Thursday, September 20, 2018

Issue Brief: Older Adults, Legal Services & Disaster Assistance

Florence has moved on, the California wildfires are  under containment, and there is still that volcano in Hawaii... so it's only a matter of time until the next natural disaster. So the National Center on Law & Elder Rights recent issue brief from Fay Gordon at Justice in Aging, Legal Services and Disaster Assistance, is so timely.  As the issue brief notes, "Legal aid organizations are quickly mobilizing to help older adults impacted by recent hurricanes,
wildfires, and volcanoes. Older adults are at increased risk of disease and death during disasters due to a higher prevalence of chronic conditions, physical disability, cognitive impairment, and other functional limitations.1 Potential limitations in mobility, access to transportation or limitations can further exacerbate the challenges older adults face during emergencies." (citations omitted) The brief offers resources from several agencies, offers a quick summary of the toolkit for state Medicaid agencies and consumer protection advice. This is all very useful information for us, regardless of where we live.  Bookmark this issue brief!

September 20, 2018 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Health Care/Long Term Care, Other | Permalink

Monday, September 10, 2018

How Retirement of Baby Boomer Business Owners Will Affect Employees

The Washington Post recently published an interesting article considering the implications of retirement of business owners on employees. What a ‘silver tsunami’ of retiring Baby Boomer business owners could mean for their workers  focuses on the implication of "the wave of retiring Boomers who own closely held private businesses. They will need to sell their companies, transition them to a new generation of owners -- or risk shutting them down, cutting jobs in the process."

The article looks at "a little noticed measure in the recently signed defense spending bill aims to address the widening wealth divide between workers and the owners or top executives who manage them. The measure, co-sponsored by Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.), is intended to expand financing options and raise awareness for programs that can help employees become partial owners of the companies where they work" which "make[s] it possible for firms to use Small Business Administration loans to finance what’s known as employee stock ownership plans, or ESOPs, an arrangement that can help transfer ownership of the company to employees rather than have to find a suitable buyer or rely on family members who may be ill-suited or unprepared to keep the lights on."

According to one expert, this change is a big deal, although the "immediate impact is probably limited to small companies: The SBA loans that can be used are capped at $5 million, though they can be combined with other financing." 

Stay tuned!

September 10, 2018 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Federal Statutes/Regulations, Other | Permalink

Wednesday, September 5, 2018

Rituals for the Death of Residents in LTC Facilities

When a resident of a long term care facility dies, should that person's passing be marked in some way?  According to a recent article in Kaiser Health News, Creating Rituals To Honor The Dead At Long-Term-Care Facilities one expert says the answer to that question is yes. This expert 

wants to see bereavement openly acknowledged at facilities throughout Georgia to end what she calls “the silence surrounding loss and death in long-term care.” Following in-depth discussions with more than 70 staffers, residents and family members at nine facilities in central Georgia, she has created two handbooks on “best practices in bereavement care” and is gearing up to offer educational seminars and staff training in dozens of nursing homes and assisted living residences across the state.

As the article explains, "[f]raught reactions to loss and death are common among nursing assistants and other staff in long-term-care facilities, research shows. When feelings aren’t acknowledged, grief can go underground and lead to a host of physical and psychological symptoms, including depression, distancing and burnout." The article offers several stories as well as some best practices. Some of those "best practices include offering support to grieving residents and relatives of the deceased, recognizing residents’ bereavement needs in care plans, and having a protocol to prepare bodies for final viewing." Others develop unique acknowledgements of a resident's death, including the use of candles, balloon releases and other activities..

September 5, 2018 in Advance Directives/End-of-Life, Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Health Care/Long Term Care, Other | Permalink

Wednesday, August 29, 2018

Reforming Social Security - Child Caregiver Credits?

The Center for Retirement Research at Boston College has released an issue brief, #18-15, Modernizing Social Security: Caregiver Credits.  The brief opens with the statement of the problem

Women still tend to work fewer years and earn less than men, which leads to less income in retirement. One reason is that women are often still the main family caregiver. Traditionally, Social Security has recognized this role by providing spousal and widow benefits for married women. Today, however, many women are not eligible for these benefits because they never married or they divorced prior to the 10-year threshold needed to qualify. Even those who are married are less likely to receive a spousal benefit, as their worker benefit is larger. Thus, many mothers receive little to no support to offset lost earnings due to childrearing.

The 10 page brief looks at how the topic is handled in other countries and discusses two avenues for resolution in the U.S.: (1) "[i]ncrease the number of work years that are excluded from benefit calculations ... [and] (2) [p]rovide earnings credits to parents with a child under age six for up to five years." The article concludes in part

It is easy to understand the appeal of crediting Social Security records to reflect lost earnings due to caring for a child. In the past, this activity was usually compensated for by the spousal benefit, but changes in women’s work and marriage patterns have left fewer eligible for it. A credit is also more appealing than a spousal benefit if the goal is to compensate for the
costs of childrearing, independent of marital status.

