Saturday, February 28, 2015

Reviewing the new book "The Legacy of Ruth Bader Ginsburg"

Barbara Babcock, Book Review: Law Professor, Feminist, and Jurist Extraordinaire

Scott Dodson, editor, The Legacy of Ruth Bader Ginsburg,Cambridge University Press, 2015 (336 pp., cloth, $29.99)

 

Scott Dodson, the editor of this volume, has brought together an impressive group of law professors, lawyers, historians, and journalists to write about Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s legacy. There are sixteen essays, each devoted to different periods of her life and work, with very little overlap in the coverage, and no real conflict of interpretation. In addition to Dodson’s own essay, the book includes contributions by, among others, Thomas Goldstein,Lani GuinierRobert KatzmannHerma Hill KayLinda Kerber,Dahlia LithwickNeil and Reva SiegelNina Totenberg, and Joan Williams.

 

February 28, 2015 in Books | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, February 5, 2015

Gendered Dress

Susan Azyndar (Ohio State) reviews Ruthann Robson's (CUNY) book, Dressing Constitutionally: Hierarchy, Sexuality, and Democracy from Our Hairstyles to Our Shoes, in 106 Law Library J. 3 (2014).

In Dressing Constitutionally: Hierarchy, Sexuality, and Democracy from Our Hairstyles to Our Shoes, Robson explores these concepts through a variety of intersections between law and clothing. Her central thesis is twofold: “the Constitution cabins, channels, and constrains” our sartorial choices, even as our “attire reflects the Constitution” (p.7). Hierarchy, sexuality, and democracy underlie this relationship and our thinking about it. The book aims to elucidate the “doctrinal incoherence” and “interpretive slovenliness” underlying judicial reasoning (p.3). ¶88 Each chapter examines a constellation of legal concerns, including professional dress, undress, and the labor and economics of clothing production. The first chapter, “Dressing Historically,” traces the relationship between clothing and the law through history, beginning with Tudor sumptuary laws. The remaining chapters present a wide range of legal topics. For example, in the chapter entitled “Dressing Barely,” Robson addresses strip searches, indecent exposure, obscenity, and nudism. Legal concepts addressed include separation of powers, federalism, First Amendment rights, the Slavery Clauses, due process, equal protection, the Commerce Claus

NPR, Female Husbands in the 19th Century

Questions of gender identity are nothing new. Way before Transparent and Chaz Bonoand countless other popular culture stepping stones to where we are now regarding gender identity, there were accounts of "female husbands."

 

Stories of women dressing and posing as men dot the journalistic landscape of 19th century America — and Great Britain — according to Sarah Nicolazzo, who teaches literary history at the University of California, San Diego.

For a fictionalized history of cross-dresser Jenny Bonnet, read Frog Music.

 

February 5, 2015 in Books, Gender | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, February 3, 2015

Breakthrough New Book on Cyber-Sexual Harassment

Robin West (Georgetown) in Cyber-Sexual Harassment at JOTWELL reviews Danielle Citron's (Maryland) book, Hate Crimes in Cyberspace (Harvard Press 2014).

Danielle Citron’s Hate Crimes in Cyberspace is a breakthrough book. It has been compared, and with good reason, to Catherine MacKinnon’s Sexual Harassment of Working WomenThe book makes three major contributions. All are central to furthering the equality of women and men both in cyberspace and elsewhere.

 

First, Citron convincingly catalogues the range of harms, and their profundity, done to many women and some men by the sexual threats, the defamation, the revenge pornography, the stalking, and the sexual harassment and abuse, all of which is facilitated by the internet. ***

 

The second contribution, and the bulk of the book—the middle third to half—is a legal analysis of these harms. Citron begins by comparing the current status quo regarding our understanding of gendered harms in cyberspace with the legal environment surrounding domestic violence and sexual harassment thirty or twenty years ago. ***

 

The third contribution, and last third of the book, is her discussion of possible objections, and then her turn to extra-legal reforms, with a particularly helpful focus on the roles of educators, parents, and the providers themselves (“Silicon Valley” for short).

February 3, 2015 in Books, Technology, Violence Against Women | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, January 31, 2015

Interview with the Author of the New Book "The Legacy of Ruth Bader Ginsburg"

Nancy Leong (Denver) interviews Scott Dodson (Hastings) about his new book on Justice Ginsburg on YouTube, TheRightsCast: The Legacy of Ruth Bader Ginsburg (Jan. 27, 2015). 

