Saturday, June 13, 2015

Forty-nine years ago...

The New York Times' "On this Day" squib reminded us today: 

"On June 13, 1966, the Supreme Court issued its landmark Miranda vs. Arizona decision, ruling that criminal suspects must be informed of their constitutional rights prior to questioning by police."

That triggered memories, as the day the landmark decision first became known in Arizona, the father of one of my friends offered everyone in the neighborhood a glass of champagne, even us kids.  At the time I did not fully appreciate the reason.  It was only years later that I put it together that the celebrant was John P. Flynn, the lawyer who successfully argued the Miranda case before the U.S. Supreme Court.

Even more years later, in the 2000 Supreme Court decision of Dickerson v. U.S., another man from that same Phoenix, Arizona neighborhood would confirm the importance of "Miranda warnings" as an accepted mainstay of protection for individuals suspected of crimes.  Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist did not share the legal or political philosophies that generated the original ruling, but he could be persuaded to respect the role of stare decisis. I have often been bemused by the fact that John Flynn, a bold advocate and life-long Democrat,  had once celebrated his biggest victory with the children of the neighborhood, including the children of a future Supreme Court Justice, well known for his conservatism.  Phoenix, especially the legal community, was a very small town in those days.

My trip down memory lane took me to a colorful account of John P. Flynn's life.  It is the story of a creative and talented lawyer, from an era much more tolerant of personal flaws. Read "Remembering John Flynn" by his one-time law partner Tom Galbraith.

June 13, 2015 in Crimes, Ethical Issues, Federal Cases, Other | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, June 10, 2015

White House Conference on Aging July 13, 2015

Mark your calendars. The date for the WHCOA has been set for July 13, 2015. The event is going to be webcast live.  Folks are encouraged to watch it and even tweet questions for the panelists at the conference. For more ideas and information, click here.

June 10, 2015 in Current Affairs, Health Care/Long Term Care, Housing, Other, Programs/CLEs, Retirement, Webinars | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, June 8, 2015

Living a Longer, Fulfilling Life?

The Wall Street Journal ran an interesting article on May 31 about longevity and how to have a fulfilling life with those extra years of living.   How to Make the Most of Longer Lives focuses not just on planning financially for living longer, but questions what to do with those added years to be sure one has a  meaningful life. The author suggests "[w]e need to marshal imagination and ingenuity to devise new strategies for enhancing the whole range of experiences in later life, including education, faith, housing, work, finance and community" and then offers six suggestions to increase the quality of life: (1) give a new name to this period of life; (2) smooth the way to transition into this part of life (or as the author explains it retirement and then "un-retirement" is "a do-it-yourself process. It’s time to help make this post-midlife passage more efficient and suited to preparing individuals emotionally and spiritually for what lies ahead."); (3) education specifically for the second half of life (4) financial security; (5) promote multi-generational housing; (6) create a model where inventors brainstorm new ideas for this part of life.

The author concludes with reference to the upcoming White House Conference on Aging and the challenges that await all of us with aging.

June 8, 2015 in Current Affairs, Other, Retirement | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, May 26, 2015

How Much Money Will You Have at the End of Your Life?

The Employee Benefits Research Institute (EBRI) published a note in April, 2015 that looked at the question of how much money people have at the end of their lives.  A Look At the End-of-Life Financial Situation in America. Here is what the study examined

This report takes a comprehensive look at the financial situation of older Americans at the end of their lives. In particular, it documents the percentage of households with a member who recently died with very few assets (total assets as well as non-housing assets). It also documents income, debt, home-ownership rates, net home equity and the share of their income coming from Social Security benefits for those households.

This report is useful as part of the work by EBRI in looking at retirement security and whether people will have sufficient funds to last the rest of their lives.  Here are some bullets from the conclusion:

  • For those who died at ages 85 or above, 20.6 percent had no non-housing assets and 12.2 percent had no assets left.
  • Among singles who died at or above age 85, 24.6 percent had no non-housing assets left and 16.7 percent had no assets left.
  • Those who died at earlier ages were generally worse off financially: 29.8 percent of households that lost a member between ages 50 and 64 had no assets left. 
  • People who died earlier also had significantly lower household income than households with all surviving members. 
  • Among singles who died at ages 85 or above, 9.1 percent had outstanding debt (other than mortgage debt) and the average debt amount was $6,368. 
  • The average net equity left in their primary residence for those who died at ages 85 or above was $141,147 and $83,471 for couple and single households, respectively.

