Thursday, June 23, 2011

And Now for Some Good News?

Earlier this week, it was hard to tell whether the cries coming from southern California were of joy or despair.  San Diego Gas & Electric is in the process of building a massive transmission line from the Imperial Valley to its load center in San Diego.  Increasingly, it looks like SDG&E will be able to fend off the numerous legal challenges to the project and bring scores of renewable electrons home.

The Sunrise Powerlink project is, by any measure, impressive.  According to SDG&E, the line will run nearly 120 miles.  It will cost almost $2 billion to build.  It will create hundreds of construction jobs and "thousands" of jobs in renewable energy.  It should save consumers $100 million annually.  It will give SDG&E access to numerous renewables projects.  And it will have a capacity of 1,000 MW, enough to power "650,000 homes."

All this sounds like a good thing.  One would think so.  It is well established that one of the biggest impediments to renewables is the need for more transmission lines -- lots of them in many places.  On that score, the Sunrise Powerlink project should be most welcome news.  SDG&E repeatedly has pointed out that this project can only help the state achieve its renewable portfolio mandate of 33% renewable electricity by 2020.

Still, the fact that the Sunrise project has been plagued by litigation highlights the contentious natureof completing any large energy developmenttoday.  NIMBYism reigns not only when developments harm the environment but also when they help.  Companies building environmentally beneficial projects know well by now that environmentalism is not a proper noun, a capitalized word representing a unified front.  It's very much lower-cased; disaggregated, splintered, fractured, multifarious, subject to hijacking.

This, then, underscores three important points that are becoming more and more obvious as we, it increasingly seems, begin a transition to a more sustainable energy infrastructure.  First, the process will be slow.  Sunrise is all about renewables but still facesopposition.  What will be the fate of more mixed projects?  Second, if we are to move to renewables, legislation facilitating transmission build-outs will be extremely helpful, if not necessary.  Utilities clearly prefer big, centrally planned projects.  Without transmission, they can't go forward.  Third, a united front will be necessary.  Climate change certainly has been a galvanizing force for environmentalists over the last decade, and more.  If they want meaningful progress, environmentalists cannot say no to everything.  Some things have to be yes, and the yes needs to be resounding.  That especially goes for projects that have both environmental and economic benefits.

Then there will be some good news indeed.

-Lincoln Davies

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/environmental_law/2011/06/and-now-for-some-good-news.html

Climate Change, Current Affairs, Economics, Energy, Sustainability | Permalink

TrackBack URL for this entry:

http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d8341bfae553ef014e8958ac31970d

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference And Now for Some Good News?:

Comments

Post a comment