August 29, 2018 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Federal Statutes/Regulations, Other, Social Security | Permalink

Tuesday, August 28, 2018

More on Family Caregivers

On several occasions I've written about the issues of caregivers (the shortage of family caregivers, the financial impact on care giving) so i was interested in this article by Kaiser Health News,    A Late-Life Surprise: Taking Care Of Frail, Aging Parents notes the failure of adult children to plan for their roles of caregivers-a role that may last a number of years and even cause the adult child to stop working. The KHN story focuses the profile of a "typical family caregiver, "“When we think of an adult child caring for a parent, what comes to mind is a woman in her late 40s or early 50s,” said Lynn Friss Feinberg, senior strategic policy adviser for AARP’s Public Policy Institute. “But it’s now common for people 20 years older than that to be caring for a parent in their 90s or older.”  The story cites a new study from "the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College [which] is the first to document how often this happens. It found that 10 percent of adults ages 60 to 69 whose parents are alive serve as caregivers, as do 12 percent of adults age 70 and older."

The study shows that "about 17 percent of adult children care for their parents at some point in their lives, and the likelihood of doing so rises with age ... because parents who’ve reached their 80s, 90s or higher are more likely to have chronic illnesses and related disabilities and to require assistance, said Alice Zulkarnain, co-author of the study."

So consider the implications, some of which I mentioned in the above parenthetical in the opening sentence.  The article lists the physical wear and tear "on older [caregiver] bodies, which are more vulnerable and less able to recover from physical strain" the potential for psychological stressors which can exacerbate any health issues the older caregiver may have, and social isolation of caregivers.  There's also the financial toll that may come, with "hard-earned savings at risk with no possibility of replacing them by re-entering the workforce."  

The article mentions a number of caregiver resources.  The report from the Center for Retirement Research is available here.

August 28, 2018 in Cognitive Impairment, Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Health Care/Long Term Care, Other, Statistics | Permalink

Monday, August 27, 2018

Micro-chipping Grandma?

The title is somewhat tongue in cheek (I use the phrase in my class to be provocative) but it was only a matter of time until the potential of a micro-chip for elders was becoming a reality. This firm already microchips employees. Could your ailing relative be next? in the Washington Post, explains that a firm that already microchips employees is looking to develop "a more sophisticated microchip that is powered by human body heat and includes GPS tracking capabilities and voice activation [and]... [they] acknowledge that the chips will offer a convenient way to track people — especially those suffering from Alzheimer’s and dementia."  The chip the company has in mind will do more than just track whereabouts, according to the article. It will have a medical component that will track the wearer's vitals and notify the wearer's doctor if something is amiss. These "medical microchips" have proponents as well as detractors as the article explains.

The article offers that only about half of the company's employees opted for the microchip, and there are other companies using the technology with humans. One expert thinks using microchips with humans is going to be a done-deal, but not for a few decades.  I'm all for the use of tech, but worry about privacy, informed consent and cyber security issues.  Although it requires a chip to be inserted into the body, is it any less invasive than cameras or technology monitoring devices such as those used in a medical cottage or a gps tracker in a cane or shoes? I still hold out hope for privacy....even though it may be eroding.

August 27, 2018 in Cognitive Impairment, Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Health Care/Long Term Care, Other, Web/Tech | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, August 13, 2018

Elders in Bankruptcy On the Rise

A recent article, ‘Too little too late’: bankruptcy booms among older Americans published in The Business Times opens with a sobering thought: "[f]or a rapidly growing share of older Americans, traditional ideas about life in retirement are being upended by a dismal reality: bankruptcy." A new study featured in the article paints a foreboding picture for many elder Americans "'[t]he rate of people 65 and older filing for bankruptcy is three times what it was in 1991, the study found, and the same group accounts for a far greater share of all filers." What is causing this increase? According to the article, many factors, including changes in pension plans, health care out of pocket costs, declining incomes, to name a few.  It notes as well that elder Americans may have more challenges in recovering from financial setbacks than others.  The study is done by the Consumer Bankruptcy Project, which "is a long-running effort now led by Thorne; Lawless; Pamela Foohey, a law professor at Indiana University; and Katherine Porter, a law professor at the University of California, Irvine. The project — which is financed by their universities — collects and analyzes court records on a continuing basis and follows up with written questionnaires. ... Their latest study —which was posted online Sunday and has been submitted to an academic journal for peer review — is based on a sample of personal bankruptcy cases and questionnaires completed by 895 filers ages 19 to 92."