May 26, 2015 in Other, Retirement | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, April 24, 2015

Got an Idea? Maybe You Are an Inventor!

Are you an inventor?  Ever have a good idea for an invention?  There is a renaissance of sorts in American ingenuity with an increasing number of older Americans becoming inventors.  The NY Times ran a story about older inventors on April 17, 2015. More Older Adults Are Becoming Inventors notes this renaissance

Whether as volunteers or for profit, older inventors ... are riding a rising tide of American innovation. They are teaming up, joining inventors clubs and getting their products into the marketplace. And older inventors bring valuable skills to their work, many experts say, like worldly wisdom and problem-solving abilities that can give them an advantage over younger inventors.

According to the article, the Baby Boomers are at least part of the catalysts for this surge of older inventors, as the boomers look for products to assist them as they get older. According to one expert quoted in the article, older inventors may have an edge over younger ones, since "[a]n aging brain can see patterns better.”  Before you get out the proverbial drawing board, the article notes that inventions don't necessarily lead to wealth with less than 5% of inventions making money, not to mention the prototype and startup costs

April 24, 2015 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Other | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, April 22, 2015

Fundamentals of SNT Administration webinar-it's not too late to register

Stetson College of Law and the Center for Excellence in Elder Law at Stetson Law (full disclosure, I'm hosting this webinar) is offering the annual Fundamentals webinar on Friday April 24, 2015 from 1-5 p.m..  This half-day webinar features presentations by Stu Zimring, Mary Alice Jackson and Robert Fleming.  More information, the schedule and registration information are available here.

April 22, 2015 in Estates and Trusts, Other, Programs/CLEs | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, March 17, 2015

Promises of Confidentiality in Academic Research? Potential Lessons from The Belfast Project

Today is St. Patrick's Day, celebrated with greater fervor in many U.S. communities than it is in Ireland.  Indeed, as I learned during my 2010 sabbatical in Northern Ireland, while Belfast is home to a variety of dramatic "historical" parades and holidays, events on St. Patrick's Day are low key and mostly for children.  Signs of the Times in Belfast Candidate Gerry Adams

In the March 16 issue of The New Yorker magazine, writer (and Yale-educated lawyer) Patrick Radden Keefe digs into the history of Northern Ireland, looking at the late stages of the Troubles.  He examines possible roles played by Gerry Adams as an acknowledged leader of political party Sinn Fein versus his long-denied authority for certain violent actions of the IRA. 

Keefe provides a comprehensive analysis of the events before and after the Good Friday Agreement of 1998, offering details that are devastating if true about how violence was often at its most problematic when perpetrated within the ranks of extreme republican and loyalist factions. Central to the history is the lingering question of who was responsible for the December 1972 abduction and execution of Jean McConville, the widowed mother of 10 children, suspected of informing against the IRA.

In the article, Gerry Adams comes across as determined to be both charismatic and enigmatic, as hero and anti-hero, as deeply devoted to a "United Ireland," while also oddly enamored with trivial self-promotion. I came away from the article thinking it was a good reminder of how dangerous it can be -- in any country -- to believe absolutely in any single leader.

The article also presents ethical questions associated with efforts to document the Troubles through oral histories recorded under the auspices of Boston College:

Continue reading

March 17, 2015 in Books, Ethical Issues, International, Other | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, February 27, 2015

Indiana Law Review Symposium: State Governments & Aging Populations

Check out  Volume 48, Issue 1 of the Indiana Law Review which contains articles from the  2013 Program on Law & State Government Fellowship Symposium:  State Governments Face the Realities of Aging Populations. Three articles are included from the symposium, all of which are available on-line. The articles include Introduction:  Governing Choices in the Face of a Generational Storm, Aging Populations and Physician Aid in Dying:  The Evolution of State Government Policy, and What the Future of Aging Means to All of Us:  An Era of Possibilities.

February 27, 2015 in Advance Directives/End-of-Life, Health Care/Long Term Care, Housing, Other, Programs/CLEs | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, February 6, 2015

Another Movie for Our List

I recently watched the movie, The Judge, starring Robert Downey, Jr. and Robert Duvall, among others.  The premise of the movie is interesting and there's even a good thread about ethics (especially Rule 1.1) running through the movie.  What caught my eye toward the end of the movie is (spoiler alert) the use of compassionate release. Although we may cover this in our classes, I don't know that I've seen that crop up in movies. So, I'm thinking of adding this movie to my list for my elder law class. Any movies you think should be on the list?

