Monday, May 5, 2014

Trans Bodies, Trans Selves

From the Advocate:  

A new book, five years in the making, hopes to provide one of the most comprehensive and up-to-date resource on the complex and often misunderstood issues affecting trans individuals.

And: 

Due out later this year from Oxford University Press, Trans Bodies, Trans Selves looks to be the most comprehensive trans resource ever published. The book features more than 200 contributors, and covers topics like the gender spectrum, trans history, health, cultural and social topics, and gender theory.

More:  

Weighing in at 672-pages, the Associated Press describes the book as, "Encyclopedic in scope, conversational in tone, and candid about complex sexual issues." After nearly five years in the making, the text hopes to impact a much-maligned and misunderstood community at a critical point in its history.

May 5, 2014 in Books, LGBT, Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, May 2, 2014

Generation Kill by Evan Wright

I am only about half through with Evan Wright's fantastic book.  (Alas, I am six years late in reading it, and having never known that there was an HBO series based on it.)  Wright was a reporter for Rolling Stone and he was embedded with a Marine Recon unit (the Marine version of the Navy SEALS).  The somewhat poorly titled Generation Kill (the book contains poignant episodes of humanity and moving affect) is Wright's account of that time. 

The writing, plain and unpretentious, reminds me of Tim O'Brien's fine work, but it seems, in places, even more prescient and subtlely interesting than O'Brien's much lauded books.  Wright captures well the paradoxes, contradictions and deeply tender moments of male bonding and manliness, as forged in the harshest of circumstances.  

May 2, 2014 in Books, Manliness, Masculinities | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, April 29, 2014

Book Review: Presumed Incompetent

Maria Lopez (Loyola, New Orleans) and Kevin Johnson (Davis) have posted Presumed Incompetent: Important Lessons for University Leaders on the Professional Lives of Women Faculty of Color, Berkeley J. Gender, Law & Justice (forthcoming).

Academics have long known that the experiences of women faculty members of color differ in important respects from those of any other faculty members. Adding significantly to that body of knowledge, Presumed Incompetent: The Intersections of Race and Class for Women in Academia edited by Professors Angela P. Harris and Carmen Gonzalez in a collection of essays of different voices offers important lessons for scholars, university administrators and leaders, faculty members, and, for that matter, students interested in the experiences of women of color in academia. People of good faith who want to “do the right thing” may find it difficult to read the unsettling stories and pleas for empathy, internalize the lessons as based on common occurrences rather than outlier experiences, and consider how to address and redress the issues. Still, we as a collective have the obligation and responsibility to think about what might be done to improve the day-to-day lives of the next generation of women faculty of color.

 

To that end, this review essay directs attention at one chapter of the volume, which offers invaluable commentary and perspective on the other chapters and provides many lessons for university leaders hoping to make a positive difference. This is terrain where one might expect two minority law school deans (and faculty members) to feel most comfortable. In addition, as people of color with real life experience with these issues, we hope to provide insights that help university leaders to better appreciate, grapple with, and attempt to effectively address the concerns of women faculty of color

April 29, 2014 in Books, Law schools, Race | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

gender stereotypes persist in children's books

View image on Twitter

 

Here's a terrific article (anyone who is dubious of its claims is welcome to visit their nearest Barnes and Noble this weekend and to peruse the children's section).  It begins:  

The Let Toys Be Toys campaign, which last year persuaded 13 retailers to remove “Boys” and “Girls” signs from stores, is working with Letterbox LibraryInclusive Minds and For Books’ Sake to persuade the publishing industry to drop these labels from books. The Let Books Be Books petition launched for World Book Day, 6 March, asks children’s publishers Usborne, Buster Books, Igloo Books and others to stop labelling children’s activity, story and colouring books as for boys or for girls.

More: 

Typical themes for boys include robots, dinosaurs, astronauts, vehicles, football and pirates; while girls are allowed princesses, fairies, make-up, flowers, butterflies, fashion and cute animals. There’s nothing wrong with these things, but it is wrong when they are repeatedly presented as only for one gender. Girls can like pirates and adventure, boys can like magic and dressing up. Why tell them otherwise? Why tell them that boys and girls should like different things, that their interests never overlap, that there are greater differences between genders than between individuals? 

