Family Law Prof Blog

Editor: Margaret Ryznare
Indiana University
Robert H. McKinney School of Law

Sunday, July 23, 2017

Divorce Finance

From Forbes:

Divorce is never easy. It represents the end of a way of life you have known for years. Not only could a divorce wear you out emotionally, it could wear you out financially. Even the wealthiest may not have sufficient access to capital during a divorce. Assets could be frozen during the pendency of a divorce. Some turn to friends or family for capital but, for some, this is not an option and certainly it is not an easy ask.

Read more here.

July 23, 2017 in Divorce (grounds) | Permalink | Comments (1)

Tuesday, June 13, 2017

Divorce and the Hong Kong Housing Market

From Bloomberg:

The usual suspects for Hong Kong’s sky-high property prices are low interest rates, a housing shortage and demand from mainland China. But there’s another unforeseen factor: divorce.

Demand for separations and remarriages have accelerated sharply over the past two decades as the former British colony has deepened its integration with the mainland. That’s according to Richard Wong, an academic at the University of Hong Kong and a veteran analyst of the local housing sector.

The numbers tell the story: Between 1976 and 1995, cumulative total marriages reached 803,072, with 84,788 divorces and 65,794 remarriages, according to Wong. In the subsequent years, through 2015, marriages rose to 878,552 while divorces shot up to 323,298 and remarriages came in at 256,066.

Looser travel restrictions between Hong Kong and the mainland after Britain handed the colony back in 1997 have played a role in encouraging Hong Kong residents to find new partners across the border. The divorce phenomenon is distinct from the mainland, where couples have sometimes separated simply to get around curbs on housing purchases.

Read more here.

June 13, 2017 in Divorce (grounds) | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, June 7, 2017

Do-It-Yourself Divorce in Ohio

From News 5 Cleveland:

CLEVELAND - After just four weeks in existence, the Cuyahoga County Domestic Relations Court Help Center has been flooded with more than 700 applicants hoping to represent themselves in their divorce cases.

The number of people choosing to represent themselves for financial or personal reasons has grown significantly in recent years.

In 2016, more than 60 percent of the cases filed in Domestic Relations Court were by applicants who did not have attorneys, an increase of over 10 percent from 2015.

But with the rise in pro se representation, has also come a rise in errors.

“Along the way, they make a lot of mistakes,” explained Judge Rosemary Grdina Gold of the Domestic Relations Division of the Cuyahoga County Common Pleas Court,  “And then they come to court to get a hearing and think they’re going to get divorced.”

But Judge Gold explained that these applicants often miss vital steps, delaying their divorces.

“I’ve had people break down at the bench crying,” Judge Gold said. “I need to get divorced today. I thought I was getting divorced.”

Read more here.

 

June 7, 2017 in Divorce (grounds) | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, May 30, 2017

Divorce & Shared Parenting

From Stat News:

As a young psychology intern in the late 1970s, my first patients were boys from divorced homes, suffering from what was then called “father hunger.” In those days, when parents split up, dads fell by the wayside. Fathers saw their children at the mothers’ discretion. This customary fallout from divorce reflected the belief that mothers are supremely important while fathers are expendable. We’ve come a long way since then.

Observing the problems that were being attributed to divorce, my colleagues and I began conducting studies in the late 1970s to learn how to help children cope better when their parents parted ways. The results of our research in Texas, supported by the National Institute for Mental Health, converged with studies in California, Virginia, and Arizona. The message from this work was clear: children and their fathers usually (though not always) wanted and needed more time together than they were getting. All signs pointed to the benefits for most families of having two parents involved in children’s lives who jointly maintained responsibility for their care. This is what is now called shared parenting.

Read more here.

May 30, 2017 in Divorce (grounds) | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, May 20, 2017

Rights in Same Sex Divorce

From USA Today:

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. — In the first ruling of its kind in Tennessee, a judge has granted a woman the legal rights of a husband.

The ruling, issued last week and made public Monday, came as the state Legislature was pushing through a bill designed to stop Judge Greg McMillan of Fourth Circuit Court — and any other judge in Tennessee — from making that very decision, court records show.

In a reversal from his decision last year, McMillan penned approval of a divorce for same-sex couple Sabrina Witt and Erica Witt that includes designation of Erica Witt as the father of the couple's daughter, conceived through artificial insemination.

