EvidenceProf Blog

Editor: Colin Miller
Univ. of South Carolina School of Law

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Monday, March 2, 2009

My New Article: Dismissed with Prejudice: Why Application of the Anti-Jury Impeachment Rule to Allegations of Racial, Religious, or Other Bias Violates the Right to Present a Defense

Readers of this blog know that I have covered a number of cases over the last year and a half where courts have applied the anti-jury impeachment rule to preclude jurors from impeaching their verdicts after trial through allegations of racial, religious, or other bias.  Some of these posts can be found here, here, here, here, here, here, and here.  Well, I have finally completed my article, Dismissed with Prejudice: Why Application of the Anti-Jury Impeachment Rule to Allegations of Racial, Religious, or Other Bias Violates the Right to Present a Defense.  The article argues that court applying Rule 606(b) to preclude allegations of juror bias violate criminal defendants' right to present a defense.  Here is the abstract for the article:

It is well established that the presence of a biased juror is a structural defect not subject to a harmless error analysis; however, courts repeatedly have precluded criminal defendants from proving such bias by applying Rule of Evidence 606(b) to prevent jurors from impeaching their verdicts through allegations of racial, religious, or other prejudice by jurors.  Court also routinely have held that application of the Rule in such cases does not violate the Sixth Amendment right to an impartial jury based upon the Supreme Court’s conclusion in Tanner v. United States that the Rule did not violate the right to a competent jury.

Criminal defendants, however, should be able to rely upon another Sixth Amendment right to allow them to present post-trial juror testimony regarding racial, religious, or other bias by jurors.  Since its 1967 opinion in Washington v. Texas, the Supreme Court has declared that the Compulsory Process Clause renders unto criminal defendants the “right to present a defense” and has found that courts violate this right by applying rules of evidence in a manner that is arbitrary or disproportionate to the purposes that they were designed to serve.  This article argues that when courts preclude jurors from impeaching their verdicts through evidence of juror racial, religious, or other bias, they apply Rule 606(b) in a way that is arbitrary and disproportionate to the purposes that the Rule is designed to serve and thus violate criminal defendants’ right to present a defense." 

You can download a copy of the article from SSRN with a free subscription.  If any readers of the blog get the chance to read it and would like to share any comments/suggestions, I would greatly appreciate it.

-CM

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/evidenceprof/2009/03/my-new-article.html

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» Invading the province of the jury. from Court-Martial Trial Practice
Prof. Colin Miller has published an article about Fed. (Mil.) R. Evid. 606. Prof. Miller argues that, "Rule 606(b) to preclude allegations of juror bias violate criminal defendants' right to present a defense."Dismissed with Prejudice: Why Application ... [Read More]

Tracked on Mar 2, 2009 12:45:35 PM

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