View image on Twitter

April 23, 2014 in Books | Permalink | Comments (0)

book reviews are usually written by....men

The story in the NYT, now a tad old in blogsphere terms, starts:

Reading a book review in a well-known periodical? Chances are, the byline belongs to a man.

In its annual count of male and female bylines in book reviews, magazines and literary journals, VIDA, a women’s literary organization, revealed that in 2013, the publications still largely favored men over women.

More: 

At The New York Review of Books, there were 212 male book reviewers and 52 female; at The Atlantic, there were 14 male book reviewers and three female; at Harper’s, there were 24 male book reviewers and 10 female.

 

April 23, 2014 in Books, Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, April 19, 2014

Books: The New Soft War on Women

From the Boston Globe, Authors Work to Reveal Hidden Gender Bias

Judging from the media buzz, women appear to be racing to the top of the corporate ladder. Books trumpet the “end of men” and wives taking over as breadwinners, articles tout the success of female executives at General Motors and Yahoo, charts show women earning the majority of advanced degrees.

But authors Caryl Rivers and Rosalind Barnett were certain the picture wasn’t as rosy as it seemed. So they pored over mountains of research done on working women and turned their not-so-rosy findings into a book, “The New Soft War on Women: How the Myth of Female Ascendance Is Hurting Women, Men — and our Economy.”

Women are still discriminated against in the workplace, they say, but the discrimination has become harder to detect, hidden in subtle biases such as mothers being seen as less dedicated to their work and less deserving of raises or promotions.

“It’s not people firing bullets dead at your chest,” said Rivers. “The landmines are buried.”

April 19, 2014 in Books, Workplace | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, April 12, 2014

Book Review: Mayeri on How Sex Became a Civil Liberty

Leigh Ann Wheeler's  book on the ACLU and privacy and reproductive rights is one of my recent favorites.  Impeccable research, well-written, and surprising recoveries.

Serena Mayeri reviews the book in Sex and Civil Liberties

April 12, 2014 in Books, Reproductive Rights | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, March 15, 2014

Spring Break Reading on Gender

Yes, this is my idea of fun for spring break.  Better on a beach, but the couch works too. 

Myra MacPhearson, The ScarletSisters: Sex, Suffrage and Scandal in the Gilded Age (2014)  A new look at 19th century feminism and craziness of Victoria Woodhull and her sister.

Brigid Shulte, Overwhelmed: Work, Love and Play When No One Has the Time (2014). How did life get so crazy?  And why are women still doing all the housework?

Got anymore recommendations?

 

                        

 

 

March 15, 2014 in Books | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, March 6, 2014

Women's Legal History: A Reading List

As we begin women’s history month, I thought I would share a women’s legal history reading list. I've  developed this list over the last decade with what I think are the seminal articles and books on particular topics, used in connection with my own research and for teaching a Women's Legal History seminar.  This foundational work is critical to filling in the gendered gaps of the conventional history, and it is also just plain interesting.  It's interesting that Florence Kelley was responsible for the Brandeis brief and the use of social science in legal argument; that abortion in the first trimester was legal fro a century until 1865; that some leading women’s rights advocates like Elizabeth Cady Stanton pushed for no-fault divorce in the 1860s and that feminists in the 1970s were largely absent from the no-fault divorce reform; that women lay lawyers invented legal aid lawyering and problem-solving courts; that female advocates and reformers challenged the marital rape exemption 100 years before need for change first “discovered” in the 1970s.  The list goes on and on.  My hope is that one day these "women's" topics will be mainstreamed into traditional wisdom as embodied everywhere from constitutional law texts to high school history books.  But for now, at least, the history is being recovered and analzyed, and the transmission of that discovery has been started. 

 

Women’s Legal History: A Reading List

Tracy A. Thomas

 

General

Tracy Thomas & Tracey Jean Boisseau, Eds., Feminist Legal History (NYU Press 2011)

Linda Kerber, No Constitutional Right to Be Ladies: Women and the Obligations of Citizenship (1999)

Joan Hoff, Law, Gender & Injustice: A Legal History of US Women (1994)

Felice Batlan, Engendering Legal History, 30 Law & Soc. Inquiry 823 (2005)

Tracy A. Thomas, The New Face of Women’s Legal History, 41 Akron L. Rev. 695 (2008).

