Thursday, December 7, 2017

Planning for Workshop on Physician-Aided Death

The National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine released information about planning for a workshop Physician-Assisted Death: Scanning the Landscape and Potential Approaches - A Workshop

The 2014 case of Brittany Maynard, a 29-year old woman suffering from terminal brain cancer who made public her desire to have an option to end her life through medication, brought to the forefront of the public eye the age-old question of whether terminally ill patients should have access to a physician's assistance to hasten death. To gain the option, Ms. Maynard relocated from California to Oregon, where a "death with dignity" law has been in effect for nearly 20 years. More recently, five jurisdictions (California, Colorado, District of Columbia, Vermont, and Washington) have legalized physician-assisted death, and physician-assisted death is also legal in one state (Montana) by virtue of a ruling of that state's Supreme Court. The question of whether and under what circumstances terminally ill patients can access life-ending medications with the aid of a physician is receiving increasing attention as a matter of public opinion and of public policy. Ethicists, clinicians, patients and their families debate whether physician-assisted death ought to be a legal option for patients. While public opinion is divided, and public policy debates include moral, ethical, and policy considerations, a demand for physician-assisted death still persists among some patients, and the inconsistent legal terrain leaves a number of questions and challenges for health care providers to navigate when presented with these patients. The Board on Health Sciences Policy of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine will convene an ad hoc committee to plan a workshop that will explore current practices and challenges associated with physician-assisted death, and highlight potential approaches for addressing those challenges.

Stay tuned for more info.

December 7, 2017 in Advance Directives/End-of-Life, Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Health Care/Long Term Care, Programs/CLEs, State Statutes/Regulations | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, November 27, 2017

Reframing Aging Video

A Frameworks Institute initiative, Reframing Aging, now includes a free video on reframing aging and ageism. The video can be ordered here.  (Although free, you still need to enter your contact information and then receive an email with login info to start the course.  The course info explains that the "lecture series, [provides] a guided tour of how to use new, evidence-based framing strategies to communicate more powerfully about aging as a social policy issue."  The sponsors of the lecture series are Grantmakers in Aging and the Leaders of Aging Organizations. Topics include “What's in a Name?,” “The Swamp of Cultural Models,” “Rethinking Narrative,” “Stories to Stop Telling,” “Embracing the Dynamic” and “Confronting Injustice.

November 27, 2017 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Discrimination, Film, Programs/CLEs, Web/Tech | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, November 15, 2017

Palliative Care and Serious Illnesses

The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine released a new report Models and Strategies to Integrate Palliative Care Principles into Care for People with Serious Illness: Proceedings of a Workshop The website explains the purpose of the workshop

The Roundtable on Quality Care for People with Serious Illness hosted a full-day workshop on April 27, 2017 to explore Models and Strategies to Integrate Palliative Care Principles into Care for People with Serious Illness. The workshop aimed to highlight innovative models of community-based care for people of all ages facing serious illness. The workshop featured invited presentations and panel discussions exploring community-based palliative care from a population health management perspective as well as a health system perspective; pediatric palliative care, concurrent care, and palliative care within the context of a multispecialty accountable care organization; potential policy levers, as well as the challenges and opportunities to scale and spread successful palliative care models and programs. The workshop rapporteurs have prepared this proceedings as a factual summation of the workshop presentations and discussions.

Here is an excerpt from the introduction

Remarkable developments in health promotion and disease treatment and prevention have led to significant improvements in life expectancy throughout the 20th century and into the present. Concurrent with those improvements has been the reality that most Americans will experience a substantial period of time living with serious illness; an estimated 45 million Americans currently are living with one or more chronic conditions (IOM, 2015; NASEM, 2016). Those living with serious illness can be found across the age spectrum and in a broad range of care settings, from pre-birth to geriatric care. Recognizing the need to thoughtfully consider and address the challenges and opportunities to improve care for people of all ages and all stages of a serious illness, the Roundtable on Quality Care for People with Serious Illness serves to convene stakeholders from government, academia, industry, professional associations, nonprofit advocacy organizations, and philanthropies. Inspired by and expanding on the work of the 2014 Institute of Medicine consensus study report Dying in America: Improving Quality and Honoring Individual Preferences Near the End of Life (IOM, 2015),2 the Roundtable aims to foster ongoing dialogue about critical policy and research issues to accelerate and sustain progress in care for people of all ages experiencing serious illness.

