Wednesday, August 5, 2015

Tech Innovations Announced in Conjunction With the White House Conference on Aging

I was reading a blog post from Aging in Place Technology Watch which offered a roundup of tech announcements coming out of the 2015 White House Conference on Aging. I was intrigued by the UberAssist project which according to the announcement on Uber's website

Today, Uber will participate in the White House Conference on Aging and discuss Uber’s efforts to engage the senior community. At the event, we will announce the launch of a pilot program for community-based senior outreach. In cities across the country, Uber will offer free technology tutorials and free rides at select retirement communities and senior centers. Alongside public and private sector representatives, we hope to further the conversation about the way technology adoption can improve older adults’ day-to-day lives.

Uber has some projects going in Florida, for example, in Gainesville, Uber 

is working with the City ...  to offer on-demand transportation for residents of two senior centers as part of a six month program. Anytime a resident at a participating senior center needs a ride, he or she can request one at an even more affordable rate because of support from the city. Free technology tutorials will be available throughout, so residents of the participating centers can feel comfortable and at ease using Uber. Uber is also piloting a similar senior ride program in partnership with the Town of Miami Lakes.

I also was interested to learn about the announcement from Phillips about the AgingWell Hub which is

a unique new collaborative research and development initiative for open innovation that will  examine and share solutions for aging well. The initiative will identify new  technologies, products and services, as well as provide thought leadership in  collaboration with older adults, caregivers, healthcare systems, payers, policy  makers, corporate innovators, entrepreneurs and academia.  The AWH will also  seek solutions to improve technology adoption among older adults and make aging  well a reality for more people, by enabling them to better connect with their  communities and healthcare providers. 

You can read all of the WHCOA partner press releases and announcements here.

August 5, 2015 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Other, Web/Tech | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, August 4, 2015

Virtual Heartbreak

The New York Times ran a story on July 17, 2015 on how scammers are targeting older individuals on internet dating sites. Swindlers Target Older Women on Dating Websites tells the stories of several elders who ended up sending significant sums of money to scammers who had developed virtual relationships with these elders.  This high-tech version of the "romance con" has resulted in the legislature in at least one state, Vermont, to consider "pass[ing] a law requiring online dating sites to notify members quickly when there is suspicious activity on their accounts or when another member has been barred on suspicion of financial fraud." As well, the story explains, the proliferation of the virtual version of the romance con was the impetus for action from AARP.

Despite warnings, the digital version of the romance con is now sufficiently widespread that AARP’s Fraud Watch Network in June urged online dating sites to institute more safeguards to protect against such fraud. The safeguards it suggests include using computer algorithms to detect suspicious language patterns, searching for fake profiles, alerting members who have been in contact with someone using a fake profile and providing more education so members are aware of romance cons.

The AARP network recommends that from the beginning, dating site members use Google’s “search by image” to see if the suitor’s picture appears on other sites with different names. If an email from “a potential suitor seems suspicious, cut and paste it into Google and see if the words pop up on any romance scam sites,” the network advised.

On AARP's site, individuals can learn more about these digital romance cons, sign an on-line petition to dating sites to adopt safety measures, and learn 10 tips on how to spot a romance scammer and 5 tips to protect oneself from this "virtual heartbreak".

August 4, 2015 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Other, Web/Tech | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, July 23, 2015

Check Out Aging.gov

As part of the 2015 White House Conference on Aging, HHS posted a blog entry announcing the launch of a new website, aging.gov. According to the blog post from Nora Super, executive director of the WHCOA, "[o]ne of the lessons we learned through this journey is that older Americans, their families and other caregivers sometimes need help navigating the array of federal, state and local supports that are available." The website includes information on healthy aging, retirement security, and elder justice as well as links to various resources. Check it out!

July 23, 2015 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Web/Tech, Weblogs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, May 1, 2015

Japan's Demographic Trend -- Aging -- Inspires New Technology

I strongly suspect that my Blogging colleague Becky Morgan, who embraces new technology, will approve.  As detailed in the New York Time's business section, Japan's leadership position in a surprising market sector-- as the nation with the highest percentage of older citizens -- has inspired innovation:

Japan is an incubator of aging.... Twenty-five percent of its population, or 33 million people, are age 65 or older, more than double the global average.