Understanding Feminism

Martha Chammallas, Introduction to Feminist Legal Theory (2d ed. 2003)

Nancy Levit, Robert Verchick, & Martha Minow, Feminist Legal Theory: A Primer (2006)

Joan Williams, Unbending Gender: Why Family and Work Conflict and What to do About it (2000)

Nancy Cott, The Grounding of Modern Feminism (1987)

Louise Michele Newman, White Women’s Rights: The Racial Origins of Feminism in the United States 5 (1999)

Tracy Thomas, The Beecher Sisters as Nineteenth-Century Icons of the Sameness-Difference Debate, 11 Cardozo Women's L. J. 107 (2004)

EEOC v. Sears, 628 F. Supp. 1264 (N.D. Ill. 1986), 839 F.2d 302 (7th Cir. 1988)

Haskell & Levison, Historians and the Sears Case, 66 Tex. L. Rev. 1629 (1988)

Colonial Period

Mary Beth Norton, Founding Mothers and Fathers: Gendered Power and the Forming of America Society (1997) (Anne Hutchinson trial, jury of matrons)

Kristin Collins, “Petitions Without Number”: Widows’ Petitions and the Early Nineteenth-Century Origins of Marriage-Based Entitlements, 31 Law & History Rev. 1 (2012)

Mary Beth Norton, In the Devil’s Snare: The Salem Witchcraft Crisis of 1692 (2003)

Jane Campbell Moriarty, Wonders of the Invisible World, 26 Vt. L. Rev. 43 (2001)

Peter Hoff, The Salem Witchcraft Trials: A Legal History (1997)

Coverture, Marital Status in the Family, Marital Property

William Blackstone, Commentaries on the Law of England, Of Husband and Wife (1769)

Norma Basch, In the Eyes of the Law: Women, Marriage, and Property in Nineteenth Century New York (1982)

Richard Chused, Married Women’s Property Law:1800-1850, 71 Georgetown L.J.1359 (1983)

Tracy A. Thomas, Elizabeth Cady Stanton on the Marriage Amendment: A Letter to the President, 22 Const. Comment. 137 (2005)

Reva Siegel, Home as Work: The First Woman’s Rights Claims Concerning Wives’ Household Labor, 1850-1880, 103 Yale L J. 1073 (1994)

Ariela R. Dubler, Governing Through Contract: Common Law Marriage in the Nineteenth Century,” 107 Yale Law J.1885 (1998).

Jill Hasday, Contest and Consent: A Legal History of Marital Rape, 88 Cal. L. Rev. 1373 (2000)

Naomi Cahn, Faithless Wives and Lazy Husbands: Gender Norms in Nineteenth-Century Divorce Law, 2002 U. Ill. L. Rev. 651

Ken Burns, Not For Ourselves Alone:  The Story of Elizabeth Cady Stanton & Susan B. Anthony (video)

 Suffrage

Declaration of Sentiments, July 1848

History of Woman Suffrage, v.I (Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, Matilda Joslyn Gage, eds)

Nancy Isenberg, Sex and Citizenship in Antebellum America (1998)

Ellen DuBois, Outgrowing the Compact of our Fathers: Equal Rights, Woman Suffrage, and the US Constitution, 1820-1878, 74 J. Amer. History 836 (1987)

Doug Linder’s Famous Trials Website, The Trial of Susan B. Anthony (including trial documents)

Minor v. Happersett, 88 U.S. 162 (1974)

Rosalyn Terborg-Penn, African American Women in the Struggle for the Vote, 1850-1920 (1998)

Iron Jawed Angels (2004) (video)

Reva Siegel, She the People: The Nineteenth Amendment, Sex Equality, Federalism, and the Family, 115 Harv. L. Rev. 945 (2002)

Labor

Felice Batlan, Notes from the Margins: Florence Kelley and the Making of Sociological Jurisprudence, in Transformations in American Legal History: Law, Ideology, and Methods (Daniel Hamilton & Alfred Brophy 2010)

Nancy Woloch, Muller v. Oregon: A Brief History with Documents (1996)

Muller v. Oregon, 208 US 412 (1908)

Adkins v. Children's Hospital, 261 US 525 (1923)

