Wednesday, April 9, 2014

Submit Guardianship Related Resources to NGN's New Resource Library

The National Guardianship Network is compling reources for the online International Resource Library on Adult Guardianship. If you have a resource that could be beneficial to your fellow professionals, please consider sharing it on our online library. Forms, manuals, checklists, brochures and more will be posted as a shared resource in this library. Documents can be emailed to info@nationalguardianshipnetwork.org (use the subject “resource library” so that that these materials are not confused with presenters’ Congress handouts). Please provide, in English, a description regarding the document(s) you send, so that we can name and categorize them. Resources may be in English or in the language in which they were written. Please respect U.S. Copyright laws.

April 9, 2014 in Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Web/Tech | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, April 8, 2014

Update on Stanford Center on Longevity 2013-14 Design Challenge

Last September we noted the kick-off  of the Stanford Center on Longevity's world-wide Design Challenge that encouraged teams to tackle the need for "solutions that help keep people with cognitive impairments independent as long as possible."  In March, PBS News Hour had a nice piece on the partnership that launched the competition. 

The latest news is that 7 teams are finalists from among 52 entries from 15 countries. The final phase of the competition will take place on April 10.  As explained by Stanford's news release:

"They are coming to Stanford to make their final pitches for a $10,000 first prize and connections to industry leaders and investors. There will be talks by a number of distinguished speakers, a panel of Silicon Valley investors, and the announcement of next years’ challenge. Join us for what should be a great day of learning and networking."

Ticket information here. 

 

April 8, 2014 in Cognitive Impairment, Current Affairs, Housing, Web/Tech | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Sunday, March 30, 2014

MOOC on Understanding Dementia to Begin March 31

Last fall, our Elder Law Prof Blog reported on the available of a MOOC (Massive Open On-Line Course) offered by John Hopkins School of Nursing on "Care of Elders with Alzheimer's Disease and other Major Neurogonitive Disorders."  Did any of our readers participate?  We welcome reports on your reactions to the experience.

Now there's a another MOOC opportunity, this time from the University of Tazmania on "Understanding Dementia."  The 9-week course is described as "building on the latest in international research on dementia." And, true to the spirit of MOOCs, it is free and open to anyone to register, here.  The course begins Monday, March 31 -- so hurry to register.

March 30, 2014 in Cognitive Impairment, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Science, Web/Tech | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, March 19, 2014

Sobering video tells the tale of Alzheimer's

Alzheimer's Association Alzheimer's Disease Facts and FiguDripping amoreres 2014

Every 67 seconds someone in the United States develops Alzheimer's disease. More than 5 million Americans are living with the disease. Learn the facts. Help wipe out Alzheimer's disease.

Watch this video to learn about the extent and toll that Alzheimer's disease is taking on society.

 

 

 

 

March 19, 2014 in Cognitive Impairment, Statistics, Web/Tech | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, March 5, 2014

ACL releases fact sheets on advance health care planning via the ElderCare Locator

The Administration for Community Living recently published a series of fact sheets related to advance care planning on the Elder Care Locator. The Fact Sheets are designed to help older adults and their families plan for the care they want when they have a serious illness. The Fact Sheets are about care planning generally, care during advanced cancer and dementia, family caregivers, and the services that can help families during serious illness. Each one provides links to additional resources that may assist families as they face serious illness. View the fact sheets and access downloadable pdf copies here.

March 5, 2014 in Advance Directives/End-of-Life, Health Care/Long Term Care, Web/Tech | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, February 27, 2014

Great program to help create indexes

A few weeks ago, I needed to compile a list of words and phrases that would enable my publisher to create an index to a forthcoming book.  I found a very cool software program called  Hermetic Word Frequency Counter that really made the job easy.  The program reviews the entire document (in this case, a 400 page book) and lists every word in the document (other than a pre-set list of 100-odd words like "and" "or" "the" etc.) and the number of times that word appears.  The information is presented in descending order.  The program runs quickly, and it made a task that could have taken hours incredibly simple.

Hermetic Word Frequency Counter isn't free, but I think it was worth the $39.99 that I paid for a perpetual license.  Check it out here.

