Thursday, May 8, 2014

Teaching Women's Legal History

I just published the book chapter, Teaching Women's Legal History in Teaching Legal History: Comparative Perspectives (Robert Jarvis, ed. 2014).  Here's an excerpt:

My objectives for the class focus on women, historical relevance, and feminist methodology.  First, the class is designed to explore the historical development of women’s rights in the law, information that is mostly absent in other courses except for a scattered representation in constitutional law.  Second, my goal is to foster an appreciation for the modern significance of that history.  This “applied legal history” approach seeks a useable past that enables history to be relevant to ongoing legal disputes of gender.  Finally, the course introduces and utilizes feminist methodology of deconstruction and integration.  It trains the students to read the law with suspicion by looking beyond the seeming objectivity of the law to expose assumptions and biases.  It also then adds to that law and context the omitted experiences of women. There is value in expanding feminist methodology beyond the usual feminist theory class because it offers a critical way of approaching the law, emphasizes social context, and teaches gender as a core value.    

 

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/gender_law/2014/05/teaching-womens-legal-history.html

Education, Law schools, Legal History | Permalink

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