Thursday, August 28, 2014

More Protection for Pregnant Women in Illinois

The story from The Nation:

Once upon a time, when a working woman became pregnant, she’d typically be expected to leave her job and retreat into full-time domestic duties. These days, white-collar career women sport proud baby bumps under power suits, and across the workforce, women now regularly serve as the main breadwinners, and must work before, during, and after pregnancy. Yet many workplaces are still stuck in a Victorian mindset about what pregnant women can and can’t do on the job. Now a new law in Illinois is set to modernize the way bosses deal with pregnant employees.

And: 

The so-called Pregnancy Fairness law, which Governor Pat Quinn signed into law yesterday, establishes distinct civil rights protections for pregnant workers who require a modest adjustment to their duties to do their jobs. The employer still has the right to refuse but only if it could prove that the accommodation “would impose an undue hardship” on the business.

 

August 28, 2014 in Reproductive Rights | Permalink | Comments (0)

"4 Interesting Facts about Louisiana's Abortion Law"

From NOLA.COM:

Officials with three Louisiana abortion clinics head into a Baton Rouge federal court Thursday morning seeking to delay new state abortion restrictions slated to go into affect Sept. 1.

The new restrictions could shut down most -- if not all -- of Louisiana's abortion clinics next week due to an absence of physicians legally able to provide abortions.

And: 

Under the new state law, signed by Gov. Bobby Jindal in June, physicians who perform abortions must have permission to admit patients at a local hospital within 30 miles of the abortion clinic where they work. Abortion clinic officials said their doctors are still waiting to hear back from local hospitals about whether they will be granted admitting privileges, which is why the law should be put on hold for now. 

There's more--including the 4 interesting facts in NOLA.COM.  

August 28, 2014 in Reproductive Rights | Permalink | Comments (0)

Lifting the Statute of Limitations for Rape

Wendy Davis Proposes Lifting the Statute of Limitations for Rape

State Sen. Wendy Davis, the Democratic candidate for Texas governor who rose to national fame last year by spearheading a fight against a draconian abortion bill,held a press conference Wednesday to highlight her ideas on how to fight sexual assault. Talking about her legislative efforts to process the estimated backlog of 16,000 untested rape kits in the state, Davis said she wanted to take the solution a step further. She proposed lifting the statute of limitations for sexual assault entirely, in no small part to make sure that rapists don't escape justice just because a rape kit lingered untested for so long that the window for prosecution closed. 

August 28, 2014 in Violence Against Women | Permalink | Comments (0)

Cheryl Hanna's Words on Recommitting to the Law

As we begin this new academic year, a reminder of the power and beauty of the law from a past address of Professor Cheryl Hanna. (Re)Committing to a Life of the Law

But more importantly, I don’t just love the law, I love lawyers. I have the greatest admiration and respect for what you do. Now, that is not to say that we don’t have problems in the profession . . . . But it is my humble opinion the law and those who practice it are among the most important people in our democracy.

 

But I have been very disturbed lately by what I see as unjustified attacks on the profession. . . .

 

To that end, Todd asked me to give an inspirational talk. I am not sure that I can do that, but as a professor, I can give you homework. In the medical field, there is something that is called the model of the reflective practitioner. The premise is simple: professionals who intentionally reflect upon what they do and why they do it learn in more profound ways and express greater satisfaction with their profession. Doctors are being trained to actively engage in professional reflection as part of their medical education. However, law schools have not done a good job of implementing similar training for lawyers, and thus, lawyers often don’t have the tools or guidance to become a reflective practitioner, and, as a result I think, often experience greater ambivalence about the legal profession and their role in it.

 

So, I’d like to introduce some concept about intentional reflection to you and give you some tools to use to try to become a reflective practitioner with the hope that you will do yourselves justice and find more meaning in your professional lives.

[h/t Jackie Gardina]

 

 

August 28, 2014 in Education, Law schools | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, August 26, 2014

You can't register for classes at Ohio University until....

.....you--a college student--complete an education program intended to prevent sexual assault.  The story: 

Bill Arnold, graduate assistant for bystander intervention and prevention education with the OU Survivor Advocacy Program (OUSAP), said Thursday the Not Anymore program is akin to the mandatory Alcohol EDU course all freshmen must take. The online course takes about two hours to complete, and features video lessons on topics including consent, alcohol, sexual assault, bystander intervention and rape culture.

And: 

Arnold said the mandatory program is a required part of the Violence Against Women Act's grant funding for the OU Women's Center, which supports OUSAP. He said the average cost per student to the university for the Not Anymore program, depending on final enrollment totals at OU, is around $3 to $4.