The paper by the study authors, Graying of U.S. Bankruptcy: Fallout from Life in a Risk Society has been placed on SSRN.

The abstract offers this

The social safety net for older Americans has been shrinking for the past couple decades. The risks associated with aging, reduced income, and increased healthcare costs, have been off-loaded onto older individuals. At the same time, older Americans are increasingly likely to file consumer bankruptcy, and their representation among those in bankruptcy has never been higher. Using data from the Consumer Bankruptcy Project, we find more than a two-fold increase in the rate at which older Americans (age 65 and over) file for bankruptcy and an almost five-fold increase in the percentage of older persons in the U.S. bankruptcy system. The magnitude of growth in older Americans in bankruptcy is so large that the broader trend of an aging U.S. population can explain only a small portion of the effect. In our data, older Americans report they are struggling with increased financial risks, namely inadequate income and unmanageable costs of healthcare, as they try to deal with reductions to their social safety net. As a result of these increased financial burdens, the median senior bankruptcy filer enters bankruptcy with negative wealth of $17,390 as compared to more than $250,000 for their non-bankrupt peers. For an increasing number of older Americans, their golden years are fraught with economic risks, the result of which is often bankruptcy.

August 13, 2018 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Federal Statutes/Regulations, Other, Retirement, Statistics | Permalink

Tuesday, July 24, 2018

More on Caregiver Shortages

We have blogged in the past on the family caregiver shortage heading our way.  Some might even call it a crisis as the baby boomers relentlessly age on in large numbers. On Monday, one item in Kaiser Health News daily briefing offers this headline For Generations, Nation Has Relied On Family Caregivers. But Shifting Social Dynamics Could Leave A Vacuum.The Wall Street Journal examined this issue in America Is Running Out of Family Caregivers, Just When It Needs Them Most(subscription required). The article opens with a focus on one elder who has no children. Who will be her caregiver? "For generations, the nation has relied on family members to keep aging loved ones in their homes. Today, many Americans are growing older without family nearby, offering a glimpse of what the future may hold for the cohort of Americans who are approaching retirement."

The article pains a somewhat distressing picture of the future facing many older Americans, with low incomes, substantial debt (the article notes some of which may be from caring for their parents), and no family or nearby family to be caregivers. Currently nearly 95% of caregivers are family providing approximately "$500 billion worth of free care annually [yes you read that correctly--BILLION]—three times Medicaid’s professional long-term care spending—and help keep people out of costly institutions, according to a 2017 Merrill Lynch study."  That sounds wonderful, but here is where this is all about to fall apart: "the supply of these caregivers is shrinking just as the nation needs them most. Every day, 10,000 people turn 65. In 2020, there will be 56 million people 65 and older, up from 40 million in 2010" while the number of available caregivers is shrinking, for a variety of reasons.  Are there other options? Yes-private sector, but that's expensive and home health aides may be in limited supply. We already know about the limited benefits through Medicare and Medicaid. Boomers, no strangers to being part of the sandwich generation, may now find themselves in a different type of sandwich-they may be providing care for their parents and will perhaps need care for themselves or their spouses.  Families are far flung, so caregiving from afar may be a new model.  "Children do what they can from hundreds of miles away, checking references for an aide, managing bills, or arranging grocery deliveries. They often feel guilty for not being there to take a parent to the doctor and uncertain about how someone is really doing."

Technology (and there are a lot of cool options out there) may be offered as a mode of caregiving, perhaps even a substitute for an in person caregiver, but technology is not without limits. In some areas volunteers are filling in the gaps but of course, funding and sufficient volunteers can be an issue.

So what should these "elder orphans" do? "One-third of middle-age adults are heading toward their retirement years as singles. Women, in particular, are likely to stay or become single as they age....About 14% of frail older adults, or two million people, are without children and the number is expect to double by 2040, according to the AARP Public Policy Institute. “There’s no natural caregiver for this population,” says Grace Whiting, CEO of the National Alliance for Caregiving....While they can, they need to construct a network around themselves, aging experts say."

The article concludes with 5 recommendations, including local area agencies on aging, transportation, private companies, technology and remodeling a home to make it accessible. To that list I'd add, make a plan and talk to your elder law attorney about it.  This is a comprehensive article that would be a good basis for a class discussion!