The Triangle Shirtwaist Fire Article, 7 Green Bag 2d. 397 (2004)

 Reproductive Rights

Reva Siegel, Reasoning from the Body: A Historical Perspective on Abortion Regulation and Questions of Equal Protection, 44 Stan. L. Rev. 261 (1992)

James Mohr, Abortion in America: The Origins and Evolution of National Policy (1979)

Tracy A. Thomas, Misappropriating Women’s History in the Law and Politics of Abortion, 36 Seattle L. Rev.1 (2013)

Linda Gordon, The Moral Property of Women: A History of Birth Control Politics in America (2000)

Linda Greenhouse & Reva Siegel, Before Roe v. Wade (2010)

Leigh Ann Wheeler, How Sex Became a Civil Liberty (2012)

Equality

Sarah Grimke, Letters on the Equality of the Sexes and the Condition of Women in The Feminist Papers (Alice Rossi, ed. 1973).

Serena Mayeri, A New ERA or a New Era? Amendment Advocacy and the Reconstitution of Feminism, 103 Nw. U. L. Rev. 1223 (2009)

Serena Mayeri, Reasoning from Race: Feminism, Law, and the Civil Rights Revolution (2011)

Deborah Brake, Revisiting Title IX's Feminist Legacy, 12 Am.U.J. Gender, L.& Soc. Pol.462 (2004)

Deborah Brake, Title IX as Pragmatic Feminism, 55 Clev. State L. Rev. 513 (2008)

Jill Hasday, Fighting Women: The Military, Sex, and Extrajudicial Constitutional Change, 93 Minn. L. Rev. 96 (2008).

Pregnancy Discrimination

Cleveland Board of Ed. v. LaFleur, 414 U.S. 632 (1974)

Deborah Dinner, Recovering the LaFleur Doctrine, 22 Yale J.L. & Fem. 343 (2010)

Tracy Thomas, The Struggle for Gender Equality in the Northern District of Ohio, in Justice on the Shores of Lake Erie: A History of the Northern District of Ohio (Paul Finkelman & Roberta eds. 2012)

 Employment

Pauli Murray, Jane Crow and the Law: Sex Discrimination and Title VII, 43 G.W. Law Rev. 232 (1965)

Emma Coleman Jordan, Race, Gender and Social Class in the Thomas Sexual Harassment Hearings, 15 Harv. Women's L.J. 1 (1992)

Carrie Baker, The Woman’s Movement Against Sexual Harassment (2007)

 Women in the Courts

Marina Angel, Teaching Susan Glaspell's A Jury of Her Peers and Trifles, 53 J. Legal Educ. 548 (2003)

Joanna Grossman, Women's Jury Service: Right of Citizenship or Privilege of Difference?, 46 Stan. L. Rev. 1115 (1994)

Felice Batlan, The Birth of Legal Aid: Gender Ideologies, Women, and the Bar in New York City, 1863-1910, 28 Law & History Rev. 931 (2010).

Viriginia Drachman, Sisters in Law: Women Lawyers in Modern American History (2001)

Bradwell v. State, 83 U.S. 130 (1872)

In re Lockwood, 154 U.S. 116 (1894)

Women’s Legal History Biography Project, at http://wlh.law.stanford.edu

 

 

March 6, 2014 in Books, Law schools, Legal History | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, February 20, 2014

New in Books: Women in the Welfare Rights Movement

Mary Triece (Akron-Communication) has published Tell it Like it Is: Women in the National Welfare Rights Movement (SC Press 2013).

In Tell It Like It Is, Mary E. Triece brings to light a lesser known yet influential social movement of the late 1960s and early 1970s—the welfare rights movement, led and run largely by poor black mothers in the National Welfare Rights Organization (NWRO). Her study combines theory and critical analysis to explore rhetorical strategies and direct actions women employed as they argued for fair welfare legislation in both formal policy debates and in the streets. Triece focuses on how welfare recipients spoke for themselves in forums often marked by widely held stereotypes.

 

Triece explains the influence of racism on welfare legislation throughout the early 1900s and explores how welfare recipients cultivated agency while challenging stereotypes such as the "welfare cheat" and the "welfare mother." To illuminate her study, Triece uses historical documents including pamphlets, flyers, position statements, and convention materials. She examines the official newspaper of the NWRO, the Welfare Fighter, and draws on the congressional testimonies of welfare recipients, providing the first in-depth look at the ways that these women represented themselves in this formal political forum.