The publication can be read online here or downloaded for free as a pdf.  It can also be purchased as a paperback for $45. 

 

 

 

November 15, 2017 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Federal Statutes/Regulations, Health Care/Long Term Care, Programs/CLEs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, November 1, 2017

More From the 19th Annual Stetson Special Needs Trust Conference

I wanted to use this post to highlight some other things that I learned by visiting with folks at the conference.  Fellow Floridian Nick Burton handed me a business card and a lapel pin for Florida Adaptive Sports. "Florida Adaptive Sports [is] funded by AGED, Inc. as a part of its mission to give back to the community in the form of providing resources, opportunities and awareness for Florida’s disabled community."  I stopped by to chat with the folks from  Stephen's Place  which provides housing for individuals with special needs, but not quite the same as a CCRC since no SNF living is provided (Stephen's Place, an adult care home, is located on the west coast and offers independent and assisted living in a more urban setting) but they do work with families when a resident needs that level of care.

I was chatting as well with the folks from Mobility Support Systems,  another exhibitor, about the issues in renting a wheelchair accessible van when flying into an airport.  If someone is visiting mom who is in a wheelchair and wants to take mom out for dinner or shopping, what are the options? I thought renting a wheelchair van might be a good solution, but I'm not sure whether the typical rental car companies offer that vehicle.  The folks at the booth told me they keep a list for the various airports. It's so helpful to have that info available when making arrangements for the family visit!

I was also pleased to chat with a number of exhibitors who offer a variety of services designed to keep folks independent, and several offer fiduciary-type services. These are just some examples of learning things both inside and outside the classroom.  For more info about our conference, click here.

November 1, 2017 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Health Care/Long Term Care, Housing, Programs/CLEs | Permalink

LeadingAge: Hot Topics for Attorneys Who Advise Clients in Senior Housing and Service Industries

LeadingAge 2017 Hot Topics  for Lawyers Advising in Senior LivingThis week, the last session I was able to attend at LeadingAge's annual meeting was a panel talk on "Legal Perspectives from In-House Counsel."  As expected, some of the time was spent on questions about "billing" by outside law firms, whether hourly, flat-fee or "value" billing was preferred by the corporate clients.  

But the panelists, including Jodi Hirsch, Vice President and General Counsel for Lifespace Communities with headquarters in Des Moines, Iowa; Ken Young, Executive VP and General Counsel for United Church Homes, headquartered in Ohio; and "outhouse" counsel Aric Martin, managing partner at the Cleveland, Ohio law firm of Rolf, Goffman, Martin & Long, offered a Jeopardy-style screen, with a wide array of legal issues they have encountered in their positions.  I'm sorry I did not have time to stay longer after the program, before heading to the airport.  They were very clear and interesting speakers, with healthy senses of humor.

The topics included responding to government investigations and litigation; vetting compliance and ethics programs to reduce the likelihood of investigations or litigation; cybersecurity (including the need for encryption of lap tops and cell phones which inevitably go missing); mergers and acquisitions; contract and vendor management; labor and employment; social media policies; automated external defibrillators (AEDs); residency agreements; attorney-client privilege; social accountability and benevolent care (LeadingAge members are nonprofit operators); ACO/Managed Care issues; Fair Housing rules that affect admissions, transfers, dining, rooms and "assistance animals"; tax exemption issues (including property and sale tax exemptions); medical and recreational marijuana; governance issues (including residents on board of directors); and entertainment licensing.