February 27, 2014 in Web/Tech | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, February 4, 2014

National Disability Navigator Resource Collaborative Helps People with Disabilities Find Health Insurance

The American Association on Health and Disability has launched a new website that aims to help personw with disabilities secure health insurance.  Navigators and other enrollment specialists can now access better information to help people with disabilities find health care coverage in the federal and state exchanges. The tools are cross-disability programs developed by the National Disability Navigator Resource Collaborative (NDNRC). The 12-month collaborative was made possible by a one-year grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

 

The navigator website was launched December 1, 2013 at www.nationaldisabilitynavigator.org. There is also an accompanying training guide, the Guide to Disability for Healthcare Insurance Marketplace Navigators. The guide describes the barriers to health insurance people with disabilities have encountered in the past, how disability laws affect the marketplace, what navigators need to know about disability, and much more. It is available at: http://www.nationaldisabilitynavigator.org/ndnrc-materials/disability-guide/.

 

The recently launched website also features the latest health coverage news and resources of interest to those helping consumers with disabilities find health coverage (and to consumers as well). The website also features a blog, which, among other things, gives everyone the opportunity to tell their own health coverage enrollment story. In the near future, the website will publish 17 fact sheets with more information on disability-specific issues and individual state information as well.

More info here.

February 4, 2014 in Consumer Information, Health Care/Long Term Care, Web/Tech | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, November 26, 2013

This week's cool tool: Family Health Portrait

VIA the ACL:
 
Thanksgiving is Family Health History Day: Online Tool Available to Help Organize and Share Useful Info
 
As families gather to celebrate Thanksgiving, Acting Surgeon General Boris Lushniakencourages everyone to spend time talking about their health. “A patient’s family health history is an easy, quick and inexpensive way to get a rough estimate of how strongly a particular disease runs in a family. Knowing your family health history can help your clinician identify screening and treatment options that are personalized for you,” says Lushniak.
 
The Surgeon General’s My Family Health Portrait tool is a free and easy way to record health history. Consumers are able to capture and organize their family members’ information and share it with other family members and health care professionals.  Read more.
 

November 26, 2013 in Health Care/Long Term Care, Web/Tech | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Woof to Wash’ laundry machine lets dogs help people with disabilities

Via Yahoo News:

A man from Leeds, England has invented a dog-controlled washing machine.  The "Woof to Wash" Harrietmachine has a bark-activated "on" switch. A special "paw" button allows the pooch to easily open and close the machine's door.  The inventor, John Middleton of U.K. laundry company JTM, intends for the "Woof to Wash" machine to make laundry an easier task for people living with disabilities by letting them delegate the trickier parts of the job to support dogs who have been trained to load and empty the machines.  "We developed this machine because mainstream products with complex digital controls seldom meet the needs of the disabled user," he said.  The Sheffield charity Support Dogs is training the animals to operate the new machines.

"People who are visually impaired, have manual dexterity problems, autism or learning difficulties can find the complexity of modern day washing machines too much," Middleton told Anorak. "I had been working on a single program washing machine to make things easier, and there was a lot of demand for it."

Read more here

November 26, 2013 in Cognitive Impairment, Health Care/Long Term Care, Retirement, Web/Tech | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, November 14, 2013

Senate Subcommitte on Aging launches anti-fraud hotline, senior-friendly website

Via the Senate Special Committee on Aging:

If you or someone you know suspect you’ve been victim of a scam or fraud aimed at seniors, the U.S. Senate Special Committee on Aging has set up a new toll-free hotline to help.  The hotline was unveiled today to make it easier for senior citizens to report suspected fraud and receive assistance.   It will be staffed by a team of committee investigators weekdays from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST.  The investigators, who have experience with investment scams, identity theft, bogus sweepstakes and lottery schemes, Medicare and Social Security fraud, and a variety of other senior exploitation issues, will directly examine complaints and, if appropriate, refer them to the proper authorities.

Anyone with information about suspected fraud can call the toll-free fraud hotline at 1-855-303-9470, or contact the committee through its website, located at http://www.aging.senate.gov/fraud-hotline.  As chairman and ranking member of the committee, Sens. Bill Nelson (D-FL) and Susan Collins (R-ME) have made consumer protection and fraud prevention a primary focus of the committee’s work.  This year the panel has held hearings examining Jamaican lottery scams, tax-related identity theft, Social Security fraud and payday loans impact on seniors. 


The hotline’s unveiling also coPhoneincides with the committee’s launch of an enhanced senior-friendly website.   The site’s new features include large print, simple navigation and an uncluttered layout that enables seniors to find information more easily and conveniently.  Online visitors can also increase text size, change colors or view a text-only version of the site.  
 
