal Theory Panels at Law & Society Conference

Collaborative Research Network on Feminist Legal Theory
Law & Society 2014

Draft Program

WEDNESDAY, MAY 28

Book Discussion: Becoming Sexual by Danielle Egan
7 pm, University of Minnesota, Room TBA


THURSDAY, MAY 29

Alternatives to Marriage
Chair: June Carbone
8:15—10:00 am, Room

Erez Aloni, Beyond Recognition: Redistribution in Family Law
Jessica Feinberg, The Survival of Non-Marital Relationship Statuses in the Same-Sex Marriage Era: A Proposal
Leslie Harris, Drifting Toward Marriage: How and Why Legal Structures for Alternative Family Forms Converge on Marriage
Theodore Seto, A Coasian Theory of Marriage

Discussant: Kerry Abrams


Feminist Perspectives on Health Care
Chair: Kara Loewentheil
10:15—12:00 pm, Room

Jamie Abrams, Revealing the Illusion of Patient Autonomy and the Ghost of Roe's Medical Model
Kara Loewentheil, When Free Exercise Is A Burden: Protecting "Third Parties" In Religious Accommodation Law
Seema Mohapatra, Time to Lift the Veil of Inequality in Health Care Coverage: Using Corporate Law to Defend the Affordable Care Act’s Reproductive Health Care Mandate

Discussants: Jessica Waters, Margaux Hall

ART and Parentage
Chair: Wendy Bach
12:45—2:30 pm, Room

Courtney Joslin, The Biology Myth
Jody Madiera, The Legal Consequences of Infertility Patients’ Self-Identification as Consumer or Patient
Dara Purvis, Fathers, Abortion, and Equal Rights
Kara Swanson, Alternative Insemination and Adoption: Historical Perspectives

Discussant: Joanna Bond


Same Sex Marriage and Divorce
Chair: Rachel Rebouche
2:45—4:30 pm, Room

Cynthia Godsoe, Disentangling Marriage and Parenthood
Zvi Triger and Ayelet Blecher-Prigat, Same-Sex Divorce and the Right to Divorce
Ann Tweedy, Same-Sex Marriage and Indian Tribes
Deborah Widiss, Federal Marriage Discrimination, Take Two

Discussant: William Kuby


“Just the Facts:” Expertise and Empirical Evidence as Movement Strategies
Chair: Rachel Rebouche
4:45—6:15 pm, Room

Libby Adler, Facts About Gay People
Aziza Ahmed, Medical Evidence and Expertise in Abortion Jurisprudence
Elizabeth Kukura, Contested Care: The Politics of Research, Evidence and Knowledge in U.S. Childbirth Policies

Discussant: Elizabeth MacDowell


Business Meeting, 6:30—7:00, Hilton Board Room 3


FLT CRN Dinner, 7:00 pm, Rosa Mexicano, 609 Hennipen Avenue

RSVP for dinner is required: http://www.signupgenius.com/go/10C0B4AA8A62BA0FF2-annual

 

 

FRIDAY, MAY 30

Roundtable: Feminist Legal Theory Half a Century after the Second Wave
Moderator/Discussant: Clare Huntington
8:15 am—10:00 am, Room

Susan Appleton and Susan Stiritz, Legal Education Gone Wild: Law and Literature and Sex
Naomi Cahn and June Carbone, Unequal Terms
Max Eichner, Second-Wave Feminism and the Market
Jennifer Hendricks, Schrodinger's Child: Non-Identity, Probability, and Reproductive Decision-Making


The Economics of Intergenerational Care
(co-sponsor Aging, Law & Society)
Chair: Dirk Hartog
10:15—12:00 pm, Room

Alicia Kelly, Intergenerational Economies
Nina Kohn, Valuing Care
Peggie Smith, Compensating Family Members to Care for Elderly Relatives
Jessica Dixon Weaver, Of Babes & Elders: A Unified Approach to Intergenerational Caregiving
Amy Ziettlow, "Money and Stuff": Gen X Caregivers and Financial Decision-making for Their Baby Boomer Parents