August 26, 2014 in Violence Against Women | Permalink | Comments (0)

Catholic Website Condemns Transgenderism

From the Catholic Online

In a culture where freedom has been redefined as a right to choose anything and liberty has degenerated into license, the newspeak of the age has declared the instrumental use of the body of another to be sexual freedom. It is not freedom. It turns people into objects of use and degrades the dignity of human sexuality. 

And: 

Sadly, the same spirit of the age fails to recognize the integral unity of the human person, body, soul and spirit, and has turned the human body into a machine with parts which the revolutionaries think can simply be interchanged.  Removal of genitals and attachment of artificially constructed ones which are absolutely incapable of ovulation or conception, does not change the structure of reality. The removal constitutes mutilation and the construction of artificial organs with no reproductive function does not alter the gender or sex of the person.

August 26, 2014 in LGBT, Religion | Permalink | Comments (0)

Akron Program on the Social and Legal Implications of Same Sex Families Featuring Stephanie Coontz

Program Schedule: The Social and Legal Implications of Same Sex Families

Families and Communities Interdisciplinary Seminar
The Social and Legal Implications of Same Sex Relationships
September 11, 2014 – 7 hours CLE and CEU

8:00 a.m.

Registration & Continental Breakfast
Sponsored by The University of Akron School of Law, Law Association for Women

8:25 a.m. Introductory Remarks – Gary Rosen, Partner, Goldman & Rosen
8:30 a.m.

How Did We Get Here? Historical Context and Contemporary Implications of the Spread of Same-Sex Marriage
Featured Speaker: 
Stephanie Coontz, Author; Director of Research and Public Education for the Council on Contemporary Families; Professor at The Evergreen State College, Washington

9:30 a.m.

State of the Law Today
Presenter:
Marc SpindelmanIsadore and Ida Topper Professor of Law, The Ohio State University Moritz College of Law

10:30 a.m. Break – Sponsored by Akron Family Institute
10:45 a.m.

Religious & Social Issues
Presenters:  
Gizelle Jones, Executive Director, Jewish Family Services
Rabbi Emeritus David M. Horowitz, DD, Temple Israel; PFLAG, National Board and past president, Akron Chapter
Dr. Joe Coffey, Lead Pastor, Christ Community Chapel

11:30 a.m.

Lunch – Sponsored by Summit County Probate Court
Structured Discussion Activity

12:30 p.m.

Case Study
Nancy Reeves, Assistant Director, Academic Success Program
The University of Akron School of Law

12:45 p.m.

Probate Issues
Presenters:  
Jennifer L. Branch, Equire, Partner, Gerhardstein & Branch Co. LPA, Cincinnati  
The Honorable Elinor Marsh Stormer, Judge, Summit County Probate Court
Emily M. Hete, Esquire

1:30 p.m.

Domestic Relations – Divorce, Parentage, Domestic Violence 
Presenters:  
The Honorable John P. Quinn, Judge, Domestic Relations Court of Summit County 
Thomas J. Addesa, Esquire Artz Dewhirst & Wheeler, Columbus

2:15 p.m. Break – Sponsored by CANAPI
2:30 p.m.

Juvenile Issues: A Child’s Perspective
Presenters:
The Honorable Linda Tucci Teodosio, Judge Summit County Juvenile Court
Dr. Erich Merkle, School Psychologist and Student Support Services & Security, Akron Public Schools
Julie Barnes, Executive Director
Summit County Children Services Board

3:15 p.m. Q&A – Written questions collected from audience
3:45 p.m.

Closing Panel – Where do we go from here?
Presenter:
Stephanie Coontz and other speakers

4:15 p.m. Adjournment 

This course has been approved by the Supreme Court of Ohio Commission on Continuing Legal Education for 7.00 total CLE hours instruction.

 

REGISTER HERE.

August 26, 2014 in Conferences | Permalink | Comments (0)

Is Alimony Anti-Feminist?

Is Alimony Anti-Feminist?

The concept of alimony, also referred to as “maintenance” in some countries, dates back thousands of years and was first referenced in texts in ancient Babylon. Though gender roles and traditional marriage definitions have evolved greatly since then, the traditional meaning of alimony has remained largely the same. A marriage ends and one party pays the less financially solvent party some sort of means of support. In ancient times when it was not feasible for women to obtain meaningful work or to remarry easily due to cultural norms, alimony served as an important form of security. But today, in an age in which women serve in the cabinet and are now obtaining college degrees at higher rates than men, the idea that women (who receive alimony at much higher rates than men) should be awarded a post-divorce allowance from a spouse strikes many as outdated and an embarrassment to feminist principles.

