Thursday, April 28, 2011

Environmental Justice @ 2011

No doubt that one of the most important forces in environmentalism over the last three decades has been the environmental justice movement.  Leaders in this field -- Bunyan Bryant, Robert BullardSheila Foster, Eileen Gauna, Hazel Johnson, and Beverly Wright, to name only a few -- changed the way environmental issues are seen.  They point out that much of environmental protection has been myopic, and that its focus must change: to include equity, gender, income, race, and, ultimately, justice.

This week, the Department of Energy, the EPA, and the Department of the Interior, among others, are sponsoring what looks to be a phenomenal conference on the state of environmental justice today.  From the press release:

The U.S. Department of Energy, along with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the U.S. Department of Interior, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the National Small Town Alliance, the Howard University School of Law and others, kicked off the State of Environmental Justice in America 2011 Conference today in Washington, D.C.

This year's conference theme is "Building the Clean Energy Economy with Equity," and will focus on climate change, green jobs and equity for low-income, minority and Tribal populations. The goal is to continue bringing together participants from Federal agencies, academia, business and industry, nonprofit organizations, faith-based organizations and local communities to participate in a dialogue on achieving equality of environmental protection.

If you are in or near D.C., it should be time well spent.  The conference's website is here.  The program is here.

-Lincoln Davies

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/environmental_law/2011/04/environmental-justice-2011.html

Australia, Economics, Energy, Social Science, Sustainability, Toxic and Hazardous Substances | Permalink

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