Read more here.

May 20, 2017 in Divorce (grounds) | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, May 4, 2017

Louisiana Proposes Bill to Chop Divorce 'Cooling-Off' Period

From The Advocate:

Louisiana has sought for decades to stem the tide of the so-called divorce epidemic, from enacting the nation's first "covenant marriage" laws to requiring couples to undergo a lengthy "cooling-off" period before officially calling it quits.   

Even the most conservative lawmakers acknowledge that some marriages cannot — and perhaps should not — be saved. But they insist the state has a vested interest in limiting the prevalence of divorce, particularly when children are involved, given the host of societal ills associated with broken homes.

"Many people think it's not the government's business whether you're married or not," said Michelle Ghetti, a professor at the Southern University Law Center. "I would argue that, given the interest the government has in the economy, incarceration and education, it is most certainly the government's business, especially if we're paying taxes for it."

Read more here.

May 4, 2017 in Divorce (grounds) | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, April 22, 2017

Boycott Those Who Misuse Triple Talaq, Says All India Muslim Personal Law Board

From The Huffington Post:

Those using triple talaq recklessly and without justification should be made to face social boycott, the All India Muslim Personal Law Board (AIMPLB) said on Sunday at the conclusion of its executive meet here.

The body, which represents major sects, also came out with a code of conduct for divorce, in case the separation becomes inevitable. It notably does not recommend instant divorce or triple talaq as a way of separation.

"It has been decided in the executive meet that men who arbitrarily use triple talaq should face social boycott," AIMPLB member Kamal Farooqui told IANS.

Read more here

April 22, 2017 in Divorce (grounds) | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, April 20, 2017

What Ben Affleck and Jennifer Garner’s Unusual Divorce Filing Says About Their Split

From People:

Jennifer Garner and Ben Affleck continue to be a united front — even through their divorce.

The former couple officially filed divorce papers on Thursday — coordinating the filing of near-identical documents at the same time. In a somewhat unusual legal move, they both cited in pro persona, a legal term which means that, at least on the record, they are representing themselves and don’t cite a lawyer representing them.

That’s a way of keeping their case extra-private as well as signifying it’s amicable, says Peter M. Walzer, an L.A. certified family law specialist who’s not involved with their divorce.

“In most cases, because celebrities don’t want the public to see [the agreement], they agree privately and they file in pro per — which means they are representing themselves,” Walzer said. “All they’ll submit is a judgment of dissolution of marriage.” The couple can keep their more detailed divorce agreement — and any disputes — private.

Read more here

April 20, 2017 in Divorce (grounds) | Permalink | Comments (1)

Tuesday, March 7, 2017

Mississippi still won't make domestic abuse grounds for divorce

From The Huffington Post:

A bill that would have added domestic violence to the list of legal reasons a person can get a divorce in Mississippi died in a House committee on Tuesday after its chairman, state Rep. Andy Gipson (R), said it could open “the floodgates” to more divorces.

"If there’s a case of abuse, that person needs to have change of behavior and a serious change of heart,” he was quoted as saying. “Hopefully even in those cases restoration can happen.”

In a subsequent email to The Huffington Post, Gipson said his remarks were taken out of context, and that domestic violence victims who need a divorce are already covered under the existing grounds.

Read more here.

 
 

March 7, 2017 in Divorce (grounds) | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, February 28, 2017

What’s Mine Is Mine, What’s Yours Is Yours - Or Maybe Not

From The Huffington Post:

You are going to get married. You have substantial net worth. You have a business that you have built up over the years and it is now doing well. You are excited about your upcoming marriage and you don’t want to do anything that might take the excitement out of the process. Since you already own the business and you already have accumulated your worth, there seems to be nothing to worry about. After all, community property, as you understand it, encompasses that which you acquire during the course of your marriage. You already have the business and the assets going in, so in the off-chance it does not work out you will be okay financially.