From the abstract:

In Episode 1 of The RightsCast, Professor Scott Dodson discusses his new book, "The Legacy of Ruth Bader Ginsburg." The book includes contributions by Nina Totenberg (NPR), Dahlia Lithwick (Slate), Judge Robert Katzmann (Chief Judge, Second Circuit), Tom Goldstein (SCOTUSblog), and a number of prominent legal academics.

View Professor Dodson's faculty homepage here: http://www.uchastings.edu/academics/f...

Professor Dodson's book, "The Legacy of Ruth Bader Ginsburg," is available here: http://www.amazon.com/The-Legacy-Ruth...

 

January 31, 2015 in Books, Women lawyers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, January 27, 2015

Flex Time Key to Retaining Women to Firm Partner

ABA J, At Several DC Firms, More Women Than Men Promoted to Partner

Though women lawyers are outnumbered by males in partnerships at large law firms, they made strides at several law firms in Washington, D.C., in recent promotions.

Out of 35 law firms that announced the promotions of partners since October, 14 promoted as many or more females than men in Washington, D.C., theNational Law Journal (sub. req.) reports. In many cases, the proportion of women promoted to partner was greater in a law firm’s D.C. offices than in other locations.

Arent Fox promoted four lawyers nationally and all were women, the story says. Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld promoted five lawyers to partner in Washington, D.C., and four were women.

Leaders of Arent Fox and Akin Gump told the National Law Journal that flexible work schedules help the firms retain and promote women. At Akin Gump, three of the four women lawyers promoted in D.C. have worked reduced hours and will continue to do so as partners.

January 27, 2015 in Books, Work/life | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, December 30, 2014

Mansplaning Dominates Non-fiction Books

Bookforum: Mansplanation Nation

If mansplaining means “to comment on or explain something to a woman in a condescending, overconfident, and often inaccurate or oversimplified manner,” then O’Reilly clearly sees America as a suggestible (though fortunately profligate) woman in desperate need of a seemingly limitless amount of remedial mansplanation. And to be fair, if the most popular nonfiction books are a reliable guide, Americans crave mansplaining the way starving rats crave half-eaten hamburgers. We’d like Beck—not an education professor—to mansplain the Common Core to us. We want Malcolm Gladwell—not a neuroscientist or a sociologist or psychologist—to mansplain everything from the laws of romantic attraction to epidemiology. And we want O’Reilly—not an actual historian—to mansplain Lincoln, Kennedy, Jesus, and all of the other great mansplaining icons of history. We want mansplainers mansplaining other mansplainers. We dig hot mansplainer-on-mansplainer action.***

 

The easiest explanation is that a newly enfeebled America craves mansplanations and shuns humility. Humility conjures falling stock prices and ineffectual wars and citizens who don’t feel proud so much as desperate, and maybe even a little embarrassed—by Enron, by Katrina, by Ferguson, by the 101 cruel missteps of the past two decades. Humility is a woman thing, and by the hectoring logic of our mansplaining franchises, woman things are almost always embarrassing and bad. Novels by women are chick lit. Essays by women are “girl-friendly tales.” Professional journalists are mommy bloggers. Man things deserve shiny hardcovers and pride of place on the coffee table. Woman things get flimsy covers with cursive writing and a leopard-print high heel illustrated on them, and they’re shoved into purses and nightstand drawers. Humility and self-reflection are for the weak or silly.

December 30, 2014 in Books | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, December 25, 2014

Happy Holidays

Courtesy of the Akron Law Library.

Embedded image permalink

December 25, 2014 in Books, Law schools | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, December 20, 2014

Writing Her Own Way

An inspiring story of writing.  NYT, The Unbreakable Laura Hillenbrand.  There's not only one way to research and write.  And sometimes the path least traveled turns out to be best. 

December 20, 2014 in Books | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, December 13, 2014

Books on Law this Season

Whether you're gift-giving or ready to settle down for a nice winter's nap (with book), here are some books in law that might be of interest. 