February 6, 2015 in Crimes, Other, Television | Permalink | Comments (2) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, January 14, 2015

Follow the happenings with the White House Conference on Aging 2015

Directly from the White House:

The first White House Conference on Aging (WHCoA) was held in 1961, with subsequent conferences in 1971, 1981, 1995, and 2005. These conferences have been viewed as catalysts for development of aging policy over the past 50 years. The conferences generated ideas and momentum prompting the establishment of and/or key improvements in many of the programs that represent America’s commitment to older Americans including: Medicare, Medicaid, Social Security, and the Older Americans Act.

Historic photo: Overarching view of the attendees of the 1961 White House Conference on Aging

The 2015 White House Conference on Aging

2015 marks the 50th anniversary of Medicare, Medicaid, and the Older Americans Act, as well as the 80th anniversary of Social Security. The 2015 White House Conference on Aging is an opportunity to recognize the importance of these key programs as well as to look ahead to the issues that will help shape the landscape for older Americans for the next decade.

In the past, conference processes were determined by statute with the form and structure directed by Congress through legislation authorizing the Older Americans Act. To date, Congress has not reauthorized the Older Americans Act, and the pending bill does not include a statutory requirement or framework for the 2015 conference.

However, the White House is committed to hosting a White House Conference on Aging in 2015 and intends to seek broad public engagement and work closely with stakeholders in developing the conference. We also plan to use web tools and social media to encourage as many older Americans as possible to participate. We are engaging with stakeholders and members of the public about the issues and ideas most important to older individuals, their caregivers, and families. We also encourage people to submit their ideas directly through the Get Involved section on this website.

January 14, 2015 in Consumer Information, Federal Statutes/Regulations, Other, Programs/CLEs, Web/Tech, Webinars, Weblogs | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, December 3, 2014

Canada: New online program aims to help reduce financial abuse of seniors through education and awareness

Launch of Financial Abuse of Older Adults: Recognize, Review and Respond program marks end of Financial Literacy Month

In honour of November being Financial Literacy Month, Credit Union Central of Canada (CUCC) has partnered with Credit Union Central of Manitoba (CUCM) and Prevent Elder Abuse Manitoba (PEAM) – in collaboration with the Financial Consumer Agency of Canada – to launch a new online course: Financial Abuse of Older Adults: Recognize, Review and Respond.  The purpose of this course is to help educate credit union staff about financial elder abuse and provide them with key information, including: how to identify incidences of elder abuse; how to mitigate the risks; community resources available; as well as the legal and ethical responsibilities of both the financial institution and the senior involved.  Upon completion of the course, credit union employees will have the opportunity to share their knowledge with members of the community – especially with Canadian seniors –, to help them understand more about elder abuse and how to prevent it happening to them.  Minister of State (Seniors), the Honourable Alice Wong; Minister of Healthy Living and Seniors (Manitoba), the Honourable Deanne Crothers; Lawrence Toet, MP (Elmwood-Transcona); Jane Rooney, Financial Literacy Leader; Martha Durdin, President and CEO of Credit Union Central of Canada, and Ted Richert, Vice President, Credit Union Central of Manitoba will make remarks.  The program was written and developed by Tamlo International Inc. and will be distributed exclusively by CUSOURCE Credit Union Knowledge Network, a wholly owned subsidiary of Credit Union Central of Canada that provides learning and development solutions to the Canadian credit union system.

Source:  Canada News Wire

December 3, 2014 in Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, International, Other, Programs/CLEs | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Sunday, November 2, 2014

Laughter is Great Medicine-Even When Talking About Zombies

Start your week with a laugh, or at least a smile.

One of the many blogs I read, GeriPal, ran an excellent parody for Halloween that had me howling....with laughter at the author's cleverness. Addressing Unmet Palliative and Geriatric Needs of Zombies  is a hysterical must-read. The title gives you an excellent preview. And don't ignore the links in the article to the other sources, especially the one regarding the speed with which the Grim Reaper walks (at least the section on strengths and limitations).

 

November 2, 2014 in Advance Directives/End-of-Life, Cognitive Impairment, Health Care/Long Term Care, Other | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

On the Escalator of An Aging Society?

A few days ago I blogged about an article in The Atlantic explaining one person's thinking of 75 being his optimal "old age". In that same issue of The Atlantic is another article--about longevity and 100 year olds--what it will mean for society as more of us reach that age.  What Happens When We All Live to 100? was published on September 17, 2014.