 

Tell It Like It Is presents an interdisciplinary study touching on communication, rhetoric, politics, feminist theory, and the intersections of race, class, gender, and sexuality. It also engages in ongoing scholarly debate regarding language, knowledge, reality, and the potential for social change. Triece contributes to each of these disciplines as she explores how a marginalized and beleaguered people managed to mobilize a nationwide movement.

 

February 20, 2014 in Books, Legal History | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, February 18, 2014

Redefining Rape

Finally, completing today's thoughts on writing great and relevant legal scholarship, a perfect example.

Manufacturing Consent: Estelle B. Freedman's "Redefining Rape"

 

The LA Times has Annie Shield's review of Estelle Freedman, (Stanford) Redefining Rape: Sexual Violence in the Era of Suffrage and Segregation

The evolution of how rape has been defined in the United States is the subject of the historian Estelle B. Freedman’s Redefining Rape: Sexual Violence in the Era of Suffrage and Segregation. In this book, Freedman tells the story of the many disparate social movements whose efforts brought about changes in the social and legal constructions of rape from the end of the Civil War until the early 20th century. Not unlike the “Rape is Rape” campaign, most efforts to redefine rape throughout the country’s history have relied on both long-term organizing and unpredictable shifts in the political climate. The impact of anti-rape activism, like that of all movements for social change, is influenced by the fickle public attention span. The FBI’s decision to discard the category of “forcible rape” in favor of a more inclusive definition of assault was a big victory, but it went largely unnoticed by the public. Getting people to sign on was easy, but getting the media to cover an esoteric definitional change by a bureaucratic agency was a struggle. ...

Freedman’s thesis is a simple one: throughout the history of the term “rape,” its changing definition has been inextricably bound to changing definitions of citizenship. She traces the evolution of rape as a social and political concept from the end of the Civil War to the mid-20th century. Through historical records, court transcripts, and newspaper archives, Freedman shows how, since the country’s founding, ideas about sexual violence have traditionally been informed — and enforced — by and for a ruling class of white men. She also outlines the history of anti-rape movements that challenged white supremacy and male supremacy. The presentation of these disparate movements, which were often at odds with one another despite having seemingly similar goals, is among the most fascinating aspects of Freedman’s narrative.

 

 

 

 

February 18, 2014 in Books, Legal History, Violence Against Women | Permalink | Comments (0)

Finding the Right Writer's Spot

I'm thinking a lot today about what we do as law professors as scholarship.  Several posts about writing, both it's inspiration and relevance.  From the NYT, here's about how to find a perfect writing niche location. The Writer's Room.  For me, its a room of one's own and a room with a view. 

February 18, 2014 in Books, Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, February 11, 2014

Sexual Orientation Bibliography

A colleague directed my attention to a fabulously useful bibliography--with active links to articles--about LGBT legal issues: 

http://www.lgbtbib.org/index.php

 

February 11, 2014 in Books, LGBT, Same-sex marriage, Scholarship, Theory | Permalink | Comments (0)

Women's Segregation in the Workplace

From Kevin Stainback (Purdue-sociology) & Donald Tomaskovic-Devey(UMass-Amherst-sociology), Many American Workplaces are Becoming More Segregated in the Washington Post.

The results of our research found in part that there has been a trend toward racial re-segregation among white men and black men since 2000 and increased segregation since 1970 between black women and white women in American workplaces — so much so that it has eliminated progress made in the late 1960s.

***

Where has there been progress? In general, African Americans tend to do better in workplaces that use formal credentials to make hiring decisions. Minorities and white women have made the most progress in professional jobs. These occupations require specific educational credentials to be considered for employment. African Americans also progress in those relatively rare large, private-sector firms that monitor their managers diversity track record

February 11, 2014 in Books, Workplace | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, January 30, 2014

What We're Reading: Ballots, Babies and Peace

This is why I love women's history - there is just always more to the story.  The Untold Story of Jewish Feminist Pioneers provides a Q&A with Historian Melissa R. Klapper who recently won a National Jewish Book Award for Ballots, Babies, and Banners of Peace: American Jewish Women’s Activism, 1890-1940.    Klapper's book discusses the birth control battles of the 1870s, the Jewish push for suffrage, and why peace was once considered a women's issue.