Whew!  Wouldn't this be a great list to offer law students thinking about their own career opportunities in law, to help them see the range of topics that can come up in this intersection of health care and housing?  The law firm's representative on the panel has more than 20 lawyers in the firm who work solely on senior housing market legal issues.

On that last issue, entertainment licensing, I was chatting after the program with a non-lawyer administrator of a nursing and rehab center in New York, who had asked the panel about whether nonprofits "have" to pay licensing fees when they play music and movies for residents.   The panelists did not have time to go into detail, but they said their own clients have decided it was often wisest to "pay to play" for movies and videos.  Copyright rules and the growing efforts to ensure payments are the reasons.  

The administrator and I chatted more, and she said her business has been bombarded lately by letters from various sources seeking to "help" her company obtain licenses, but she wanted to know more about why.  For the most part, the exceptions to licensing requirements depend on the fairly broad definition of "public" performances, and not on whether the provider is for-profit or nonprofit.  

It turns out that LeadingAge, along with other leading industry associations, negotiated a comprehensive licensing agreement for showing movies and videos in "Senior Living and  Health Care Communities" in 2016.  Details, including discussion of copyright coverage issues for entertainment in various kinds of care settings, are here.   

November 1, 2017 in Current Affairs, Estates and Trusts, Ethical Issues, Federal Cases, Federal Statutes/Regulations, Health Care/Long Term Care, Housing, Legal Practice/Practice Management, Medicaid, Medicare, Programs/CLEs, Property Management, State Cases, State Statutes/Regulations | Permalink | Comments (0)

"America Freed From Ageism" - a LeadingAge Goal

LeadingAge President and CEO Katie Smith Sloan spoke at the Sunday morning (10/29/17) session of NACCRA's meetings in New Orleans.  Having taken the reins of LeadingAge after Larry Mannix, it's long time leader who retired in 2015, Katie seems to be settling in well.  She identified several themes for LeadinAge's immediate future, including: 

  • Advocating for an "America Freed From Ageism." Katie observing that this negative bias stands in the way of policy, philanthropy, and hiring in all of the nonprofit senior living and senior service sectors.
  • Making LeadingAge "the" trusted voice for aging.  She emphasized this goal is all about building relationships and she pointed to several recent high level policy meetings in DC where LeadingAge was invited as a key voice for older adults or the industry.
  • Katie also reported that LeadingAge received an outpouring of donations for its disaster relief fund, with over 600 donations.  So far the total is more than a half million dollars.  She gave examples of how these donations were already helping nonprofit providers affected by the recent hurricanes and fires, including helping staff members who had lost their homes to find housing and helping 3 affordable senior housing communities maximize insurance relief by using donations to pay-down deductibles. 

In the Q and A with NaCCRA members, Katie said that LeadingAge and NaCCRA can and should work together to identify common topics for joint efforts, especially on public policy advocacy.  

I'm aware that some NaCCRA members are discouraged (or perhaps frustrated is a better word) by a perception that LeadingAge tends to ignore policy points urged by NaCCRA, while still expecting NaCCRA members to support LeadingAge's positions.  Time will tell whether NaCCRA was being too tactful in raising this partnership project concern. 

November 1, 2017 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Ethical Issues, Health Care/Long Term Care, Housing, Programs/CLEs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, October 22, 2017

Southeastern Association of Law Schools Annual Conference Proposals

The Southeastern Association of Law Schools (SEALS) has opened their call for proposals for their 2018 annual conference.  If you teach T&E, Elder Law or related courses and are interested, here is some info about proposals for those tracks written by one of the organizers, Deborah Gordon:

We are hoping to encourage more trusts and estates programming at the Southeastern Association of Law Schools conference, which will be held from August 6-12 in Ft. Lauderdale.  We will be proposing two discussion groups, described below, one which focuses on pedagogy and one on scholarship; please let us know if you would like to participate.

