Family Law Prof Blog

Editor: Margaret Ryznare
Indiana University
Robert H. McKinney School of Law

Monday, May 2, 2016

The State of Facebook and Family Law

From California Lawyer:

Facebook is ubiquitous now, right? What “You’ve Got Mail!” was to the 90s, “Like” buttons and status updates are to today’s Internet users. And while I was one of the first college students to use Facebook, and I watched it grow from a college kids’ message board to the social network, I knew it had really gone mainstream when a barely literate relative who has trouble operating a flip-phone “liked” one of my photos. If he can figure it out, all lawyers need to be able to do so as well, because Facebook’s ubiquity means it is a primary form of communication—on par with email and postal mail.

Not sold yet? What if I told you that a court had allowed service of process in a divorce case through Facebook? Or that two people recently found themselves in contempt of court for Facebooking a protected party? What if I told you a bunch of cool stories about opposing parties ruining their cases by broadcasting the finer details of their lifestyle to their online friends?

Maybe then you’d add a Facebook warning for your clients, and regular Facebook checks for opposing clients, to your typical case preparation strategy. If not, perhaps an ethics rule requiring familiarity with social media would be enough to get you on the bandwagon—Facebook isn’t new, but an ethical duty to know how to use it certainly would be.

This is a general roundup of the state of Facebook and family law: from cases on the frontier, to stalking opposing clients, to a wave of new ethics rules regarding proficiency with technology.

Read more here.

 

 

May 2, 2016 in Web/Tech | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, September 28, 2015

New Website Promises to Handle Your Divorce and Filing Costs for $99

From TIME:

A new website aims to take much of the heartache and cost out of getting a divorce by conducting the whole process online.

Presented at TechCrunch Disrupt in San Francisco on Tuesday, Separate.us, founded by Sandro Tuzzo and Larry Maloney, aims to distill legal jargon into plain language and reduce legal fees from tens of thousands of dollars to base price of around $1,500. Initial filing costs just $99.

“Today, connecting is easy. There’s tons of software applications out there for that,” Tuzzo said onstage at the event. “But what if you need to end a relationship, where are the tools for that?”

After working as a divorce attorney for the past 15 years, Tuzzo said he knows too well just how arduous the process can be. Separate.us aims to simplify the procedure by letting users complete, file and serve divorce papers online.

Read more here.

September 28, 2015 in Divorce (grounds), International, Web/Tech | Permalink | Comments (0)