 

IBM, Apple and Japan Post Group, a giant postal service, bank and insurer, declared on Thursday that they were joining to deliver a new technology service to the fast-growing market of older Japanese adults. The service involves equipping Japan’s silver generation with iPads loaded with software apps to help them communicate with family and friends, monitor their health, and buy goods and services.

For more read Apple, IBM and Japan Post See Profit in the Old-Age Market

May 1, 2015 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Web/Tech | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, April 17, 2015

Searching for Answers to Questions about Continuing Care: Point/Counter Point

Scott E. Townsley, a very bright attorney, an adjunct associate professor at UMBC's Erickson School of Aging Studies, and a principal with CliftonLawsonAllen LLP, invited me to join him recently for a presentation to the 2015 Mid-Atlantic Region Resident Council Conference in Silver Spring, Md. (The lovely D.C. area cherry trees were in full bloom that day.) Cherry Trees at Riderwood Community 2015

Our theme was "Hot Topics in Continuing Care."  Scott, a regular consultant to nonprofit CCRCs, used his deep experience in senior housing to outline his perspective on the biggest issues facing CCRCs. In preparation for my part, I reached out to my contacts in resident groups around the country and asked them to share with me their biggest concerns. 

We then trimmed down our two respective lists and used a Point/Counter Point approach to the debate.  Do any of our readers remember 60 Minutes' James Kirkpatrick and Shana Alexander?  (Okay, how about Dan Aykroyd and Jane Curtin's lampoon of the Point/ Counter Point format?  I think it is fair to say that we were less political than the first combo, and more polite -- if less humorous -- than the SNL crew.  But we had fun.)

With a tip of the hat to David Letterman in borrowing his "top ten" format, here is a very distilled version of my list of Resident Concerns:

10. What does it really mean to be a nonprofit CCRC in 2015?

9.  Do we need to worry about conversions of nonprofit CCRCs to for-profit?

8.  What is the right response to the trend that residents are older and more disabled, even when first entering the community?

Continue reading

April 17, 2015 in Consumer Information, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Discrimination, Health Care/Long Term Care, Housing, Property Management, Retirement, State Statutes/Regulations, Web/Tech | Permalink | Comments (4) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, January 14, 2015

Follow the happenings with the White House Conference on Aging 2015

Directly from the White House:

The first White House Conference on Aging (WHCoA) was held in 1961, with subsequent conferences in 1971, 1981, 1995, and 2005. These conferences have been viewed as catalysts for development of aging policy over the past 50 years. The conferences generated ideas and momentum prompting the establishment of and/or key improvements in many of the programs that represent America’s commitment to older Americans including: Medicare, Medicaid, Social Security, and the Older Americans Act.

Historic photo: Overarching view of the attendees of the 1961 White House Conference on Aging

The 2015 White House Conference on Aging

2015 marks the 50th anniversary of Medicare, Medicaid, and the Older Americans Act, as well as the 80th anniversary of Social Security. The 2015 White House Conference on Aging is an opportunity to recognize the importance of these key programs as well as to look ahead to the issues that will help shape the landscape for older Americans for the next decade.

In the past, conference processes were determined by statute with the form and structure directed by Congress through legislation authorizing the Older Americans Act. To date, Congress has not reauthorized the Older Americans Act, and the pending bill does not include a statutory requirement or framework for the 2015 conference.

However, the White House is committed to hosting a White House Conference on Aging in 2015 and intends to seek broad public engagement and work closely with stakeholders in developing the conference. We also plan to use web tools and social media to encourage as many older Americans as possible to participate. We are engaging with stakeholders and members of the public about the issues and ideas most important to older individuals, their caregivers, and families. We also encourage people to submit their ideas directly through the Get Involved section on this website.

January 14, 2015 in Consumer Information, Federal Statutes/Regulations, Other, Programs/CLEs, Web/Tech, Webinars, Weblogs | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Friday, September 5, 2014

Technology for Caregiving-A Tool, Not A Replacement?