While it is true that in California assets that are acquired prior to marriage, or that are acquired through a gift or inheritance are separate property - they don’t always remain so. If the business you are operating continues to grow through the marriage, the appreciation in the value of that business becomes community property. As a community property state, the law provides that accumulations made through the efforts of a spouse while married are community property. As a result, that growth that your business has experienced becomes community property as well. It does not mean that the entire business becomes community property, but some portion of it is jointly owned by you and your new spouse which means that if things do not work out - your new spouse is going to have his or her share of that business coming to them. This can create significant problems when it comes time to divide up the marital estate. It may be that most of your assets are tied up in that business and it may then become difficult to buy your new spouse out of it.

A similar problem can arise with separate property money. If it is passively invested, then in theory there is no issue — you put no effort into causing it to increase in value after marriage, and provided that you never put it into a jointly-titled account, or transferred it to an account opened after marriage it will be safe. The problem is that in real life things don’t usually work this way. Inevitably, some effort may go into managing it or at some point money will be moved from one account to another. And in the course of a marriage that lasts many years, things may come up that require the use of funds for a joint purpose that came from a separate property source and now require extensive accounting to trace back to that source.There is one way to avoid these problems.

There is one way to avoid these problems.

Read more here.

February 28, 2017 in Divorce (grounds) | Permalink | Comments (1)

Tuesday, February 21, 2017

Woman had to leave Mississippi to divorce husband

From 10 News: 

In 2001, Elizabeth Freels knew her marriage of seven years was over, and she wanted a divorce.

But her husband, David, felt otherwise. He didn't want one. Elizabeth said he told her, "I will not give you a divorce until the day you die. If I can't have you, no one else will."

And in Mississippi, one of only two states without a true "no-fault divorce" law, if one spouse doesn't want a divorce, he or she can often stave one off for a long time. In the Freels' case, it was more than a decade, according to a story in the Clarion-Ledger.

There's an effort in the Legislature to make some small reforms to Mississippi divorce law. But such efforts have failed in the past, and a measure to create a "no-fault" divorce based on length of separation has already been watered down early in the legislative process this session.

Read more here.

February 21, 2017 in Divorce (grounds) | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Texas fathers fight for equal custody law at legislature

From ABC 12 News:

A renewed effort is underway by fathers in this state to get a law passed allowing equal custody for both parents during a divorce.

"When you go through a divorce you split everything down the middle, why is it when you have a child you can split custody and time with that child,” asked Noel Geren, 37.

He and his infant daughter are inseparable but Geren said he does not get to see his 10-year-old son from his first marriage as often as he'd like.

"I've been seeking more time with my son for the last four years and I've spent upwards of $80,000," he explained.

Geren is now among the vocal supporters of Texas House Bill 453, authored by State Rep. James White, R-Woodville, which would give mothers and fathers equal custody during a divorce.

"If this bill passes you're going in there at an equal advantage with the other person," added Geren. "It doesn't touch on any child support. It doesn't touch on anything that would be detrimental to the child. It's still left in the courts hands on what they want to do."

If parents reach a custody agreement before arriving in a family court, judges simply approve it. But more often, mothers win custody which leaves fathers only with visitation. House Bill 453 could change the starting point in family courts giving both parents equal custody from the beginning.

At least five states already have similar laws. But since custody cases are often messy and each one is unique, a former family law judge says the legislature should not mandate what to do with children.

Read more here.

February 15, 2017 in Child Support Enforcement, Divorce (grounds), Property Division, Resources - Child Custody | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, February 14, 2017

Texas bills proposed to make divorce more difficult

From ABC 13 News:

A Texas lawmaker is hoping to get two bills passed that will make it more difficult for couples to divorce.

State Representative Matt Krause (R) filed SB 93 and HB 65. SB 93 aims to strike out no foul or insupportability divorce filings.

"You've got to allege some type of fault, grounds such as abandonment, adultery, mental cruelty and the like," said family law attorney and president elect of the Texas Family Law Foundation Warren Cole.

Cole said repealing the no fault filing will also force couples to air out their dirty laundry. Most divorce filings cite "insupportability" as the reason, in part to maintain a level of privacy.

"To expose their children to that, especially fosters one parent who continues to hold a grudge against the other parent. It defeats effective coparenting, if you will," said Cole.

Krause said he decided to file the bill because the "insupportability" filing makes it just too easy for couples to give up and to divorce.

"I think this just reinforces the sanctity of marriage," said Krause. "I think when we went to no-fault divorce in the 1970s, it in some ways cheapened the institution of marriage."