The Divorce Papers [h/t Molly McBurney]

Supreme Ambitions

List from Legal History Blog  

December 13, 2014 in Books | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, December 9, 2014

History of the First Anti-Sex Trafficking Law

From Legal History Blog, New Release: Pliley, Policing Sexuality: The Mann Act and the Making of the FBI

New from Harvard University Press: Policing Sexuality: The Mann Act and the Making of the FBI (Nov. 2014), by Jessica R. Pliley(Texas State University). A description from the Press:

 

America’s first anti–sex trafficking law, the 1910 Mann Act, made it illegal to transport women over state lines for prostitution “or any other immoral purpose.” It was meant to protect women and girls from being seduced or sold into sexual slavery. But, as Jessica Pliley illustrates, its enforcement resulted more often in the policing of women’s sexual behavior, reflecting conservative attitudes toward women’s roles at home and their movements in public. By citing its mandate to halt illicit sexuality, the fledgling Bureau of Investigation gained entry not only into brothels but also into private bedrooms and justified its own expansion.

 

December 9, 2014 in Books, Violence Against Women | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, November 6, 2014

"Wonder Woman remade feminism."

Claims Jill Lepore.  For an excellent review, see Slate Invisible Airplane, Meet Glass Ceiling

 

 

November 6, 2014 in Books, Gender | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, November 1, 2014

Books: Joan Biskupic's "Breaking In" Biography of Justice Sonia Sotomayor

Slate, Disagree in Good Faith?: Sonia Sotomayor Pushes Other Supreme Court Justices Past Their Comfort Zones, reviewing Joan Biskupic’s new biography of Sotomayor, Breaking In

Joan Biskupic’s new biography of Sonia Sotomayor, Breaking In, opens with a telling story from the justice’s first year on the Supreme Court. At a party celebrating the end of the term, Sotomayor decided to shake up the staid affair. After the law clerks put on a series of “tame” skits, she informed them that their performance “lacked a certain something.” She signaled a clerk, who produced a stereo. When Latin music began filling the room, before the clerks, her colleagues, and 200 staff members, the newest member of the court began to salsa.

 

That would certainly have been enough to make the occasion memorable, but Sotomayor wasn’t done. One by one, Biskupic writes, “she beckoned the justices” to join her. They were resistant, she was determined. “I knew she’d be trouble,” Justice Antonin Scalia quipped when the dance off was over.

November 1, 2014 in Books, Women lawyers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, October 18, 2014

Books: A History of Women in Law and Lawmaking in Europe

Eva Schandevyl (Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium), ed., Women in Law and Lawmaking in Nineteenth and Twentieth Century Europe (Sept. 2014)

Exploring the relationship between gender and law in Europe from the nineteenth century to present, this collection examines the recent feminisation of justice, its historical beginnings and the impact of gendered constructions on jurisprudence. It looks at what influenced the breakthrough of women in the judicial world and what gender factors determine the position of women at the various levels of the legal system.


Every chapter in this book addresses these issues either from the point of view of women's legal history, or from that of gendered legal cultures. With contributions from scholars with expertise in the major regions of Europe, this book demonstrates a commitment to a methodological framework that is sensitive to the intersection of gender theory, legal studies and public policy, and that is based on historical methodologies. As such the collection offers a valuable contribution both to women's history research, and the wider development of European legal history.

October 18, 2014 in Books, International, Legal History | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, October 11, 2014

NYT Special Ed Book Review: Women and Power

New York Times: Books

What books would you have reviewed here?

October 11, 2014 in Books | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, September 20, 2014

New Books: Florence Kelley and Worker Protection Legislation

Leigh Bienen, Florence Kelley and the Children: Factory Inspector in 1890s Chicago (2014)

A new book by a Northwestern University School of Law scholar aims to fill in the gaps in all that has been written about Florence Kelley—focusing particularly on the somewhat neglected decade the late 19th-century advocate for women and children spent in Chicago.  Though Kelley is the subject of three biographies and an autobiography, author Leigh Bienen, a senior lecturer at the School of Law, concluded during her extensive research on the legal and social activist that too little had been written about her efforts to improve working conditions in Chicago, where starving women and children labored long hours in unsafe conditions. 

 

In an interesting twist, Bienen parallels her own life in Chicago with Kelley’s in the new book. She braids together three narratives, the story of Kelley’s life as a mother and reformer in the tumult of 1890s Chicago, the story of her (Bienen’s) own arrival in Chicago a century later and her life and work here, as well as a narrative of the extraordinary events leading to the abolition of capital punishment in Illinois.