The article starts with a history of sorts of life expectancies from human origins and notes that

Viewed globally, the lengthening of life spans seems independent of any single, specific event. It didn’t accelerate much as antibiotics and vaccines became common. Nor did it retreat much during wars or disease outbreaks. A graph of global life expectancy over time looks like an escalator rising smoothly. The trend holds, in most years, in individual nations rich and poor; the whole world is riding the escalator.

Projections of ever-longer life spans assume no incredible medical discoveries—rather, that the escalator ride simply continues. If anti-aging drugs or genetic therapies are found, the climb could accelerate. Centenarians may become the norm, rather than rarities who generate a headline in the local newspaper.

The article then moves to a discussion of those institutions intentionally working on increasing life spans, the Buck Institute, the U of Michigan, the U of Texas, UC-San Francisco, and the Mayo Clinic for example. Long-term readers of this blog may also remember a post about CALICO (Google's "spin-off called the California Life Company (known as Calico) to specialize in longevity research."). The article has a fascinating section about the research being done, including some interesting consideration of other life forms that excel in longevity (worm genes, anyone?).

I particular enjoyed reading the quote of one of the leaders in the field in describing the nascent nature of the research. "'[M]edically, we do not know what ‘age’ is. The sole means to determine age is by asking for date of birth. That’s what a basic level this research still is at.'”  There seems to be some debate amongst the experts about whether life expectancy will continue to rise at the steady escalator-smooth rate as in years past.  The article also mentions some of the theories advanced over time on increasingly longevity: vitamins, low calorie diets, education, exercise, etc.

One section of the article bears significant possibilities for class discussion, the political implications of an older society.

Society is dominated by the old—old political leaders, old judges. With each passing year, as longevity increases, the intergenerational imbalance worsens. The old demand benefits for which the young must pay, while people in their 20s become disenchanted, feeling that the deck is stacked against them. National debt increases at an alarming rate. Innovation and fresh thinking disappear as energies are devoted to defending current pie-slicing arrangements.

The author reveals this is a description of what is actually occurring in Japan. Consider as the author does, what increased longevity may also do to the judicial branch--especially the Supreme Court with lifetime appointments.

This article may be viewed as a bit of a wake-up alarm, although I suspect many of the folks in the US will just hit the snooze button

People’s retirement savings simply must increase, though this means financial self-discipline, which Americans are not known for. Beyond that, most individuals will likely need to take a new view of what retirement should be: not a toggle switch—no work at all, after years of full-time labor—but a continuum on which a person gradually downshifts to half-time, then to working now and then. Let’s call it the “retirement track” rather than retirement: a phase of continuing to earn and save as full-time work winds down.

Widespread adoption of a retirement track would necessitate changes in public policy and in employers’ attitudes. Banks don’t think in terms of smallish loans to help a person in the second half of life start a home-based business, but such lending might be vital to a graying population. Many employers are required to continue offering health insurance to those who stay on the job past 65, even though they are eligible for Medicare. Employers’ premiums for these workers are much higher than for young workers, which means employers may have a logical reason to want anyone past 65 off the payroll. Ending this requirement would make seniors more attractive to employers.

Back to the reasons for increasing longevity. One in the list above, education, seems to have a solid correlation and maybe not as obvious as other reasons that come to mind (vaccines, antibiotics, improved health care, public services, etc.).  The author considers the role of education in longevity and examining budget cuts by states, suggests

Many of the social developments that improve longevity—better sanitation, less pollution, improved emergency rooms—are provided to all on an egalitarian basis. But today’s public high schools are dreadful in many inner-city areas, and broadly across states ... Legislatures are cutting support for public universities, while the cost of higher education rises faster than inflation. These issues are discussed in terms of fairness; perhaps health should be added as a concern in the debate. If education is the trump card of longevity, the top quintile may pull away from the rest

The last section of the article hypothesizes on the impact of an aging society if the escalator continues its ascent, achieving perhaps a "grey utopia" of sorts. The article is well worth reading, but it makes me think about how society values, or devalues, aging. Is getting old a challenge or disease to be conquered?  For example, the author writes, "[i]f the passage of time itself turns out to be the challenge, interdisciplinary study of aging might overtake the disease-by-disease approach. As recently as a generation ago, it would have seemed totally crazy to suppose that aging could be “cured.” Now curing aging seems, well, only somewhat crazy."  Read this article and have your students read it, too.

