Family Law Prof Blog

Editor: Margaret Ryznare
Indiana University
Robert H. McKinney School of Law

Wednesday, July 20, 2016

Programme aims to help people affected by 'parental alienation'

From The Guardian:

Parental alienation – a phenomenon where one parent poisons their child against the other parent – has become such a feature of the most difficult family breakdowns that Cafcass, the Children and Family Court Advisory and Support Service, is to offer targeted support for those affected following a government-funded intensive therapeutic pilot programme.

Distinct from the all-too-common acrimony between divorcing parents, the syndrome is an internationally recognised phenomenon. In America and Canada, “parenting coordinators” are ordered and supervised by the courts to help restore relationships between parents and children identified as “alienated”. In Mexico and Brazil, alienating a child from a parent is a criminal act.

Psychiatrist Richard Gardner developed the concept 20 years ago, defining it as “a disorder that arises primarily in the context of child custody disputes. Its primary manifestation is the child’s campaign of denigration against a parent, a campaign that has no justification. It results from the combination of a programming (brainwashing) parent’s indoctrinations and the child’s own contributions to the vilification of the target parent.”

Read more here.

July 20, 2016 in Custody (parenting plans), Divorce (grounds), Resources - Child Custody, Resources - Child Support, Resources - Children & the Law, Resources - Divorce, Visitation | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, July 4, 2016

Legal technicians provide family law assistance

From the News Tribune:

VNavigating the family law system can be an overwhelming and emotional process, especially for people who have no choice but to represent themselves in court.

The number of pro se litigants has steadily increased across the country, with between 60 to 90 percent of family law cases involving at least one party with no legal representation, according to information released by the American Bar Association in 2013.

"People are kind of in a society of do-it-yourself. Some people may be able to afford an attorney, but others can't. We are seeing more and more people representing themselves," Clark County Chief Deputy Clerk Baine Wilson said.

Local and state agencies recognize a strong need for assistance and have begun offering alternatives to help guide the public through the process, reported The Columbian.

Read more here.

July 4, 2016 in Attorneys, Resources - Adoption, Resources - Bar Associations, Resources - Child Custody, Resources - Child Support, Resources - Children & the Law, Resources - Civil Rights & Family Rights, Resources - Divorce, Resources - Domestic Violence, Resources - Research | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, December 15, 2015

What Impact Will A Child Custody Expert Have On A Case?

From LEXOLOGY:

In some child custody cases, a child custody expert (CCE) makes a recommendation to the court on what they believe the court’s final determination should be. The recommendations can range from custody and visitation to therapy recommendations. These recommendations are made after the CCE conducts interviews with the parents, the minor child, and any other interested parties in the case. It is important for a child who is meeting with a CCE to be as open as possible with the CCE. The CCE’s final written recommendation to the court is made in the child’s best interest.

A CCE’s purpose in conducting these interviews is to understand as much about the family dynamics as possible. Information gathered by a CCE from the parents, the child, and other parties during interviews is not confidential. Both parties can use the information acquired by the CCE. Additionally, the CCE is subject to examination and cross-examination during a trial.

It is natural for parents to be nervous when meeting with a CCE. It is in the best interest of the child for parents to present the facts of the case truthfully.

Read more here.

December 15, 2015 in Resources - Child Custody | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, March 22, 2013

Call for Papers

ISFL REGIONAL CONFERENCE IN ISRAEL, DECEMBER 29TH – 31ST, 2013

 Theme: International Family Law with Emphasis on the Work of the Hague Conference on Private International Law.

The conference marks the 30th anniversary of the entry into force of the Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction (in December 1983) and the publication of Dr. Rhona Schuz's book, "The Hague Child Abduction Convention – A Critical Analysis" (to be published in summer 2013 by Hart Publishing).

Download Conference flyer for further details.

MR

March 22, 2013 in Resources - Child Custody, Scholarship, Family Law | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

Sunday, October 11, 2009

Child Custody Resources