EvidenceProf Blog

Editor: Colin Miller
Univ. of South Carolina School of Law

Friday, December 22, 2017

Cyntoia Brown & the "51-To-Life" Project: Kentucky

This is the eighteenth in a series of posts on the "51-To-Life" Project. In Tennessee, if a juvenile is convicted of first-degree murder, there are two sentencing options: (1) life without the possibility of parole; or (2) life with the possibility of parole, with that possibility only existing after the juvenile has been incarcerated for 51 years. In this post, I will explain why Kentucky treats juvenile homicide offenders better than Tennessee. 

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December 22, 2017 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, December 21, 2017

Cyntoia Brown & the "51-To-Life" Project: Kansas

This is the seventeenth in a series of posts on the "51-To-Life" Project. In Tennessee, if a juvenile is convicted of first-degree murder, there are two sentencing options: (1) life without the possibility of parole; or (2) life with the possibility of parole, with that possibility only existing after the juvenile has been incarcerated for 51 years. In this post, I will explain why Kansas treats juvenile homicide offenders better than Tennessee.

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December 21, 2017 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, December 20, 2017

Cyntoia Brown & the "51-To-Life" Project: Iowa

This is the sixteenth in a series of posts on the "51-To-Life" Project. In Tennessee, if a juvenile is convicted of first-degree murder, there are two sentencing options: (1) life without the possibility of parole; or (2) life with the possibility of parole, with that possibility only existing after the juvenile has been incarcerated for 51 years. In this post, I will explain why Iowa treats juvenile homicide offenders better than Tennessee.  

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December 20, 2017 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, December 19, 2017

Cyntoia Brown & the "51-To-Life" Project: Indiana

This is the fifteenth in a series of posts on the "51-To-Life" Project. In Tennessee, if a juvenile is convicted of first-degree murder, there are two sentencing options: (1) life without the possibility of parole; or (2) life with the possibility of parole, with that possibility only existing after the juvenile has been incarcerated for 51 years. In this post, I will explain why Indiana treats juvenile homicide offenders better than Tennessee.  

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December 19, 2017 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, December 18, 2017

Cyntoia Brown & the "51-To-Life" Project: Illinois

This is the fourteenth in a series of posts on the "51-To-Life" Project. In Tennessee, if a juvenile is convicted of first-degree murder, there are two sentencing options: (1) life without the possibility of parole; or (2) life with the possibility of parole, with that possibility only existing after the juvenile has been incarcerated for 51 years. In this post, I will explain why Illinois treats juvenile homicide offenders better than Tennessee.  

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December 18, 2017 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, December 15, 2017

Cyntoia Brown & the "51-To-Life" Project: Idaho

This is the thirteenth in a series of posts on the "51-To-Life" Project. In Tennessee, if a juvenile is convicted of first-degree murder, there are two sentencing options: (1) life without the possibility of parole; or (2) life with the possibility of parole, with that possibility only existing after the juvenile has been incarcerated for 51 years. In this post, I will explain why Idaho treats juvenile homicide offenders better than Tennessee. 

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December 15, 2017 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, December 14, 2017

Cyntoia Brown & the "51-To-Life" Project: Hawaii

This is the twelfth in a series of posts on the "51-To-Life" Project. In Tennessee, if a juvenile is convicted of first-degree murder, there are two sentencing options: (1) life without the possibility of parole; or (2) life with the possibility of parole, with that possibility only existing after the juvenile has been incarcerated for 51 years. In this post, I will explain why Hawaii treats juvenile homicide offenders better than Tennessee. 

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December 14, 2017 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, December 13, 2017

Cyntoia Brown & the "51-To-Life" Project: Georgia

This is the eleventh in a series of posts on the "51-To-Life" Project. In Tennessee, if a juvenile is convicted of first-degree murder, there are two sentencing options: (1) life without the possibility of parole; or (2) life with the possibility of parole, with that possibility only existing after the juvenile has been incarcerated for 51 years. In this post, I will explain why Georgia treats juvenile homicide offenders better than Tennessee. 

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December 13, 2017 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, December 12, 2017

Cyntoia Brown & the "51-To-Life" Project: Florida

This is the tenth in a series of posts on the "51-To-Life" Project. In Tennessee, if a juvenile is convicted of first-degree murder, there are two sentencing options: (1) life without the possibility of parole; or (2) life with the possibility of parole, with that possibility only existing after the juvenile has been incarcerated for 51 years. In this post, I will explain why Florida treats juvenile homicide offenders better than Tennessee. 

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December 12, 2017 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, December 11, 2017

Cyntoia Brown & the "51-To-Life" Project: D.C.

This is the ninth in a series of posts on the "51-To-Life" Project. In Tennessee, if a juvenile is convicted of first-degree murder, there are two sentencing options: (1) life without the possibility of parole; or (2) life with the possibility of parole, with that possibility only existing after the juvenile has been incarcerated for 51 years. In this post, I will explain why the District of Columbia treats juvenile homicide offenders better than Tennessee.

