Tuesday, July 28, 2015

Pop Culture in Your Classroom?

Professor Cynthia Bond at John Marshall Law is doing a survey on how law profs use pop culture in their classrooms. Here is her email providing more info and requesting responses to her survey:

Greetings Law Teacher Colleagues:  

I am working on an article this summer on uses of popular culture in the law school classroom.  I am defining popular culture broadly to include mass culture texts like movies, TV shows, popular music, images which circulate on the internet, etc, and also any current events that you may reference in the classroom which are not purely legal in nature (i.e. not simply a recent court decision). 

To support this article, I am doing a rather unscientific survey to get a sense of what law professors are doing in this area.  If you are a law professor and you use popular culture in your class, I would be most grateful if you could answer this quick, anonymous survey I have put together: 

https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/QH3GBZK 

Thanks in advance for your time and have a wonderful rest of summer!

Cynthia Bond

The John Marshall Law School

Chicago, IL

July 28, 2015 in Current Affairs, Film, Music, Other, Television | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, May 27, 2015

Book Recommendation: Ai-Jen Poo's "The Age of Dignity"

Ai-jen Poo's The Age of DignityIn my preparation for an upcoming talk show on WPSU on "Caring for Mom & Dad," I had the incentive to get to my stack of "must read" books to focus on The Aging of Dignity: Preparing for the Elder Boom in a Changing America, by Ai-Jen Poo (New Press 2015).  What I very much like about this book is the broad lens it brings to aging demographics, focusing not on "burdens" but on "opportunities" to be a more productive, healthy society by dealing realistically with the need for both professional caregivers and family caregivers.  Ai-Jen Poo writes:

Aging at home necessitates home care workers.  Yet the 3 million people currently in the home care workforce cannot meet even the current need, let alone the demand for care that will accompany the elder boom. We will need at least 1.8 million additional home care workers in the next decade. As a result, care giving, specifically home care, is the fastest growing of all occupations in the nation....

 

With some course corrections in our culture and in our institutions, we can have the care infrastructure that will enable us to live our full potential. . . . The moral of this story is that a caring America is entirely within reach.

Not surprisingly, given her inspiring call for action, Ai-Jen Poo was a MacArthur "genius" grant recipient in 2014.  She is one of the commentators on Caring for Mom & Dad, and in Pennsylvania,  she will be part of our panel for WPSU's Conversations Live following the airing of the documentary on Thursday, May 28.  The documentary is at 8 p.m., and the audience can "call-in, e-mail or text-in"beginning at 9 p.m.  More details and links available here about the documentary and schedules here. 

May 27, 2015 in Consumer Information, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Ethical Issues, Grant Deadlines/Awards, Health Care/Long Term Care, Medicaid, Medicare, Statistics, Television | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, May 21, 2015

Documentary on "Moving with Grace"

St. Louis Elder Law Attorney Martha Brown recently recommended a 2013 documentary, writing:  "It is called 'Moving with Grace.'  It is played a lot in St. Louis on the local PBS station as reporter Stone Phillips and his parents lived in St. Louis.  It is a wonderful documentary about the trials and  tribulations of aging parents without the drama of a dysfunctional family."  That is an important message, right?  The challenges associated with "growing older" can hit everyone, even the "best" of families.

American Public Television, that distributes the program, previews it and offers a link to scheduling in your area here, explaining:

Like many baby boomers, former NBC anchor Stone Phillips and his siblings found  themselves caring for their aging parents. Ninety-two-year-old Vic, a World War  II veteran, copes with chronic heart issues, although his mind and memory  remain "as reliable as a Bob Gibson fastball." Grace, his wife of 66 years,  suffers from dementia, which robs the once-gregarious former teacher of her  short-term memory. MOVING WITH GRACE, an intimate documentary Phillips produced  and shot, follows this charming couple as they move out of the family home in  Missouri and adapt to life first in a retirement community and later in an  assisted-living facility. This honest and, at times, poignant story highlights  the common struggles associated with elder care and its consequences.

Thank you, Martha, for sharing this resource!