August 26, 2014 in Family | Permalink | Comments (0)

Faculty Thoughts and Thoughts on Faculty as we go Back to School

As we start back to school, lots of thinking about what faculty do.

August 26, 2014 in Education, Law schools | Permalink | Comments (0)

Feminist Goes Mainstream

Monday, August 25, 2014

CFP Feminist Legal Theory at Law & Society 2015

Call for Papers

Friday September 19th Deadline

Feminist Legal Theory Collaborative Research Network
at the Law and Society Association Annual Meeting
Seattle, May 28 - 31, 2015

Dear friends and colleagues,

We write to invite you to participate in panels sponsored by the Feminist Legal Theory Collaborative Research Network at the Law and Society Annual Meeting in 2015.

Information about the Law and Society meeting (including registration and hotel information) is at: http://www.lawandsociety.org/Seattle2015/seattle2015.html 

Within Law & Society, the Feminist Legal Theory CRN seeks to bring together scholars across a range of fields who are interested in feminist legal theory. There is no pre-set theme to which papers must conform. We would be especially happy to see proposals that fit in with the LSA conference theme, which is the role of law and legal institutions in sustaining, creating, interrogating, and ameliorating inequalities. We welcome proposals that would permit us to collaborate with other CRNs, such as the Critical Research on Race and the Law CRN or the Gender, Sexuality and the Law CRN. Also, because the LSA meeting attracts scholars from other disciplines, we welcome multidisciplinary proposals.

Our goal is to stimulate focused discussion of papers on which scholars are currently working. Thus, while proposals may reference work that is well on the way to publication, we are particularly eager to solicit proposals for works-in-progress that are at an earlier stage and will benefit from the discussion that the panels will provide.

Our panels will use the LSA format, which requires four papers, but we will continue our custom of assigning a commentator for each individual paper. A committee of the CRN will assign individual papers to panels based on subject and will ask CRN members to volunteer to serve as chairs of each panel. The chair will develop a 100-250 word description for the session and submit the session proposal to LSA before their upcoming deadline on October 15, so that each panelist can submit his or her proposal, using the panel number assigned. Chairs will also be responsible for recruiting commentators but may wait to do so until panels have been scheduled later this winter.

If you would like to present a paper as part of a CRN panel, please submit a 400-500 word abstract, with your name and a title, on the Feminist Legal Theory CRN TWEN page (details provided below). If you would like to serve as a chair or a commentator for one of our panels, or if you are already planning a LSA session with four panelists (and papers) that you would like to see included in the Feminist Legal Theory CRN, please let Cynthia Godsoe know (cynthia.godsoe@brooklaw.edu).

In addition to these panels, we may try to use some of the other formats that the LSA provides: the “author meets readers” format, salon, or the roundtable discussion. If you have an idea that you think would work well in one of these formats, please
let us know.

TWEN is an online resource administered by Westlaw. If you have access to Westlaw but haven’t yet registered for the TWEN page, signing up is easy: Sign onto Westlaw, hit the tab on the top for “TWEN,” then click “Add Course,” and choose the “FLT CRN 2014” from the drop-down list of National TWEN Courses. Once you arrive at the Feminist Legal Theory CRN TWEN page, look to the left hand margin and click on “Law & Society 2015 – Abstracts.” If you do not have a Westlaw password, please email Aziza Ahmed at Az.Ahmed@neu.edu and ask to be enrolled directly.

Please submit all proposals for paper presentations by Friday, September 19. This will permit us to organize panels and submit them prior to the LSA’s deadline on October 15. If we cannot accept all proposals for the CRN, we will notify you by early October so that you can submit an independent proposal to LSA.

We hope you’ll join us in Seattle to discuss the scholarship in which we are all engaged and connect with others doing work on feminism and gender.

Best,
LSA Planning Committee

Aziza Ahmed
Cynthia Godsoe
Leslie Harris
Courtney Joslin
Ummni Khan
Dara Purvis
Julie Shapiro

August 25, 2014 in Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

CFP: Applied Feminism and Work

CALL FOR PAPERS: "APPLIED FEMINISM AND WORK"

 

The University of Baltimore School of Law’s Center on Applied Feminism seeks submissions for its Eighth Annual Feminist Legal Theory Conference.  This year’s theme is “Applied Feminism and Work.”  The conference will be held on March 5 and 6, 2015.  For more information about the conference, please visit law.ubalt.edu/caf.