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December 11, 2017 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, December 9, 2017

The Testimony of the Houlihan's Witnesses at the Willie "Pee Wee" Veasy Trial

In the most recent season of the Undisclosed Podcast, we covered the case of Willie Veasy ("Pee Wee"), who was convicted of murdering John Lewis ("The Jamaican"), in North Philadelphia, about 8 miles from the Houlihan's where Veasy worked. The murder occurred shortly before 10:00 P.M. on January 24, 1992, and the strongest evidence of Veasy's innocence is his time card from the Houlihan's, which showed him clocking in at 5:59 P.M. on January 24, 1992 and clocking out at 1:52 or 1:54 A.M. on January 25, 1992.

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December 9, 2017 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, December 8, 2017

Cyntoia Brown & the "51-To-Life" Project: Delaware

This is the eighth in a series of posts on the "51-To-Life" Project. In Tennessee, if a juvenile is convicted of first-degree murder, there are two sentencing options: (1) life without the possibility of parole; or (2) life with the possibility of parole, with that possibility only existing after the juvenile has been incarcerated for 51 years. In this post, I will explain why Delaware treats juvenile homicide offenders better than Tennessee.

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December 8, 2017 | Permalink | Comments (1)

Thursday, December 7, 2017

Cyntoia Brown & the "51-To-Life" Project: Connecticut

This is the seventh in a series of posts on the "51-To-Life" Project. In Tennessee, if a juvenile is convicted of first-degree murder, there are two sentencing options: (1) life without the possibility of parole; or (2) life with the possibility of parole, with that possibility only existing after the juvenile has been incarcerated for 51 years. In this post, I will explain why Connecticut treats juvenile homicide offenders better than Tennessee.

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December 7, 2017 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, December 6, 2017

Thiru Vignarajah & the New Trials & Tossed 100+ Year Prison Terms For 2 Man Convicted of Killing a Prospective Witness

I hadn't noticed this Baltimore Sun article until seeing this tweet. The title of the article is provocative: "2 men sentenced to more than 100 years in killing of witness to receive new trial." Specifically, according to the article,

Derius Duncan, 27, and Clifford Butler, 25, were both convicted of first-degree murder of Ronald Givens* in 2015. But in an opinion issued on Feb. 2, the appeals court wrote that they should receive new trials because information was unfairly used against them from a proffer agreement Butler had made during the investigation.

So, what happened?

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December 6, 2017 | Permalink | Comments (15)

Cyntoia Brown & the "51-To-Life" Project: Colorado

This is the sixth in a series of posts on the "51-To-Life" Project. In Tennessee, if a juvenile is convicted of first-degree murder, there are two sentencing options: (1) life without the possibility of parole; or (2) life with the possibility of parole, with that possibility only existing after the juvenile has been incarcerated for 51 years. In this post, I will explain why Colorado treats juvenile homicide offenders better than Tennessee.

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December 6, 2017 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, December 5, 2017

Cyntoia Brown & the "51-To-Life" Project: California

This is the fifth in a series of posts on the "51-To-Life" Project. In Tennessee, if a juvenile is convicted of first-degree murder, there are two sentencing options: (1) life without the possibility of parole; or (2) life with the possibility of parole, with that possibility only existing after the juvenile has been incarcerated for 51 years. In this post, I will explain why California treats juvenile homicide offenders better than Tennessee.

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December 5, 2017 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, December 4, 2017

Cyntoia Brown & the "51-To-Life" Project: Arkansas

This is the fourth in a series of posts on the "51-To-Life" Project. In Tennessee, if a juvenile is convicted of first-degree murder, there are two sentencing options: (1) life without the possibility of parole; or (2) life with the possibility of parole, with that possibility only existing after the juvenile has been incarcerated for 51 years. In this post, I will explain why Arkansas treats juvenile homicide offenders better than Tennessee.

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December 4, 2017 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, December 1, 2017

Cyntoia Brown & the "51-To-Life" Project: Arizona

This is the third in a series of posts on the "51-To-Life" Project. In Tennessee, if a juvenile is convicted of first-degree murder, there are two sentencing options: (1) life without the possibility of parole; or (2) life with the possibility of parole, with that possibility only existing after the juvenile has been incarcerated for 51 years. In this post, I will explain why Arizona treats juvenile homicide offenders better than Tennessee.

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December 1, 2017 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, November 30, 2017

Cyntoia Brown & the "51-To-Life" Project: Alaska

This is the second in a series of posts on the "51-To-Life" Project. In Tennessee, if a juvenile is convicted of first-degree murder, there are two sentencing options: (1) life without the possibility of parole; or (2) life with the possibility of parole, with that possibility only existing after the juvenile has been incarcerated for 51 years. In this post, I will explain why Alaska treats juvenile homicide offenders better than Tennessee.

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November 30, 2017 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, November 29, 2017

Cyntoia Brown & the "51-To-Life" Project: Alabama

This is the first in a series of posts on the "51-To-Life" Project. In Tennessee, if a juvenile is convicted of first-degree murder, there are two sentencing options: (1) life without the possibility of parole; or (2) life with the possibility of parole, with that possibility only existing after the juvenile has been incarcerated for 51 years. In this post, I will explain why Alabama treats juvenile homicide offenders better than Tennessee.

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November 29, 2017 | Permalink | Comments (0)