May 21, 2015 in Cognitive Impairment, Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Ethical Issues, Health Care/Long Term Care, Housing, Television | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, March 10, 2015

New Study Tracks Physical Illness as a Risk Factor for Marital Dissolution in Later Life

Researchers Amelia Karraker, Department of Human Development and Family Studies at Iowa State University and Kenzie Latham, Department of Sociology at Indiana University and Purdue University, recently published "In Sickness and in Health? Physical Illness as a Risk Factor for Marital Dissolution in Later Life" in the Journal of Health and Social Behavior. From the abstract:

"The health consequences of marital dissolution are well known, but little work has examined the impact of health on the risk of marital dissolution. In this study we use a sample of 2,701 marriages from the Health and Retirement Study (1992–2010) to examine the role of serious physical illness onset (i.e., cancer, heart problems, lung disease, and/or stroke) in subsequent marital dissolution due to either divorce or widowhood. We use a series of discrete-time event history models with competing risks to estimate the impact of husband’s and wife’s physical illness onset on risk of divorce and widowhood.

 

We find that only wife’s illness onset is associated with elevated risk of divorce, while either husband’s or wife’s illness onset is associated with elevated risk of widowhood. These findings suggest the importance of health as a determinant of marital dissolution in later life via both biological and gendered social pathways."

The highlighted finding is generating lots of coverage in the popular press.  Thanks to Naomi Cahn, who is also a co-author of the similarly relevant book, Marriage Markets: How Inequality is Remaking the American Family, for sharing the study link.

March 10, 2015 in Books, Current Affairs, Ethical Issues, Health Care/Long Term Care, Television | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, February 6, 2015

Another Movie for Our List

I recently watched the movie, The Judge, starring Robert Downey, Jr. and Robert Duvall, among others.  The premise of the movie is interesting and there's even a good thread about ethics (especially Rule 1.1) running through the movie.  What caught my eye toward the end of the movie is (spoiler alert) the use of compassionate release. Although we may cover this in our classes, I don't know that I've seen that crop up in movies. So, I'm thinking of adding this movie to my list for my elder law class. Any movies you think should be on the list?

February 6, 2015 in Crimes, Other, Television | Permalink | Comments (2) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, February 11, 2014

Hollywood star Shirley Temple dies

Via the BBC:

ALeqM5jCss2Qnob2rCkxkmWNb-8Q_KaZEgFormer Hollywood child star Shirley Temple has died at the age of 85.  With her adorable charm and blonde curls, she was one of the most popular stars of the 1930s, in hit movies like Bright Eyes and Stand Up and Cheer.  After retiring from films in 1950 at the age of 21, Temple returned to the spotlight as a politician and diplomat.  She died on Monday at home in Woodside, California, from natural causes. "She was surrounded by her family and caregivers," a statement said.  Born in 1928, Temple soon became a major star after getting her first film role at the age of three.

Read more here.

February 11, 2014 in Other, Television | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, September 5, 2013

Book Report: The End of Your Life Book Club

Over the Labor Day weekend, I happened to catch a great public radio interview with author Will Schwable about the book inspired by his two-year conversation with his mother about books.  The End of Your Life Book Club describes how their mutual love of reading provided opportunities for the two to discuss life and death, both directly and indirectly.  Why was this important? The conversations took place while his mother was receiving chemotherapy for pancreatic cancer.  He said they never had "the big talk" you might expect when confronted with mortality -- rather, they had dozens and dozens of small talks. 

It made me think about conversations with my own family members.  We live far apart and while I try to make it home frequently (at this point, I'm the only family member who flies), I know I don't make it home often enough.  But we talk a lot on the phone and I think we have also developed ways of speaking directly and indirectly about the present and the future.  Lately, with my parents that has often been through funny conversations about Dancing with the Stars.  (Thank goodness for on-demand television access, since I rarely catch the show on first airing.)  We talk about who is "doing well for their age" or who isn't. We suggest who we would like to see on the show (Julie Andrews?), and who makes us cringe (sorry, Cloris Leachman).  It has become shorthand for talking about memory, mobility, capacity, and our own aches and pains. 

What works for your family?  Or are you part of a (rare?) family who talks about such topics directly?  (Comments open below)

September 5, 2013 in Books, Current Affairs, Music, Television | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)