Discussant: Naomi Cahn
Roundtable: Anniversary of Fineman’s Feminism and Legal Theory Project
Chair: Hila Keren
10:15—12:00 pm, Room

June Carbone, University of Minnesota
Martha A. Fineman, Emory Law School
Michele Goodwin, University of Minnesota
Fionnuala Ni Aolain, University of Minnesota Law School
Dorothy Roberts, University of Pennsylvania
Laura Spitz, Cornell Law School

Discussant: Laura Kessler


Subordination and Power in Families
Chair: Laura Kessler
12:45—2:30 pm, Room

Alesha Durfee, "They don’t want any problems": The effects of documentation status on the legal mobilization of domestic violence survivors
Samantha Godwin, A Feminist Critique of Parental Rights
Pamela Laufer-Ukeles, The Case Against Separating the Care from the Caregiver: A Relational Perspective on Children’s Rights
Aníbal Rosario Lebrón, Scorned Law: Rethinking Impeachment Rules for Battered Women
Sarah Swan, Third-Party Policing Comes Home: Gender, Control, and Responsibilization in Family Life


Sexual Violence
Chair: Jessica Clarke
2:45—4:30 pm, Room

Emma Cunliffe, Judgment and Error in Sexual Assault Trials
Mary Ann Franks, Men, Women, and Optimal Violence
Ummni Khan, Representing ‘John’: The Legal Reification of Sex Trade Clients and their Potential Status as Constitutional Subjects
Menaka Raguparan, Consent/non Consent: Challenging Sexual Assault Law’s Generative Meaning
Valarie Vojdik, Theorizing Violence Against Men

Discussant: Deborah Tuerkheimer


Families and Family Law – New Books Exploring the Past and Imagining the Future
Chair: Laurie Kohn
4:45—6:30 pm, Room

Authors:
Jill Hasday, University of Minnesota Law School, Family Law Reimagined
Clare Huntington, Fordham Law School, Failure to Flourish: How Law Undermines Family Relationships
Angela Onwuachi-Willig, University of Iowa College of Law, According to Our Hearts: Rhinelander v. Rhinelander and the Law of the Multiracial Family

Discussants:
Katharine Bartlett, Duke University School of Law
Robin Lenhardt, Fordham Law School


SATURDAY, MAY 31


Parenting Outside of Marriage 1800-Now (co-sponsor Law and History)
Chair/Discussant: Kristin Collins
2:45—4:30 pm, Room

Sarah Abramowicz, The Construction of Motherhood and the Regulation of Fatherhood in Early 19th-Century English Child Custody Law
Deborah Dinner, Liberated Patriarchs: The Fathers’ Rights Movement, 1960-1980
Serena Mayeri, Unmarried Fathers, Sex Equality, and Marital Supremacy, 1970-1983
Mary Ziegler, Illegitimate Conceptions: Unwed Motherhood and the Remaking of the Abortion Wars

April 15, 2014 in Conferences | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, March 13, 2014

AALS Workshop on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Issues

AALS Mid-Year Meeting, Thursday through Saturday | June 5 – 7, 2014 .  Looks like a terrific line-up.

Why Attend?

2013 was an important year for issues concerning sexual orientation and gender identity. The U.S. Supreme Court issued rulings in Hollingsworth v. Perry and U.S. v. Windsor  that have broad implications for sexual minorities, as does the earlier repeal of “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell.” But these developments have raised as many questions as they resolved, and the reverberations from them will continue to shape the landscape for many years. At the same time that marriage equality is spreading through the U.S. and other countries, many states and countries still retain laws that negatively impact sexual minorities and their families. The majority of countries in the world and half the states in the U.S. provide no protection against discrimination based on sexual minority status, and the federal government does not prohibit this discrimination. Bullying and suicide continue to plague LGBTQ youth, and religious liberty continues to be offered as a basis for discriminatory action. Additionally, scholars and activists are writing about sexual orientation and gender identity from many perspectives and challenging many of the constructs that limit individuals’ freedom to express their sexuality and identity in creative, autonomous  ways.

 

March 13, 2014 in Conferences, Gender, Law schools, LGBT | Permalink | Comments (0)