Krause also filed HB 65, which pushes out the 60 day waiting period for a divorce to 180 days if a couple has children under the age of 18.

Read more here.

February 14, 2017 in Divorce (grounds) | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, February 10, 2017

Oklahoma bill to do away with incompatibility as reason for divorce

From Enterprise-Examiner:

According to the National Center for Health Statistics, Oklahoma has the third highest divorce rate in the United States. Only Arkansas and Nevada have higher rates of couples ending their marriage.

Dunlap filed House Bill 1277 to address that, he said. The bill, titled the "Fairness in Fault Act," would eliminate the ability for couples in Oklahoma to file for divorce based on incompatibility if there are living minor children of the marriage; the parties have been married 10 years or longer; or if either party files a written objection to the granting of a divorce.

The proposed legislation also eliminates required educational programs for couples who file for incompatibility-based divorce to discuss the impact of divorce on children, since Dunlap's bill would not allow incompatibility divorce if there are minor children.

 

Read more here.

February 10, 2017 in Divorce (grounds) | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, January 31, 2017

Court Approved: Family Law Mediators Can Draft Settlement Documents

From The State Bar of Wisconsin:

The Wisconsin Supreme Court has approved a petition that will allow lawyer-mediators to draft and file settlement documents in family law cases. Currently, parties must obtain different legal counsel to perform those legal tasks after mediation.

More frequently, parties attempt to navigate the legal system with no legal help at all. Another layer to limited scope representation rules that took effect two years ago, the new rule will give parties a more affordable solution to resolve family law disputes.

The Director of State Courts filed petition 16-04 on the recommendation of the Wisconsin Supreme Court’s Planning and Policy Advisory Committee (PPAC).

After a public hearing on the petition last week, a 6-1 majority approved the petition as presented. Justice Shirley Abrahamson did not oppose the petition but did not join the majority. She had moved, unsuccessfully, for amendments to clarify minor points that will likely be addressed in a separate writing on the final order.

The new rule will particularly impact cases involving divorces. The expected effective date of the new rule is July 1, 2017, but the court has not yet issued a final order.

Read more here.

January 31, 2017 in Divorce (grounds) | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, January 28, 2017

Pets Will Be Treated Similarly to Children in Alaska Divorce Courts

From The Washington Post:

Divorces can be messy. Leaving aside the very raw emotions involved, there is the matter of splitting property.

Who gets the house? Who gets the couch? Who gets the dog?

If one of those items seems different to you, that’s probably because you, like many Americans, consider pets to be more like family members than furniture. But courts do not. In the eyes of the law, animals are property. So although pet custody battles are often passionate and sometimes truly wacky, courts think of them more prosaically: as part of the “property distribution” in a divorce.

That’s why an amendment to Alaska’s divorce statutes, which took effect last week, is making waves in the world of animal law. It makes Alaska the first state in the country to require courts to take “into consideration the well-being of the animal” and to explicitly empower judges to assign joint custody of pets. In a blog post, the Animal Legal Defense Fund called the well-being provision “groundbreaking and unique.”

“It is significant,” said David Favre, a Michigan State University law professor who specializes in animal law. “For the first time, a state has specifically said that a companion animal has visibility in a divorce proceeding beyond that of property — that the court may award custody on the basis of what is best for the dog, not the human owners.”

Read more here.

 

January 28, 2017 in Custody (parenting plans), Divorce (grounds) | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, November 12, 2016

Divorce: How to remain financially secure

From CNBCAfrica.com:

Unfortunately divorce is an all too common reality in our current times. Statistics reflect that as the year winds down to a close, partners contemplate the reality of dissolving a union that is no longer working.

Most people going through a divorce will agree that the initial stages can be overwhelming – in fact the changes happen so quickly that the alternative - to stick their head in the sand and hide, may well seem a more attractive option.

As with most daunting undertakings, a plan and a checklist will assist. There are a few essential steps that need to be taken in contemplation of divorce proceedings to ensure that the financial settlement will be fair and you will be financially independent and secure once the divorce is finalised.

This is according to Lisa Griffiths, Associate Director of BDO Wealth Advisers, who highlights the following list of “to-do’s” to prepare for divorce:

1.  Establish a team of professional advisers

“Firstly, it is essential that you find your own lawyer and that it should not be a person who has or will act for your spouse.”