 

November 14, 2013 in Consumer Information, Crimes, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Web/Tech | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, October 8, 2013

And rock some more....

Following up on Becky's post--this is old news, but it is Old News Worth Repeating: the SAFE Minnesota phone/Iphone app       

During their spring 2013 semester in my Elder Justice and Policy Keystone course, students wrote an elder abuse application called “SAFE MN.”  The app is intended for use by law enforcement officials, first responders, mandated reporters, and laypersons who encounter possible abuse or exploitation of a vulnerable adult or older person.  The app provides information about the signs and symptoms of abuse, hotline nSafeumbers, and other resources that will help identify abuse and abusers, allow for reporting and, in appropriate cases, facilitate prosecution.  Keystone students compiled and organized the app’s substantive content, and Chris   , who was a programmer prior to law school and has written a number of apps, wrote the code.

Although the app was intended for use in Minnesota, much of its content is generic.  The app is free, and available for download both from Google Play (Android) and from Apple. 

Desiree Toldt, who will graduate from Mitchell in May 2014, also wrote a paper that serves as a step-by-step guide to others interested in replicating the app in their own jurisdictions.  To obtain a copy of the paper, contact me (use email link in my bio, below).

Kudos to these students for their outstanding work!

More on the Safe MN project.

October 8, 2013 in Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Other, Web/Tech | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Sunday, September 22, 2013

Stanford University's Center on Longevity Offers Design Challenge for Students

September 24 is the kick-off date for a world-wide Design Competition offered by Stanford's Center on Longevity.   The Stanford Report explains the competition is intended to encourage innovation that helps the rising tide of seniors:

"The design contest solicits entries from student teams worldwide and is aimed at finding solutions that help keep people with cognitive impairments independent as long as possible."

The final presentations are scheduled for April 2014 with judging by a panel of academics, industry professionals, nonprofit groups and investors.  The competition offers prizes, including the top prize of $10,000.

Hat tip to Professor Laurel Terry, for news on this interesting challenge.   

September 22, 2013 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Grant Deadlines/Awards, Web/Tech | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, February 22, 2010

Lawyers, Drugs & Money: A Prescription for Antitrust Enforcement in the Pharmaceutical Industry Online Proceedings


In cooperation with The University of San Francisco School of Law and the Rutgers Law Journal, the Legal Scholarship Network (LSN) is pleased to announce the Lawyers, Drugs & Money: A Prescription for Antitrust Enforcement in the Pharmaceutical Industry Online Proceedings. These proceedings are available to all users at no charge and contain abstracts of the meeting's papers with links to the full text within the SSRN eLibrary.

One of the most pressing issues of our time is how to encourage medical innovation while containing the costs of medication. Judges grapple with this challenge in litigation over patent rights and antitrust law. The result is a potent dose of lawyers, drugs and money, the topic of our symposium.

The University of San Francisco School of Law hosted a day-long symposium on Friday, September 25, 2009 in Fromm Hall. The symposium included five panels addressing cutting edge issues relevant to enforcement of the antitrust laws in the pharmaceutical industry. These panels considered topics such as reverse payments (or pay-for-delay settlements), product hopping, standing and preemption, burdens of proof, and class certification in antitrust cases.


You can browse all Lawyers, Drugs & Money: A Prescription for Antitrust Enforcement in the Pharmaceutical Industry Symposium abstracts in the SSRN database by clicking on the following link. The current drafts of the papers are available now and the final versions should be uploaded soon. You may wish to bookmark it in your browser.
View papers: http://www.ssrn.com/link/Lawyers-Drugs-Money.html.

February 22, 2010 in Web/Tech | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, February 3, 2010

New Web-Based Resource for Elders and Elder Law Attorneys

The Administration on Aging, along with a number of non-profit organizations, has created a new legal resource web site that is available to consumers, attorneys and advocates alike.  It is a good starting point for anyone researching the legal rights and benefits of older Amercians.  You can reach the new site by clicking http://www.nlrc.aoa.gov/NLRC/index.aspx:  Called the National Legal Resource Center (NLRC), the new project is a collaboration with:

  • The American Bar Association Commission on Law and Aging
  • The Center for Elder Rights Advocacy
  • The Center for Social Gerontology
  • The National Consumer Law Center
  • The National Senior Citizens Law Center

February 3, 2010 in Web/Tech | Permalink | TrackBack (0)