In addition, please feel free to propose a panel or discussion group yourself; here is the submission information, http://www.sealslawschools.org/submissions/.

Thank you!  If you have any questions and would like to participate, then please contact Naomi Cahn, ncahn@law.gwu.edu/, and Deborah Gordon, dsg45@drexel.edu.

PROPOSED DISCUSSION GROUPS Both pedagogy and scholarship within trusts and estates are moving beyond traditional core topics.  We are proposing two plenary discussion groups that explore how pedagogy and scholarship are expanding the ways of teaching and studying trusts and estates and related doctrines. One group will address innovations in teaching, including both skills and doctrine, and teaching about topics that overlap with other areas of the  law, such as Elder Law, Family Law, Property, and Professional Responsibility; the second group will explore new scholarship.

October 22, 2017 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Estates and Trusts, Other, Programs/CLEs | Permalink

Thursday, October 12, 2017

Aging, Law & Society Collaborative Research Network Call for Papers Due Oct. 16

The next meeting of the Aging, Law & Society Collaborative Research Network is set for June 7-10, 2018 in Toronto as part of the Law & Society Annual meeting.  Here's the info from the announcement: 

The Aging, Law, and Society Collaborative Research Network (CRN) invites scholars to participate in a multi-event workshop sponsored by the CRN as part of the Law and Society Association’s 2018 Annual Meeting. The Aging, Law & Society CRN brings together scholars from across disciplines to share research and ideas about the relationship between law and aging, including how the law responds the needs of persons as they age and how law shapes the aging experience. This year’s workshop will feature themed panels, roundtable discussions, and rapid fire presentations in which participants can share new ideas and research projects.

The CRN encourages paper proposals on a broad range of issues related to law and aging. However, we especially encourage proposals on the following topics:

• Creative, inter-disciplinary and empirical methodologies for studying law and aging;

• Intergenerational relationships, ageism, and intergenerational justice;

• Theoretical frameworks for understanding the law as it relates to older adults;

• Legal responses to dementia;

• Long-term care;

• Elder abuse and neglect;

• Human rights of older adults; and

• Identity and intersectionality in older age.

In addition to paper proposals, we also welcome:

• Volunteers to serve as panel discussants and as commentators on works-in-progress.

• Ideas and proposals for themed panels, round-tables, or a session around a new book.

Proposals are due October 16 (get busy writing). The form for submission is available here http://www.lawandsociety.org/Toronto2018/2018-guidelines.html).  and should be sent by email to Professor Nina Kohn nakohn@law.syr.edu & Dr. Issi Doron, idoron@univ.haifa.ac.il along with a 1000 word abstract and your contact info.

 

 

October 12, 2017 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, International, Other, Programs/CLEs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, October 3, 2017

Canadian Elder Law Conference - November 2-3, 2017

The Canadian Elder Law Conference  is again hosting a two-day program on the law and policy issues impacting older adults, in Vancouver, British Columbia on November 2-3, 2017.

After taking this course, you will:

  • be better able to identify and address the legal issues that impact your older client
  • be familiar with recent trends, developments, and research in the law with respect to elder law topics such as medical assistance in dying, mental capacity, undue influence, independent legal advice, financial abuse, and adult protection
  • better understand the legal, practical, and ethical issues in relation to older clients with mental capacity and self-neglect issues

The program this year will include a debate on "video surveillance in long-term care," a panel on medically assisted death and advance consent, and a discussion of undue influence and independent legal advice.

For more, see  Coming of Age: Elder Law in Canada and Its Future, including registration information.