 

As the nation emerges from the recession, work and economic security are front and center in our national policy debates.  Women earn less than men, and the new economic landscape impacts men and women differently.  At the same time, women are questioning whether to Lean In or Lean Out, and what it means to “have it all.”  The conference will build on these discussions. As always, the Center’s conference will serve as a forum for scholars, practitioners and activists to share ideas about applied feminism, focusing on the intersection of theory and practice to effectuate social change.  The conference seeks papers that discuss this year’s theme through the lens of an intersectional approach to feminist legal theory, addressing not only the premise of seeking justice for all people on behalf of their gender but also the interlinked systems of oppression based on race, sexual orientation, gender identity, class, immigration status, disability, and geographical and historical context.

 

Papers might explore the following questions:  What impact has feminist legal theory had on the workplace? How does work impact gender and vice versa?  How might feminist legal theory respond to issues such as stalled immigration reform, economic inequality, pregnancy accommodation, the low-wage workforce, women’s access to economic opportunities, family-friendly work environments, paid sick and family leave, decline in unionization, and low minimum wage rates?  What sort of support should society and law provide to ensure equal employment opportunities that provide for security for all?  How do law and feminist legal theory conceptualize the role of the state and the private sector in relation to work?  Are there rights to employment and what are their foundations?  How will the recent Supreme Court Burwell v. Hobby Lobby and Harris v. Quinn decisions impact economic opportunities for women?  How will the new EEOC guidance on pregnancy accommodation and the Young v. UPS upcoming Supreme Court decision affect rights of female workers? 

 

The conference will provide an opportunity for participants and audience members to exchange ideas about the current state of feminist legal theories.  We hope to deepen our understandings of how feminist legal theory relates to work and to move new insights into practice.  In addition, the conference is designed to provide presenters with the opportunity to gain feedback on their papers. 

 

The conference will begin the afternoon of Thursday, March 5, 2015, with a workshop.   This workshop will continue the annual tradition of involving all attendees as participants in an interactive discussion and reflection.   On Friday, March 6, 2015, the conference will continue with a day of presentations regarding current scholarship and/or legal work that explores the application of feminist legal theory to issues involving health.   The conference will be open to the public and will feature a keynote speaker. Past keynote speakers have included Nobel Laureate Toni Morrison, Dr. Maya Angelou, Gloria Steinem, Pulitzer Prize winning journalist Sheryl WuDunn, Senators Barbara Mikulski and Amy Klobuchar, and NOW President Terry O’Neill.

 

To submit a paper proposal, please submit an abstract by Friday, 5 p.m. on October 31, 2014, to ubfeministconference@gmail.com.  It is essential that your abstract contain your full contact information, including an email, phone number, and mailing address where you can be reached.  In the “Re” line, please state:  CAF Conference 2015.  Abstracts should be no longer than one page.  We will notify presenters of selected papers in mid-November.  We anticipate being able to have twelve paper presenters during the conference on Friday, March 6, 2015. About half the presenter slots will be reserved for authors who commit to publishing in the symposium volume of the University of Baltimore Law Review.  Thus, please indicate at the bottom of your abstract whether you are submitting (1) solely to present or (2) to present and publish in the symposium volume.  Authors who are interested in publishing in the Law Review will be strongly considered for publication.  Regardless of whether or not you are publishing in the symposium volume, all working drafts of symposium-length or article-length papers will be due no later than February 13, 2015.   Abstracts will be posted on the Center on Applied Feminism’s conference website to be shared with other participants and attendees.   Presenters are responsible for their own travel costs; the conference will provide a discounted hotel rate, as well as meals. 

 

We look forward to your submissions.  If you have further questions, please contact Prof. Margaret Johnson at majohnson@ubalt.edu.

 

 

August 25, 2014 in Call for Papers, Work/life | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, August 24, 2014

33 states don't protect LGBT youth from bullying

According to Vox: 

Anti-bullying_lgbt_laws

August 24, 2014 in LGBT | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, August 23, 2014

Justice Breyer "The Fourth Feminist"?

Dahlia Lithwick, Justice Stephen Breyer: Feminist

Amid all the gender talk, then, it’s been no surprise that, as Lyle Denniston noted last month, the headlines across the boards this summer have trumpeted the notion that the women were applying a special kind of women’s justice at the highest court in the land, and that their gender is influencing their votes, whether or not you agree with the legal outcomes. And that’s why it’s worth offering up a brief shout out to the unsung feminist at the court, Justice Stephen Breyer, who has consistently voted alongside the court’s three women on virtually all gender issues and nobody has yet made a Tumblr for him.