We have several posts about the use of technology in caregiving.  I cover it in my classes (do you?) and in particular, I want my students to think about consent, privacy and autonomy.  Several years ago, there were stories about PARO, a therapeutic interactive robot designed to resemble a baby harp seal, and its use with certain individuals, including those residing in nursing homes.  (The company website has quite a bit of information about PARO, including research papers.)  There are lots of different types of technologies available, whether assistive or monitoring. 

A recent article in the San Jose Mercury News  (and picked up by my local paper, the Tampa Bay Times) Meet Paro, a robot designed to help the elderly, reports on the results from using Paro in a local retirement community.    This article looks at the issues of ethics as well as how the use of such "socially assistive" robots results in less isolation for some residents.  The story highlights the interactions of some residents with the robot.  The article also reviews the debate regarding using such robots.  For example, Sherry Turkle, an MIT social scientist is quoted in the article offering a concern that

"faux relationships" with machines may detract from human connections..."It's not just that older people are supposed to be talking. Younger people are supposed to be listening... [and] ... [w]e are showing very little interest in what our elders have to say." Robots like Paro may offer comfort to isolated seniors, Turkle has written, but it could "make us less likely to look for other solutions for their care."

Another expert, Professor Maja Mataric,  offers a counter-view, that such robots provide both "valuable reinforcement and motivation" and notes that

While robots aren't a complete substitute for human interaction, she stressed, they may play a vital role since "there just simply aren't enough people to take care of our very large and growing elderly population." ... [and] added: "We need to think about the humane and ethical use of technology, because these things are coming."

I think this is a great topic for discussion with students.  Let me know what you think.

September 5, 2014 in Cognitive Impairment, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Health Care/Long Term Care, Web/Tech | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, August 11, 2014

New York teen wins $50,000 prize for invention aiding Alzheimer's patients

Via Reuters:

A New York teenager whose grandfather suffers from Alzheimer's disease won a $50,000 science prize for developing wearable sensors that send mobile alerts when a dementia patient begins to wander away from bed, officials said on Wednesday.  Kenneth Shinozuka, 15, who took home the Scientific American Science in Action Award, said his invention was inspired by his grandfather's symptoms, which frequently caused him to wander from bed in the middle of the night and hurt himself.  "I will never forget how deeply moved my entire family was when they first witnessed my sensor detecting Grandfather's wandering," Shinozuka said in a statement. "At that moment, I was struck by the power of technology to change lives."  His invention uses coin-sized wireless sensors that are worn on the feet of a potential wanderer. The sensors detect pressure caused when the person stands up, triggering an audible alert on a caregiver's smartphone using an app.

The award honors a project that aims to make a practical difference by addressing an environmental, health or resources challenge, said Scientific American Editor in Chief Mariette DiChristina.

Read more at Reuters.

August 11, 2014 in Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Grant Deadlines/Awards, Other, Web/Tech | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, June 12, 2014

IRS Phone Forum on "Retirement Plans After Windsor" on June 26

With thanks to Phoenix, Arizona Elder Law practitioner Thomas Murphy for the heads up, the Internal Revenue Service is offering a free phone forum on "Retirement Plans after Windsor," on Thursday, June 26 from 2:00 p.m. to 3 p.m. Eastern time.  The forum will be "rebroadcast" on July 8. 

Not a lot of details are available on-line about the forum.  Here are links to basic information, plus the June 26  registration page (registration is required, but it does not appear the forum is limited to registered agents). 

Here's a link to a separate registration site for the "rebroadcast" on July 8.

June 12, 2014 in Programs/CLEs, Retirement, Web/Tech, Webinars | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, May 26, 2014

Tobor to the Rescue? Home Medication Dispensers

When I was a child, there was a movie -- or maybe a tv show -- with a friendly robot named Tobor.  Tobor soon became an imaginary friend for the neighborhood children, and conveniently, someone we could blame when we forgot to close a door or knocked something over.  "Tobor did it!"

Fast forward many years and last week, during a meeting at my Area Agency on Aging, I learned the AAA had entered into a contract with a company that makes home medication dispensers to provide the devices at a modest cost to clients in the county.  "Tobor for the Boomer Generation!"