October 3, 2017 in Advance Directives/End-of-Life, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Ethical Issues, Programs/CLEs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Call for Papers: Seton Hall Law's 2d Annual Health Law Works-In-Progress Retreat on 2/9/18

We just received the good news that Seton Hall Law School's Center for Health and Pharmaceutical Law & Policy will hold a second (now second annual!) "Regional Health Law Works-in Progress Retreat" in early 2018.  The purpose of the retreat is to give area health law scholars an opportunity to share their work and exchange ideas in a friendly, informal setting.  The retreat is open to anyone with an academic appointment in health law (including professors, fellows, and visitors) in any institution of higher education in the Northeast area (broadly defined to include Washington D.C. and all points north).

The retreat will take place on February 9, 2018 at Seton Hall Law in Newark, New Jersey, offering an opportunity for in-depth discussion of approximately 5-6 draft papers.  Professor Carl Coleman  explains:  "For each paper, a commentator will provide a 10-15 minute overview, as well as his or her reactions.  The author will then have 5 minutes to respond, after which the floor will be opened for a general discussion among all retreat participants."

For those interested in participating they should submit a preliminary draft or a detailed abstract to Professor Coleman at carl.coleman@shu.edu by November 17, 2017.  So, plan ahead!  Professor Coleman says that those with submissions accepted for presentation will be notified by December 15. Final drafts are due by January 19, 2018.

By the way, while looking at the interesting materials on Seton Hall Law School's website, I noticed an timely program on "Consumer Financial Protection in Health Care," on the evening of Tuesday, October 24, 2017.  Seton Hall invites interested persons to join them "for a discussion about the growing body of financial protections under federal and state law for health care consumers and how we can work to protect all health care consumers from medical-billing abuses."  

 

September 20, 2017 in Consumer Information, Health Care/Long Term Care, Programs/CLEs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, September 19, 2017

Elder Homicides Webinar

The DOJ's elder justice initiative is offering a free webinar on Monday September 25, 2017 at 2 p.m. edt on The Forgotten Victims: Elder Homicides. Here is a description about the webinar

Elder homicides often go undetected, and investigating them requires a multi-pronged approach. In this webinar, learn about the victims, the offenders, and the crime scenes. How does the medical examiner’s information contribute to solving these high-profile, difficult cases? Join the webinar to discover how research has advanced the successful investigations of these crimes. 

To register for the webinar, click here

September 19, 2017 in Consumer Information, Crimes, Current Affairs, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Programs/CLEs, State Cases, Webinars | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, September 6, 2017

Medicaid 101 Webinar

The National Center on Law & Elder Rights  has announced an upcoming free webinar on Medicaid 101.

Here is the info about the webinar

Understanding Medicaid is a key to understanding the health and long-term care delivery system for older adults. Every year, over 6 million older Americans rely on Medicaid every year to pay for necessary health services. Over two-thirds of all older adults who receive long-term care at home or in a nursing facility, participate in the Medicaid program.

This free webinar, Legal Basics: Medicaid 101, will provide participants with a basic primer on the Medicaid program. It will explain the formation of Medicaid, Medicaid funding, key Medicaid protections, and Medicaid’s role in paying for health and long-term care for older adults.

The webinar is set for September 12, 2017 at 2:00 p.m. edt. To register, click here.

September 6, 2017 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Federal Statutes/Regulations, Health Care/Long Term Care, Medicaid, Programs/CLEs, Webinars | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, September 5, 2017

Dual Eligibles and Medicare Coordination of Benefits

The National Center of Law & Elder Rights has announced an upcoming free webinar on Managed Care for Dual Eligibles and Medicare Coordination Programs on September 20, 2017 at 2:00 p.m. edt.  Here's a description of the webinar

Dual eligible individuals, those with both Medicare and Medicaid coverage, represent the most medically needy and costly population for both Medicare and Medicaid. In an effort to improve health outcomes and reduce healthcare spending, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has been testing  financial alignment demonstrations in thirteen states to better coordinate and integrate care for dual eligibles.

What has been learned from these demonstrations so far? What are the take-aways for states that did not participate? This webinar will provide an update on these dual eligible demonstrations and review early evaluations of the programs. The webinar will also cover other recent efforts by CMS to address issues unique to dual eligible including issues around access to durable medical equipment.

