EvidenceProf Blog

Editor: Colin Miller
Univ. of South Carolina School of Law

A Member of the Law Professor Blogs Network

Sunday, June 14, 2009

The Best Of Everything: Fourth Circuit Erroneously Finds That Best Evidence Rule Doesn't Apply In Firearms Appeal

Federal Rule of Evidence 1002, the Best Evidence or Original Document Rule, indicates that

To prove the content of a writing, recording, or photograph, the original writing, recording, or photograph is required, except as otherwise provided in these rules or by Act of Congress. 

As I tell my Evidence students, this Rule is oft misunderstood, not only by law students, but also by lawyers and even judges. The recent opinion of the Fourth Circuit in United States v. Smith, 2009 WL 1452045 (4th Cir. 2009), is a good example of judges completely misunderstanding the Best Evidence Rule.

In Smith, Cordell Smith was convicted of possessing with intent to distribute a quantity of crack cocaine, using and carrying one or more firearms during and in relation to a drug-trafficking crime, and possessing one or more firearms, having been previously convicted of a felony. To prove the interstate nexus element of the felon in-possession count, the government presented the testimony of Special Agent Andrew Cheramie of the ATF that firearms recovered from Smith's apartment had been manufactured in states other than North Carolina. Smith's attorney objected to the proposed testimony of Special Agent Cheramie on the ground that it would violate Federal Rule of Evidence 1002. He argued that Cheramie's testimony, which was based on written reference materials and ATF computer databases, none of which were offered into evidence, violated the Best Evidence Rule. The district court overruled the objection and allowed Cheramie to testify without requiring him to introduce any reference materials into evidence

Smith subsequently appealed, and the Fourth Circuit disposed of his appeal as follows:

Smith argues that "the materials on which Cheramie relied were clearly 'writings' or 'recordings' under Rule 1001" and therefore "Cheramie's testimony plainly sought to prove the content of writings or recordings because Cheramie himself had no independent, first-hand knowledge of where the firearms were manufactured,” in violation of Rule 1002....

Smith's argument, however, appears to rest on a misconception of the "best evidence rule" and Rule 1002. In asserting that Cheramie should not have been allowed to testify to the fact of a firearm's place of manufacture without introducing the writings and other materials from which he learned that fact, Smith suggests that the best evidence rule required the government to introduce the best evidence of that fact, i.e., the writings and other materials from which Cheramie learned the fact, especially when Cheramie did not have personal first-hand knowledge of the fact. But Federal Rule of Evidence 1002 is not nearly so broad.

Federal Rule of Evidence 1002 provides in pertinent part: "To prove the content of a writing, recording, or photograph, the original writing, recording, or photograph is required." As the Rule's language states, the Rule applies to the circumstance where the proponent seeks "to prove the content" of a document. The Rule exists to afford guarantees against inaccuracies and fraud by requiring that the original of the document be offered, subject to exceptions....

In this case, the government never sought to prove the content of any writing or recording relating to the firearms or their places of manufacture. It sought only to prove the fact that the firearms were manufactured in States other than North Carolina, where they were recovered during the search of Smith's apartment. The place of the firearms' manufacture was a fact existing independently of the content of any book, document, recording, or writing. Just because Special Agent Cheramie consulted books and computer databases in reaching his conclusion about the firearms' place of manufacture does not mean that his testimony was offered “to prove the content” of the books and computer files. Accordingly, Rule 1002 did not require submission of the books and computer files into evidence.  

With due respect to the Fourth Circuit judges who decided Smith, they were the ones who had the misconception regarding the "best evidence rule" and Rule 1002. Clearly, the government sought to prove the contents of the writings and other materials from which Cheramie learned that firearms recovered from Smith's apartment had been manufactured in States other than North Carolina. As Smith noted, Cheramie had no independent personal knowledge of where those firearms were manufactured. Instead, his knowledge of where those firearms were manufactured was dependent on the writings and other materials. Thus, his testimony was, in effect, proving the contents of the writings and other materials because he had no personal knowledge of where the firearms were manufactured. Accordingly, Cheramie's testimony triggered the Best Evidence Rule, and the Fourth Circuit's conclusion was erroneous.  

-CM

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/evidenceprof/2009/06/1002us-v-smith----f3d------2009-wl-1452045ca4-nc2009.html

| Permalink

TrackBack URL for this entry:

http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d8341bfae553ef01156fb7390a970c

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference The Best Of Everything: Fourth Circuit Erroneously Finds That Best Evidence Rule Doesn't Apply In Firearms Appeal:

Comments

Post a comment