The device, about the size of a blender or coffee machine, can be pre-loaded with a large number of doses of different kinds of medications with different dispensing schedules, and with recorded messages such as "Drink with water."  The machine signals the client to take the revealed dose, and continues the signal until the medication is removed.  It can also be programmed to contact a family member about a missed dose.  Of course, there are limits to the utility of any automated device, as the client must still have the capacity to follow the directions and not simply discard the dose. 

It will be interesting to see, over time, whether (and which kind of ) Tobors are effective innovations with long-range satisfaction and utility.  I do seem to have a lot of ignored contraptions on my own kitchen counter. 

May 26, 2014 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Health Care/Long Term Care, Web/Tech | Permalink | Comments (2) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, May 6, 2014

Updated Federal Courts App available for Android and IPhone

An updated Federal Courts app is for Android, iPhone, iPad is now available.  The app provides access to PACER, the federal rules of civil, criminal, bankruptcy, and appellate procedure, federal rules of evidence, local rules for EVERY federal court in the country, and more.  It's a must have for all practitioners. And it's only 3 bucks!!!

To download search the relevant app store for Fed Courts, or go here:

Android

IPhone

May 6, 2014 in Legal Practice/Practice Management, Web/Tech | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, April 9, 2014

Submit Guardianship Related Resources to NGN's New Resource Library

The National Guardianship Network is compling reources for the online International Resource Library on Adult Guardianship. If you have a resource that could be beneficial to your fellow professionals, please consider sharing it on our online library. Forms, manuals, checklists, brochures and more will be posted as a shared resource in this library. Documents can be emailed to info@nationalguardianshipnetwork.org (use the subject “resource library” so that that these materials are not confused with presenters’ Congress handouts). Please provide, in English, a description regarding the document(s) you send, so that we can name and categorize them. Resources may be in English or in the language in which they were written. Please respect U.S. Copyright laws.

April 9, 2014 in Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Web/Tech | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, April 8, 2014

Update on Stanford Center on Longevity 2013-14 Design Challenge

Last September we noted the kick-off  of the Stanford Center on Longevity's world-wide Design Challenge that encouraged teams to tackle the need for "solutions that help keep people with cognitive impairments independent as long as possible."  In March, PBS News Hour had a nice piece on the partnership that launched the competition. 

The latest news is that 7 teams are finalists from among 52 entries from 15 countries. The final phase of the competition will take place on April 10.  As explained by Stanford's news release:

"They are coming to Stanford to make their final pitches for a $10,000 first prize and connections to industry leaders and investors. There will be talks by a number of distinguished speakers, a panel of Silicon Valley investors, and the announcement of next years’ challenge. Join us for what should be a great day of learning and networking."

Ticket information here. 

 

April 8, 2014 in Cognitive Impairment, Current Affairs, Housing, Web/Tech | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Sunday, March 30, 2014

MOOC on Understanding Dementia to Begin March 31

Last fall, our Elder Law Prof Blog reported on the available of a MOOC (Massive Open On-Line Course) offered by John Hopkins School of Nursing on "Care of Elders with Alzheimer's Disease and other Major Neurogonitive Disorders."  Did any of our readers participate?  We welcome reports on your reactions to the experience.

Now there's a another MOOC opportunity, this time from the University of Tazmania on "Understanding Dementia."  The 9-week course is described as "building on the latest in international research on dementia." And, true to the spirit of MOOCs, it is free and open to anyone to register, here.  The course begins Monday, March 31 -- so hurry to register.

March 30, 2014 in Cognitive Impairment, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Science, Web/Tech | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, March 19, 2014

Sobering video tells the tale of Alzheimer's

Alzheimer's Association Alzheimer's Disease Facts and FiguDripping amoreres 2014

Every 67 seconds someone in the United States develops Alzheimer's disease. More than 5 million Americans are living with the disease. Learn the facts. Help wipe out Alzheimer's disease.

Watch this video to learn about the extent and toll that Alzheimer's disease is taking on society.

 

 

 

 

March 19, 2014 in Cognitive Impairment, Statistics, Web/Tech | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, March 5, 2014

ACL releases fact sheets on advance health care planning via the ElderCare Locator

The Administration for Community Living recently published a series of fact sheets related to advance care planning on the Elder Care Locator. The Fact Sheets are designed to help older adults and their families plan for the care they want when they have a serious illness. The Fact Sheets are about care planning generally, care during advanced cancer and dementia, family caregivers, and the services that can help families during serious illness. Each one provides links to additional resources that may assist families as they face serious illness. View the fact sheets and access downloadable pdf copies here.