“Also ensure that you have your own financial planner – their role will be critical in analysing the financial data. Once again, your planner should not be a person who will also act for your spouse – there is a clear conflict of interest!”

2.  Gather all of your financial information and documentation

“You need to be fully aware of the complete and complex financial situation facing you. Understand all of your debts — not only what the two of you have jointly, but also individually. To avoid any unforeseen surprises, you need to comprehend the full picture on credit card accounts, home loans, car finance and even other items such as personal loans, business debts and retail accounts. You must be prepared to disclose your full financial status.”

“Be prepared. It is so much easier to navigate divorce negotiations if you have the full financial information available early on in the proceedings,” says Griffiths, who goes on to advise that one should also keep a second set of documentation in a safe place.

Read more here.

November 12, 2016 in Divorce (grounds) | Permalink | Comments (1)

Saturday, November 5, 2016

Opening doors for women and children when domestic violence hits home

From The Guardian:

Homeless women need somewhere to live. Landlords need someone to manage their properties. Put the two together and the result is a solution to a significant social issue.

Melbourne’s Property Initiatives Real Estate manages apartments for investors and developers, and directs all profitstowards developing long-term housing for women and children in need.

Jeanette Large is the chief executive of the agency, which operates as a fixed trust under Women’s Property Initiatives (WIP), a not-for-profit company which develops and owns the properties. Large says most of the women housed have escaped family violence.

Indeed, the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare says one-third of the 520,000 people who sought help from Australian homelessness services between 2011 and 2014 did so because of domestic violence.

Launched in April 2015, Large says the real estate agency was created to overcome the funding limitations of philanthropy. WIP has always depended on donations and government grants and needed to find a way to become more self-sustaining while continuing to grow.

Read more here.

November 5, 2016 in Divorce (grounds), Domestic Violence | Permalink | Comments (1)

Sunday, October 23, 2016

Woman who says ex-partner misrepresented wealth wins appeal

From The Guardian:

A woman who says she did not get enough money when an 18-year same-sex relationship ended because a wealthy ex-partner “misrepresented” the size of her fortune has won the latest round of a legal battle.

Helen Roocroft, who is in her 40s and comes from Bolton, Greater Manchester, accepted a settlement of about £200,000 after separating from Carol Ainscow, a property developer, in 2009.

But she said Ainscow, who died aged 55 three years ago, “misrepresented her wealth”. She took legal action against a representative of Ainscow’s estate in the hope of getting more.

Roocroft lost the first round of her fight in a family court two years ago. But three appeal court judges have ruled in her favour. Lord Justice Elias, Lord Justice Kitchin and Lady Justice King said on Friday that the case should be reanalysed by a high court judge.

Read more here.

October 23, 2016 in Divorce (grounds), International | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, October 14, 2016

California Child Support: The 10 Most Frequently Asked Questions Answered

From The Huffington Post:

  1. How is it determined? Child support in California is based on a statewide guideline. The formula by which it is determined is rather complex. As a result, it is usually calculated by attorneys using one of a few computer programs licensed by companies that provide legal research software. The calculation is based upon the number of children, the income of each of the parents, the timeshare that each parent has custody, their tax filing status, and their tax-deductible expenses;

  2. Is there a dollar limit on the amount of support that one can be ordered to pay? Unlike some states, California does not provide for a cap in the amount of support to be ordered. The guideline calculation is the presumptively legal calculation in most cases. There are some very limited instances when the court can deviate from this, discussed below.

  3. What happens if the calculation generates an amount that is clearly higher than what is necessary to raise a child? The guideline calculation may or may not generate such a result. What is necessary to raise a child varies on a case-by-case basis. The law provides that a child is entitled to have a lifestyle commensurate with that of his or her parents. For this reason, a child support calculation that improves the lifestyle of the lower income parent is often upheld by the court. In those instances when the child support amount is so excessive that it bears no reasonable relationship to either the lifestyle of the parents or the amount of support required to raise a child commensurate with that lifestyle, the court may deviate from the guideline.

Read the answers and more here.

 
 

October 14, 2016 in Child Support (establishing), Child Support Enforcement, Divorce (grounds) | Permalink | Comments (0)