October 1, 2014 in Current Affairs, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Health Care/Long Term Care, Other, Science, Statistics | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, September 23, 2014

The Jordan Liebhaber Scholarship Fund and Elder Decisions accepting applications for scholarship


The
Jordan Liebhaber Scholarship Fund and Elder Decisions® are, for the second time, jointly sponsoring a scholarship for a young adult between the ages of 18 to 30 to attend Elder Decisions® Elder / Adult Family Mediation Training.

The Jordan Liebhaber Scholarship Fund was created in loving memory of Jordan Washor Liebhaber, May 22, 1986 - March 29, 2013, with the intention to carry forward Jordan’s clear values and good works to help make the world a better, more caring place for our elders.  The fund seeks to help young adults with interest in the elder services field.

If you or someone you know is between the ages of 18 to 30, a trained mediator, and interested in participating in Elder Mediation Training held in Newton, MA, on
October 28-30, 2014, please submit an application directly to the fund (a link to the application is below).  The selected applicant may enroll in the Elder Decisions® October training at a rate of $75, with the remaining registration fee shared equally by The Jordan Liebhaber Scholarship Fund and Elder Decisions®.  (Note that transportation and lodging costs, if any, are the responsibility of the recipient.)   

Proposals will be reviewed on a rolling basis, and are due for the training no later than October 1st, 2014Applications for other uses of the scholarship fund are also welcome. 
 
For more information about the fund, and to read about recent award recipients, please visit www.bnaior.org/JLscholarship.html.   
 
For questions about the Elder Decisions® Elder / Adult Family Mediation training programs, please visit www.elderdecisions.com/pg19.cfm or contact Crystal Thorpe at 617-621-7009 x24

September 23, 2014 in Other, Programs/CLEs | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, September 9, 2014

Intergenerational Housing--A Cool Idea From Oregon

One of the things (among the many things) I like to post about is the concept of age-friendly communities that allow a person to age in place.  Governing ran an article last month, showcasing a cool project in Oregon that provides intergenerational housing. Young and Old Find Common Ground in Oregon Housing Community explains about Bridge Meadows where elders and foster children reside in the same housing complex, where the units are provided for free to the foster parents.  "Bridge Meadows, a 36-unit apartment complex in [Portland] ... mixes incomes, generations and skill sets in a way that enlivens and enriches the lives of young and old alike." Twenty-seven of the units are for lower-income elders with the rest for those who will be foster parents (or even legal guardians) for at least 3 children within 5 years. Not only do the elders get a break on the housing costs they get to be involved!

[E]lders volunteer their time to work with the kids in the complex. For at least 100 hours per quarter, they tutor, cook, babysit, participate in outdoor activities and so forth. The complex also offers a computer room, library, public courtyard and community garden to help foster connections.

As far as the kids, the program has had a pretty significant impact. Of the "29 children ... 24 were formerly in foster care. Of those 24, just over half are either adopted or in legal guardianship and the rest are on their way to adoption or legal guardianship. In other words, they're all now part of functional families, in permanency or on their way."

The head of Bridge Meadows is pretty enthused about this model's ability to be duplicated, noting that it serves as a solution for 2 serious problems our society is facing, (1) "how to civically attend to our rapidly aging population and" (2) "how to place all the troubled kids peppering children and family services systems in the country."

The author has some concerns about effective replication but still considers this program jan important addition to the spectrum of strategies.  It is a nifty idea! More information about the project, as well as photos, are available on their website.

September 9, 2014 in Current Affairs, Housing, Other | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, August 27, 2014

Wow. Just, wow.

A couple who met as teenagers 10 years before the start of World War Two have celebrated 80 years of marriage. Maurice and Helen Kaye, from Bournemouth, met in 1929 when they were 17 and 16 respectively. They courted for four years because Mrs Kaye's mother wanted her older sister to be married first. The couple, who are now 102 and 101, said the secret to a happy marriage was being tolerant of each other and being willing to "forgive and forget". The pair, one of Britain's longest-married couples, plan to celebrate their oak wedding anniversary with children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

Source/more:  BBC

August 27, 2014 in Other | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Increase in seniors with HIV

 The Centers for Disease Control says more than 1 million people in the U.S. are living with HIV, and almost 1 in 6 don't know they are infected. This could affect Suncoast seniors who may be unaware of the dangers.  There are certain things we are hesitant to discuss with children, and frequently those same topics are avoided with seniors. But whether we address it or not, older people are not only sexually active; according to the American Academy of HIV Medicine, by 2015, half the U.S. HIV population will be age fifty or older.  “But they think they're not at risk. In their day, condoms were only for birth control. And so today, they don't have to worry about birth control and they don't know about HIV and all the other STD's that they could have to worry about.”  Seniors with HIV that don't realize it are in a very dangerous position. “HIV accelerates and predisposes you to a number of diseases which causes death.