Following the training, the audience will have a better understanding of the two models being tested in the demonstration, the fully capitated model and the managed fee-for-service model. They will also know about challenges and innovations during the almost four years since the demonstrations were launched and what further evaluation is being planned.

This is an advanced webinar. Legal service attorneys and aging and disability network professionals who work with dual eligibles are encouraged to attend.

Click here to register.

September 5, 2017 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Health Care/Long Term Care, Medicaid, Medicare, Programs/CLEs, Webinars | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, August 22, 2017

DOJ Webinar Financial Exploitation in the Context of Guardianships and Other Legal Arrangements

Mark your calendars for September 6, 2017 at 2:00 p.m. edt. DOJ's Elder Justice Initiative will be hosting another in its series of webinars on elder abuse.  More information and registration for Financial Exploitation in the Context of Guardianships and Other Legal Arrangements will be available soon.

Update 8/28/2017: registration is now open!

August 22, 2017 in Cognitive Impairment, Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Programs/CLEs, State Statutes/Regulations, Webinars | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, August 9, 2017

2018 Medicine-Law Continuing Ed Program: Save the Date

The Florida State U. Center for Innovative Collaboration in Medicine & Law  along with the Florida Bioethics Network will hold the annual Medicine-Law Conference on Monday, January 22, 2018 at the Florida State University Alumni Center in Tallahassee.  The 2018 conference theme is Health Professional/Attorney Collaboration on Behalf of Patients and Clients.  More info will be available from the Center for Innovative Collaboration in Medicine & Law.

August 9, 2017 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Health Care/Long Term Care, Programs/CLEs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, August 6, 2017

Free Webinar: In-kind Support & Maintenance

Mark your calendars for August 16, 2017 at 2:00 p.m. edt for a free webinar from Justice in Aging on In-Kind Support & Maintenance (ISM).  Here's a description of the webinar:

Why do many clients receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits only receive $490 each month instead of $735, and what can we do about it?  In many cases, the reason is “in-kind support and maintenance” (ISM). A person who receives shelter and food from a friend or family member they live with is receiving in-kind support and maintenance. The Social Security Administration (SSA) counts that support as income and lowers their benefit. The ISM rule is unique to the SSI program, and causes a lot of confusion for recipients, advocates, and SSA. This free webinar, In-Kind Support and Maintenance, will explore the ins and outs of ISM, provide examples of how the rule works, and offer strategies for dealing with the rule. As SSI is a means-tested program, applicants and recipients must meet several financial eligibility criteria on an ongoing basis. The income and resources rules, including “in-kind support and maintenance,” are particularly complicated. These rules can cause significant hardship for low-income people trying to survive on SSI. Giving advocates the tools to successfully navigate the rules on behalf of their clients can make a big difference. The recipient in the example above could have an additional $245 per month for necessities like health care expenses, household expenses, transportation, and other basic needs.

To register for this webinar, click here.

August 6, 2017 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Federal Statutes/Regulations, Programs/CLEs, Social Security, Webinars | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, August 5, 2017

Free Webinar: Bankruptcy & Elders

Justice in Aging is offering a free webinar on Tuesday August 8, 2017 at 2:00 p.m. edt on Bankruptcy Protections for Older Consumers. Here's the description of the webinar:

An increasing number of older consumers are struggling with unmanageable debt. Debt collectors are using aggressive tactics to pursue older adults with limited resources, making it critically important for legal services attorneys to understand protections that may help their clients. Bankruptcy may help older consumers eliminate debt and preserve income needed to pay rent, buy food, and keep the lights on.   This free webinar, Bankruptcy Protections for Older Consumers, outlines the issues facing older consumers and offers strategies to address the challenges. This session will highlight the various protections available and alternatives to filing for bankruptcy.

Click here to register for this webinar.