August 23, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Why 911 Technology is Important for Domestic Violence Protection

Ms., When 9-1-1 Can't Find You: How Wireless Providers Can Save Women's Lives

Last month, Michelle Miers was shot and stabbed at her home by an attacker. Still breathing but in need of urgent medical care, she picked up her cellphone and dialed 9-1-1. Like most Americans, Miers probably presumed that calling 9-1-1 guaranteed help was on the way. For the 26-year-old mother of two, however, help would come too late—not because Miers was too far away, or because her wounds were already too severe, but because police and paramedics couldn’t figure out where she was.

 

Miers is one of more than an estimated 10,000 Americans who will die this year because wireless companies don’t transmit precise enough location data to 9-1-1 operators, leaving police unable to locate victims. In Miers’ case, responders were left scrambling door-to-door for 20 minutes before they spotted the apartment building with broken glass in the entryway where Miers lay covered in blood.

August 23, 2014 in Technology, Violence Against Women | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, August 21, 2014

Hook Up Culture Wanes at Harvard, Stanford

From Bloomberg

As former social chair of the Sigma Chi fraternity at Harvard University, Malik Gill wants to appear especially welcoming to girls who come to the house for parties.

Yet, Gill, who starts his junior year in a few weeks, says he won’t be offering a female classmate a beer.

Why not? 

“I don’t want to look like a predator,” the 20-year-old economics major said. “It’s a little bit of a blurred line.”

August 21, 2014 in Masculinities, Violence Against Women | Permalink | Comments (0)

$3200 for a Bride

vietnambride

 

Chinese men in rural villages are paying $3200 to families (parents, usually) to sell their daughters in rural Vietnam for marriage. 

Their marriages were arranged for cash, but some of the Vietnamese women who have found unlikely Prince Charmings in remote Chinese villages say they are living happily ever after.

 "Economically, life is better here in China," said Nguyen Thi Hang, one of around two dozen women from Vietnam who have married men in Linqi.

On the other hand, some women, finding themselves in terrible marriages, have a tough time leaving.  

August 21, 2014 in Family, Human trafficking, International | Permalink | Comments (0)

Study Finds Drop in Women's Representation in the Legal Profession

Jason Nance (Florida) and Paul Madsen (Florida), An Empirical Analysis of Diversity in the Legal Profession, Connecticut L. Rev. (forthcoming).

In contrast to prior studies, we find that, although woefully underrepresented as a whole in the legal profession, the representation of young African Americans and Hispanic Americans in the legal profession is comparable to the representation of these groups in other prestigious professions. This finding suggests that the underrepresentation of African Americans and Hispanic Americans in the legal profession may be caused primarily by social forces external to the legal profession, and that, in addition to continuing its current diversity efforts, the legal profession should put a concentrated emphasis on initiatives that assist these underrepresented groups to become eligible to pursue all types of prestigious employment opportunities that have significant barriers to entry. Further, we find that Asian Americans, in contrast to other minorities, are very poorly represented in the legal profession as compared to other prestigious professions. Finally, there is some evidence suggesting that women are relatively well represented in the legal profession when compared to other prestigious professions until recently, when they appear to have become slightly underrepresented. This recent drop may be caused by the failure of the legal profession to provide just and inclusive workplaces, leading to greater dissatisfaction and higher attrition rates among female associates.

 

August 21, 2014 in Women lawyers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Women Judges Can't Decide Sports Cases

Local Mom Decides Important Sports Case.  Sportcasters have discounted federal judge Claudia Wilken who decided O'Bannon v. NCAA, the landmark case that challenged the NCAA’s longstanding treatment of its college athletes, by describing her as "local PTA mom."   Its not her Stanford or Berkeley education nor decades of legal and judicial experience that informed her decision, but her motherly work on the PTA.

[NYT Sportswriter] writes that her “decision [in O’Bannon] may be interpreted much the way her advice at school meetings often was: Let’s work it out, through dialogue and compromise.” If decades of legal experience can’t explain what made Wilken capable of presiding over the O'Bannon case, perhaps her stint in the PTA will.

August 21, 2014 in Sports | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Did a 1972 Supreme Court Already Decide Right to Gay Marriage?

From WaPo

A whole lot of judges who are being asked to decide whether states may ban same-sex couples from marrying think the Supreme Court clearly gave them the answer last year: no.

But a few judges think the Supreme Court provided the answer more than 40 years ago: yes.

More: 

That reading comes from a one-sentence order the court issued in a 1972 case, Baker v. Nelson, which said there was no “substantial federal question” in a state’s decision to ban same-sex marriages.

The dismissal of that long-ago case might be the reason that same-sex marriage supporters see their winning streak in federal courts come to an end.

August 19, 2014 in LGBT | Permalink | Comments (0)