 

Tireless in her efforts to improve working conditions and eradicate child labor, Kelley was fleeing an abusive husband when she came to Chicago from New York in the 1890s and took up residence with her children at Hull-House, the legendary settlement house co-founded by Jane Addams. Although strapped for funds, Kelley did the work she set out to do, held several government jobs, and, along with others, persuaded the public that this was the time to do something about the conditions in the tenements. She was named the first chief factory inspector for the state of Illinois. Gov. Peter Altgeld’s 1893 appointment of a woman to such an important position was nearly unprecedented.    Kelley implemented a factory inspection law adopted by the Illinois legislature in 1893, limiting women’s working hours to eight per day.

 

The new book grew out of an interactive website based on Bienen’s research on Kelley that was launched in 2008 (http://florencekelley.northwestern.edu). “I am interested in her life, her family life, her children and how she managed to be both a public figure and a mother,” Bienen said.  “None of the biographies adequately deal with her decade in Chicago, perhaps because they were written by Easterners,” Bienen said. “None, in my opinion, conveyed the richness of the historical context of the effort to reform conditions in city sweatshops and tenements and the actions and personalities of public figures such as Florence Kelley and Jane Addams.”

 

Also of particular interest to Bienen, Kelley earned a law degree from Northwestern in 1895 -- during a time when college graduate education was highly uncommon for women. Kelley was also known for combining fiery stylized prose with well-researched findings in her advocacy and investigations. ***

 

Extensive litigation challenging Kelley’s work and the new factory inspection law resulted in the Illinois Supreme Court declaring parts of the law unconstitutional in 1895. However, Kelley and her colleagues triumphed years later when the U.S. Supreme Court, at the urging of Louis Brandeis, upheld such statutes. Kelley and her colleague Josephine Goldmark invented the Brandeis Brief for that case. 

September 20, 2014 in Books, Legal History | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, September 16, 2014

New Edition of Women and the Law

I have published the 2014 edition of Women and the Law (Thomas Reuters).  This annual edition collects selected top scholarship in women's legal rights from the past year. A sort of greatest hits of women and the law articles compiled for the researcher and practitioner to stay up on both current trends and the breadth of work in the field.

The Table of Contents:

Reproductive Rights 

Tracy A. Thomas, Back to the Future of Abortion Rights in the First Term, 29 Wis. J. Law, Gender & Soc’y 47 (2014)

Nicole Huberfeld, With Liberty and Access for Some: The ACA's Disconnect for Women's Health, XL Fordham Urban Law Journal 1357 (2013)

Elizabeth Sepper, Contraception and the Birth of Corporate Conscience, 22 American University Journal of Gender, Social Policy & the Law 303 (2014) 

Jamie R. Abrams, Distorted and Diminished Tort Claims for Women, 34 Cardozo Law Review 1955 (2013)

Feminism and the Family

Melissa L. Breger, The (In)Visibility of Motherhood in Family Court Proceedings, 36 N.Y.U. Rev. of Law & Social Change 555 (2012)

 Lauren Sudeall Lucas, A Dilemma of Doctrinal Design: Rights, Identity and the Work-Family Conflict, 8 FIU L. Rev. 379 (2013)

Sabrina Balgamwalla, Bride and Prejudice: How the U.S. Immigration Law Discriminates Against Spousal Visa Holders, 29 Berkeley Journal of Gender, Law & Justice 25 (2014)   

Violence Against Women

Carolyn B. Ramsey, The Exit Myth: Family Law, Gender Roles, and Changing Attitudes Toward Female Victims of Domestic Violence" 20 Michigan Journal of Gender & Law 1 (2013)

Jane K. Stoever, Transforming Domestic Violence Representation", 101 Kentucky Law Journal (2013)

Sarah Lynnda Swan, Triangulating Rape, 37 NYU Review of Law and Social Change 403 (2013)

Women in the Workplace

Joan C. Williams, Double Jeopardy? An Empirical Study with Implications for the Debates over Implicit Bias and Intersectionality, 37 Harv. J. Gender & Law 185 (2014)

Kimberly Yuracko, Soul of a Woman: The Sex Stereotyping Prohibition at Work, 161 U. Penn. L. Rev. 757 (2013)

Laura Rosenbury, Work Wives, 36 Harv. J. Law & Gender 345 (2013)

Kimberley D. Krawiec, John M. Conley, Lissa L. Broome, The Danger of Difference: Tensions in Directors’ Views of Corporate Board Diversity", 2013 University of Illinois Law Review 919 (2013)

Women as Economic Actors

Linda Coco, Visible Women: Locating Women in Financial Failure, Bankruptcy Law, and Bankruptcy Reform, 8 Charleston L. Rev. 191 (2013)

