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September 4, 2009

Can they do this? Beer from Civet (weasel-like animal) droppings

Asian Parlm civet Bevlog beer and wine label blog comes up with the oddest things.  But this one really has me wondering.  Here's the blurb:

Beer with Civet Droppings

Mikkeller Beer Geek Brunch. . . is made with weasel excrement. Literally. The label explains that:

This imperial Oatmeal stout is brewed with one of the world’s most expensive coffees, made from droppings of weasel-like civet cats. The fussy Southeast Asian animals only eat the best and ripest coffee berries. Enzymes in their digestive system help to break down the bean. Workers collect the bean-containing droppings for Civet or Weasel Coffee. The exceedingly rare Civet Coffee has a strong, distinctive taste and an even stronger aroma.

So here are my questions.  Does this qualify as "beer" for IRS purposes? (See post here.)  Are coffee beans culled out of Civet droppings GRAS? Who regulates this stuff? Is this one of those alcohol-caffeine drinks (blogged here) some were concerned about?

Here's what Wikipedia says about "Civet Coffee"

Kopi Luak (pronounced [ˈkopi ˈloo - uck]) or Civet coffee is coffee made from coffee berries which have been eaten by and passed through the digestive tract of the Asian Palm Civet (Paradoxurus hermaphroditus) and other related civets. The civets eat the berries, but the beans inside pass through their system undigested.

The photo is from Wikipedia.  License info here.

September 4, 2009 in Ingredients | Permalink

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Comments

I couldn't imagine coffee beens extracted from excrement are GRAS, but who knows?

It's worth noting though, the roasting temperatures, and the coffee brewing temperatures, and (possibly) the beer pasteurization are all done subsequently and may make the process more.. um? palatable? to those concerned about this.

Posted by: butwait | Sep 23, 2009 8:13:32 AM

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