Read more:  WWSB/ABC News

August 19, 2014 in Health Care/Long Term Care, Other | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, August 14, 2014

Health Affairs Call for Papers: Caring for Older Adults

Health Affairs Journal: Call for Papers on Care for Older Adults


The journal Health Affairs is seeking articles on older adults, and specifically regarding the care and management of multiple chronic conditions among this population. We are interested in work that spans the full range of care settings, including primary care and specialty practices, hospitals, nursing homes and other long-term care settings. We are grateful to The John A. Hartford Foundation for providing support for our ongoing coverage of these topics. There is no deadline for submissions; papers on these topics will be considered on an ongoing basis and considered for publication through 2015. For more information, contact Health Affairs executive editor, Don Metz: dmetz@projecthope.org.

August 14, 2014 in Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Health Care/Long Term Care, Other | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Monday, August 11, 2014

New York teen wins $50,000 prize for invention aiding Alzheimer's patients

Via Reuters:

A New York teenager whose grandfather suffers from Alzheimer's disease won a $50,000 science prize for developing wearable sensors that send mobile alerts when a dementia patient begins to wander away from bed, officials said on Wednesday.  Kenneth Shinozuka, 15, who took home the Scientific American Science in Action Award, said his invention was inspired by his grandfather's symptoms, which frequently caused him to wander from bed in the middle of the night and hurt himself.  "I will never forget how deeply moved my entire family was when they first witnessed my sensor detecting Grandfather's wandering," Shinozuka said in a statement. "At that moment, I was struck by the power of technology to change lives."  His invention uses coin-sized wireless sensors that are worn on the feet of a potential wanderer. The sensors detect pressure caused when the person stands up, triggering an audible alert on a caregiver's smartphone using an app.

The award honors a project that aims to make a practical difference by addressing an environmental, health or resources challenge, said Scientific American Editor in Chief Mariette DiChristina.

Read more at Reuters.

August 11, 2014 in Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Grant Deadlines/Awards, Other, Web/Tech | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Sunday, August 10, 2014

China's Rural Elderly Don't Get Enough Medical Care

Via Bloomberg:   

By 2050, a quarter of China’s population is expected to be age 65 or older. Although the government has recently loosened its restrictive population policy to allow most couples to have two children, so far it doesn’t look likely that any forthcoming baby boom will save China from its rapidly aging population.  China’s current elderly, especially those living in rural areas, frequently endure chronic medical conditions without treatment, according to a new study in the journal International Health. Dai Baozhen of Jiangsu University’s Department of Health Policy & Management analyzed the results of China’s semi-regular “health and nutrition survey” for 2009, looking in particular at the responses from rural households in nine provinces.

Among his findings: China’s elderly are likely to be less educated than younger cohorts and often poorer. Nearly 70 percent of the rural elderly in the survey had an annual income of less than 5,000 renminbi ($810). Many also said their children had left home to work in cities, and while they might send money back, they couldn’t provide steady emotional support or help in obtaining and monitoring health care. Fifty-eight percent of the elderly respondents were illiterate, another barrier in obtaining health services.

It was not uncommon for China’s rural elderly to suffer chronic conditions, according to the study, including hypertension (18 percent), asthma (6 percent), and diabetes (3 percent). And those figures represent diagnosed conditions—the worrying possibility exists that many elderly suffer in the absence of any diagnosis. Fully a quarter of elderly were diagnosed with hypertension, and a third of those diagnosed with diabetes received no treatment.

Isolation and depression are also significant risks for rural elderly. China’s overall suicide rate has dropped sharply over the past two decades, especially among rural women under age 35. But among China’s elderly, it remains distressingly high. According to a recent study by researchers at the University of Hong Kong, cited by the Economist, the suicide rate for men in the Chinese countryside aged 70 to 74 is 41.7 per 100,000 (more than four times higher than the national average of 9.8 per 100,000).

Source/read more:  Bloomberg

Read the full study.

Compare US.

August 10, 2014 in Health Care/Long Term Care, Other | Permalink | TrackBack (0)