Amy Schmitz, Sex Matters: Considering Gender in Consumer Contracts, 19 Cardozo Journal of Law & Gender 437 (2013)

Feminist Legal Theory

 Wendy   W. Williams, Ruth   Bader Ginsburg's Equal Protection Clause: 1970-80, 25 Columbia Journal   of Gender and Law 41 (2013)

 Jill Elaine Hasday, Women's Exclusion from the Constitutional Canon, 2013 University of Illinois Law Review 1715 (2013)

 Rebecca Zietlow, Rights of Belonging for Women, 1 Indiana Journal of Law & Social Equality 64-99 (2013)

 Aya Gruber, Neofeminism, 50 Houston L. Rev. 1325 (2013)

 

 

 

 

September 16, 2014 in Books, Gender, Women lawyers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, September 6, 2014

Book Review: Feminism Unfinished

From WaPo, Feminism Unfinished

“Feminism Unfinished"... argues that the “wave” metaphor obscures the history of a continuous American women’s movement sustained by labor activists, civil rights advocates and social-reform campaigners, who may have looked placid on the surface but were paddling like hell underneath. Each of the three authors contributes a chapter to their history of American feminism, and they declare together in their prologue that “there was no period in the last century in which women were not campaigning for greater equality and freedom.” They hope that uncovering the “multiple and unfinished feminisms of the twentieth century can inspire” the women’s movements of the 21st. That’s the surprise signaled in the teasing subtitle.

September 6, 2014 in Books, Legal History, Theory | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, August 9, 2014

Books: Bad Feminist

From Slate, It is Good to be a "Bad" Feminist

I bristled a little at the title of Roxane Gay’s new collection of essays: Bad Feminist. Was that “bad” a backhanded boast, a Cool Girl’s rejection of all the supposedly militant and humorless “good” feminists out there?

 

Then I started reading the book, and I realized the professor cum novelist cum voice-on-the-Internet isn’t proclaiming herself a chiller, smarter, funnier feminist than anyone else. She is exploring imperfection: the power we (we people, and especially we women) wield in spite and because of it. Her essays, which are arresting and sensitive but rarely conclusive, don’t care much for unbroken skin. They are about flaws, sometimes scratches and sometimes deep wounds. Gay studies the cracks and what fills them.

August 9, 2014 in Books, Theory | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, August 7, 2014

Defining the Good Lawyer

In preparation for teaching a fall intersession class of ADR, I read the new book, Doug Linder & Nancy Levit's (UMKC) The Good Lawyer.  Their defining characteristics of a good lawyer according to Linder and Levit are:

  • Empathy (care about your client's case; put yourself in the client's shoes; active listening)
  • Courage 
  • Willpower (for the long-haul of litigation; stay healthy; reduce anxiety)
  • Value the legal community (civility)
  • Both Intuitive and Deliberative Thinking
  • Realistic about the Future (avoid overconfidence; use decision trees)
  • Serve the True Interests of the client (you are a counselor, not a hired gun)
  • Integrity (pro bono, honesty, big picture justice)
  • Persuasive (empathy, honesty, prepared)
  • Maintain Quality in Changing Environment (no dishonest billing; work/life balance)

It was noted that women lawyers exhibit more empathy and better avoid the overconfidence problem.

Here's a review from WSJ.

August 7, 2014 in Books, Women lawyers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, July 31, 2014

Book Review: Justice Sotomayor's Beloved World

 

Rebecca Lee (Thomas Jefferson), has posted Book Review, Sonia Sotomayor: Role Model of Empathy and Purposeful Ambition, Minnesota Law Rev. Headnotes (2013).

In writing her memoir, My Beloved World, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor expressly acknowledges that she is a public role model and embraces this responsibility by making herself accessible to a broad audience. As a public figure, she sees an opportunity to connect with others through an account of her life journey, with details of initial challenges and lessons learned along the way, to show that one’s beginnings need not constrain one’s aspirations. Although her memoir ends at the point she begins her judicial career, twenty years ago, her experiences and reflections provide a sense of how she may approach her work on the Supreme Court, including the importance she attaches to perspective-taking — or empathy — in relating to others and viewing the larger world. Her empathic skill, as well as her understanding of public purpose as a Justice and role model, all serve to strengthen the judicial function and present a hopeful picture of further important contributions to come as she continues her work on the bench.

July 31, 2014 in Books, Women lawyers | Permalink | Comments (0)