March 5, 2014 in Advance Directives/End-of-Life, Health Care/Long Term Care, Web/Tech | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, February 27, 2014

Great program to help create indexes

A few weeks ago, I needed to compile a list of words and phrases that would enable my publisher to create an index to a forthcoming book.  I found a very cool software program called  Hermetic Word Frequency Counter that really made the job easy.  The program reviews the entire document (in this case, a 400 page book) and lists every word in the document (other than a pre-set list of 100-odd words like "and" "or" "the" etc.) and the number of times that word appears.  The information is presented in descending order.  The program runs quickly, and it made a task that could have taken hours incredibly simple.

Hermetic Word Frequency Counter isn't free, but I think it was worth the $39.99 that I paid for a perpetual license.  Check it out here.

February 27, 2014 in Web/Tech | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, February 4, 2014

National Disability Navigator Resource Collaborative Helps People with Disabilities Find Health Insurance

The American Association on Health and Disability has launched a new website that aims to help personw with disabilities secure health insurance.  Navigators and other enrollment specialists can now access better information to help people with disabilities find health care coverage in the federal and state exchanges. The tools are cross-disability programs developed by the National Disability Navigator Resource Collaborative (NDNRC). The 12-month collaborative was made possible by a one-year grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

 

The navigator website was launched December 1, 2013 at www.nationaldisabilitynavigator.org. There is also an accompanying training guide, the Guide to Disability for Healthcare Insurance Marketplace Navigators. The guide describes the barriers to health insurance people with disabilities have encountered in the past, how disability laws affect the marketplace, what navigators need to know about disability, and much more. It is available at: http://www.nationaldisabilitynavigator.org/ndnrc-materials/disability-guide/.

 

The recently launched website also features the latest health coverage news and resources of interest to those helping consumers with disabilities find health coverage (and to consumers as well). The website also features a blog, which, among other things, gives everyone the opportunity to tell their own health coverage enrollment story. In the near future, the website will publish 17 fact sheets with more information on disability-specific issues and individual state information as well.

More info here.

February 4, 2014 in Consumer Information, Health Care/Long Term Care, Web/Tech | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, November 26, 2013

This week's cool tool: Family Health Portrait

VIA the ACL:
 
Thanksgiving is Family Health History Day: Online Tool Available to Help Organize and Share Useful Info
 
As families gather to celebrate Thanksgiving, Acting Surgeon General Boris Lushniakencourages everyone to spend time talking about their health. “A patient’s family health history is an easy, quick and inexpensive way to get a rough estimate of how strongly a particular disease runs in a family. Knowing your family health history can help your clinician identify screening and treatment options that are personalized for you,” says Lushniak.
 
The Surgeon General’s My Family Health Portrait tool is a free and easy way to record health history. Consumers are able to capture and organize their family members’ information and share it with other family members and health care professionals.  Read more.
 

November 26, 2013 in Health Care/Long Term Care, Web/Tech | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Woof to Wash’ laundry machine lets dogs help people with disabilities

Via Yahoo News:

A man from Leeds, England has invented a dog-controlled washing machine.  The "Woof to Wash" Harrietmachine has a bark-activated "on" switch. A special "paw" button allows the pooch to easily open and close the machine's door.  The inventor, John Middleton of U.K. laundry company JTM, intends for the "Woof to Wash" machine to make laundry an easier task for people living with disabilities by letting them delegate the trickier parts of the job to support dogs who have been trained to load and empty the machines.  "We developed this machine because mainstream products with complex digital controls seldom meet the needs of the disabled user," he said.  The Sheffield charity Support Dogs is training the animals to operate the new machines.

"People who are visually impaired, have manual dexterity problems, autism or learning difficulties can find the complexity of modern day washing machines too much," Middleton told Anorak. "I had been working on a single program washing machine to make things easier, and there was a lot of demand for it."

Read more here

November 26, 2013 in Cognitive Impairment, Health Care/Long Term Care, Retirement, Web/Tech | Permalink | TrackBack (0)