 

 

January 30, 2014 in Books, Legal History | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, January 28, 2014

Williams on Playing the Femininity Card at Work

Joan Williams (Hastings) previews her new book, What Works for Women at Work in the Washington Post.

I'm always a big fan of Williams' work.  But I'm not thrilled with what she finds here.  Frankly, it's a pretty depressing view of the work world.  She finds that women still have to play the femininity card in order to be successful in the work place.  Her research suggest that women need to soft sell their ideas and leadership in a "feminine" nurturing kind of gentle way rather than be critical or assertive.   Or in another post, the suggestion is that women need to strike a power pose like Beyonce or Wonder Woman (seriously ? with or withou bustier?).  When can women just be normal?  That would be a revolution. 

January 28, 2014 in Books, Business, Women lawyers, Workplace | Permalink | Comments (1)

Thursday, January 23, 2014

Rethinking Domestic Violence

Aya Gruber (Colorado) in Rethinking Domestic Violence, Rethinking Violence comments on Leigh Goodmark's (Baltimore)  book, A Troubled Marriage: Domestic Violence and the Legal System.

January 23, 2014 in Books, Violence Against Women | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, January 21, 2014

Opting Back In

From Bernie Jones (Suffolk), The-Opt Out Revolution, Ten Years Later.

Ten years ago, the New York Times Magazinepublished Lisa Belkin’s controversial (and now infamous) article, “The Opt-Out Revolution.” In it, Belkin argued that young women were increasingly disinterested in feminist gains in the workplace. These women were interested instead in being married and becoming stay-at-home mothers, taking care of the house and children while their husbands worked. Much hand wringing followed, as it seemed the women’s movement had been stalled in the wake of Generation X’s rejection of their Baby Boomer mothers’ efforts.

 

Ten years later, the opt-out generation wants back in, as their realities have changed since they left the workforce.

Jones' book is  Women Who Opt Out: The Debate over Working Mothers and Work-Family Balance (NYU Press, 2012).

January 21, 2014 in Books, Workplace | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, January 18, 2014

What We're Reading

My weekend read is Sue Monk Kidd's new book, The Invention of Wings.  (Kidd the author of The Secret Life of Bees and the classic feminist theological memoir, The Dance of the Dissident Daughter).  

NPR's Book Review Finding Flight in "The Invention of Wings" says:

In simple terms, the book is the fictionalized history of the Grimké sisters, Sarah and Angelina (Nina), who were at the forefront of the abolitionist and women's rights movements, wound around the intriguing narrative of a young slave, Hetty, who was given to Sarah as an 11th birthday present. Sarah despises slavery, even at that early age, and out of principle attempts to reject the gift....

 

The novel is a textured masterpiece, quietly yet powerfully poking our consciences and our consciousness. What does it mean to be a sister, a friend, a woman, an outcast, a slave? How do we use our talents to better ourselves and our world? How do we give voice to our power, or learn to empower our voice?

The reviewer notes that she was "appalled that I had never heard of the Grimkés before, and thank the author sincerely for allowing me to make their acquaintance."  

The Grimke Sisters  were among the first female public abolitionist speakers.  Their testimony was particularly powerful as they recounted first-hand witnessing of slavery as daughters of a slaveholding family in South Carolina.  Sarah Grimke was arguably the first advocate for women's rights in her Letters on the Equality of the Sexes (1837).

 

January 18, 2014 in Books | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, December 28, 2013

Reading Women, Feminists, and Law...for Fun

It's Winter Break, and what that means to me is ... it's time to READ.  For Fun.  

Top of the stack from Santa is Lisa Scottoline's, Accused, reviving the all-female law firm as they battle crime and the law.  Though my all-time Scottoline favorite is Daddy's Girl (terrible title) which beautifully captures the experience of a first-year female law professor.  Next in line is law professor Alafair Burke's (Hofstra), Never Tell though her If You Were Here is a Amazon top mystery book of the year.  

For some other ideas, see Feminist Reads for the Holidays and Beyond

December 28, 2013 in Books | Permalink | Comments (0)