August 5, 2017 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Federal Statutes/Regulations, Programs/CLEs, Webinars | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, July 26, 2017

Intervention as Mitigation of Elder Mistreatment?

The National Adult Protective Services Association (NAPSA) and the National Council on Crime and Delinquency announce a free upcoming webinar, The Abuse Intervention Model: A Pragmatic Approach to Intervention for Elder Mistreatment. Set for August 9, 2017 at 2 p.m. edt, the "webinar will present the Abuse Intervention Model (AIM), which is a simple, coherent framework of known risk factors of the victim, perpetrator, and environment that applies to all types of abuse. Dr. Laura Mosqueda will discuss the details of the AIM, and present case studies on how the AIM can be applied to APS work."  Click here to register.  To read more about the intervention model, click here.

July 26, 2017 in Consumer Information, Crimes, Current Affairs, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Programs/CLEs, Webinars | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, July 23, 2017

Central States Law School Association (CSLSA) Annual Scholarship Conference

I received a notice about the upcoming CSLSA annual conference. Here's the info:

Registration is now open for the Central States Law Schools Association 2017 Scholarship Conference, which will be held on Friday, October 6 and Saturday, October 7 at Southern Illinois University School of Law in Carbondale, Illinois. We invite law faculty from across the country to submit proposals to present papers or works in progress. CSLSA is an organization of law schools dedicated to providing a forum for conversation and collaboration among law school academics. The CSLSA Annual Conference is an opportunity for legal scholars, especially more junior scholars, to present working papers or finished articles on any law-related topic in a relaxed and supportive setting where junior and senior scholars from various disciplines are available to comment. More mature scholars have an opportunity to test new ideas in a less formal setting than is generally available for their work. Scholars from member and nonmember schools are invited to attend.  Please click here to register. The deadline for registration is September 2, 2017.   Hotel rooms are now available for pre-booking.  The conference hotel is the Holiday Inn Conference Center in Carbondale.  To reserve a room, call 618-549-2600 and ask for the SIU School of Law rate ($109/night) or book online and use block code SOL.  SIU School of Law will provide shuttle service to and from the Holiday Inn & Conference Center for conference events.  Other hotel options (without shuttle service) are listed on our website.  Please note that conference participants are responsible for all of their own travel expenses including hotel accommodations. For more information about CSLSA and the 2017 Annual Conference please subscribe to our blog.

July 23, 2017 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Programs/CLEs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Central States Law School Association (CSLSA) Annual Scholarship Conference

I received a notice about the upcoming CSLSA annual conference. Here's the info

Registration is now open for the Central States Law Schools Association 2017 Scholarship Conference, which will be held on Friday, October 6 and Saturday, October 7 at Southern Illinois University School of Law in Carbondale, Illinois. We invite law faculty from across the country to submit proposals to present papers or works in progress. CSLSA is an organization of law schools dedicated to providing a forum for conversation and collaboration among law school academics. The CSLSA Annual Conference is an opportunity for legal scholars, especially more junior scholars, to present working papers or finished articles on any law-related topic in a relaxed and supportive setting where junior and senior scholars from various disciplines are available to comment. More mature scholars have an opportunity to test new ideas in a less formal setting than is generally available for their work. Scholars from member and nonmember schools are invited to attend.  Please click here to register. The deadline for registration is September 2, 2017.   Hotel rooms are now available for pre-booking.  The conference hotel is the Holiday Inn Conference Center in Carbondale.  To reserve a room, call 618-549-2600 and ask for the SIU School of Law rate ($109/night) or book online and use block code SOL.  SIU School of Law will provide shuttle service to and from the Holiday Inn & Conference Center for conference events.  Other hotel options (without shuttle service) are listed on our website.  Please note that conference participants are responsible for all of their own travel expenses including hotel accommodations. For more information about CSLSA and the 2017 Annual Conference please subscribe to our blog.

July 23, 2017 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Programs/CLEs | Permalink | Comments (0)