 
 
 
 
 

July 24, 2018 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Health Care/Long Term Care, Housing, Other | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, July 23, 2018

Taxpayer Identity Theft

Ugh, identity theft. It's just awful.  Too many people have their identities stolen and the thieves use the information to file false tax returns. Is the IRS doing enough to protect taxpayers? The GAO recently released a report analyzing the actions of the IRS and making recommendations.  Identity Theft: IRS Needs to Strengthen Taxpayer Authentication Efforts provides 11 recommendations from the GAO, revolving around identity authentication. Recommendations include policies for undertaking risk assessments through a variety of mediums, since taxpayers don't use the same communications method to contact the IRS, examine procedures and collect data. The full report is available here.  The landing page also offers highlights as well as a podcast. And here's a bonus recommendation-whatever safeguards the IRS uses for authentication, how about making the reporting process as easy as possible for the victims?  Just a thought....

July 23, 2018 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Federal Cases, Federal Statutes/Regulations, Other | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, July 11, 2018

How "Liveable" is Your Community?

AARP has named the top 10 cities with populations  500,000 and over that are the most "liveable." I'm not living in one of the top ten-are you? Nor am I living in one of the top 10 mid-sized (100,000-499,999) "liveable" communities. Nope, not living in one of the top 10 small (25,000-99,999) "liveable" communities either. 

How does AARP determine if a community meets their liveability scale?  The website explains that "AARP developed the Livability Index, a ground-breaking tool—now in its third year—that uses more than 50 national data sources and 60 indicators spread across seven categories to jump-start community conversations about livability and encourage action by consumers and policymakers alike.It turns out that many of the characteristics that make a community “livable” are the same across all ages: safety and security, affordable and appropriate housing and transportation, and the ability to live near family and friends who can be relied upon." The index looks at housing, environment, health, community engagement, employment, neighborhoods and transportation. How does your city fare?

BTW, this could be a really good exercise for students to do in their elder law course. The fall semester will be here before we know it!

July 11, 2018 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Health Care/Long Term Care, Housing, Other, Statistics | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, June 22, 2018

Where the Elders Are

CityLab recently ran a story about populations and particularly, where elders are residing. Mapping America’s Aging Population explains that "Demographers and geographers have watched as this aging cohort transformed the U.S., from young children in the 1950s and 1960s to senior citizens today. This graying of America has left a distinctive geographical fingerprint."

Want to guess where elders are living?  If you started with the sunbelt you would be somewhat correct. "Unsurprisingly, popular retirement states like Florida and Arizona have high concentrations of older Americans... What may be more of a surprise is the broad swaths of elderly running through the Midwest and the Appalachians. These regions have aged significantly, as many younger residents headed toward the coasts."  The demographic maps provide good pictorial representations of the locations where elders are living.

The article looks at births and deaths and relocation. Interestingly, "[p]eople are less likely to move as they age. In 1968, parents of the baby boomers were in their highly mobile, young adult years, but today boomers are older and more apt to stay where they are."

The Boomers seem to be clustering in certain geographic areas:

Baby boomers have contributed to this trend. Fifty years ago, this group was spread out evenly among the rest of the general population. By 1990, they had became more bicoastal and were concentrated in a small number of dynamic, growing metropolitan areas.

Between 1990 and 2000, a substantial number of boomers flocked from these metro areas to amenity-laden retirement and pre-retirement regions, like the Pacific Northwest, Florida, northern Wisconsin and Michigan, as well as some areas of the South, like the Ozark region and the Western Carolinas.

These areas have continued to grow, while baby boomers moved away in their greatest numbers from the southern Great Plains and the area along the Mississippi River Valley.

Thanks to my colleague and dear friend, Mark Bauer, for sending me the article.

 

 

June 22, 2018 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Housing, Other, Property Management, Retirement, Statistics | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, June 19, 2018

Interpreting a Living Will in the ER Setting

Maybe it's just me, but does it seem to you that there are a lot of articles of late about advance directives and end of life issues?  Here's a recent one published by Kaiser Health News.   That ‘Living Will’ You Signed? At The ER, It Could Be Open To Interpretation.

opens with an ER nurse saying DNR because the patient had a living will, but reading the document showed the language to be just the opposite, "'[d]o everything possible,' it read, with a check approving cardiopulmonary resuscitation."  The point is to illustrate the mistake that the existence of a living will automatically means no resuscitation. "Unfortunately, misunderstandings involving documents meant to guide end-of-life decision-making are “surprisingly common,” said [the] medical director of advance-care planning and end-of-life education for Huntsville Hospital Health System in Alabama."

There's a new report from Pennsylvania, Empowering Patients and Agents to Help Prevent Errors with Living Wills, DNRs, and POLSTs

In 2016, acute healthcare facilities in the Commonwealth reported through the Pennsylvania Patient Safety Reporting System (PA-PSRS) nearly 100 events involving the code status or treatment level of patients. Twenty-nine patients were resuscitated against their wishes. Two patients were not treated when their wishes indicated they should have been. The remaining cases represent near misses that could have affected the patient, but were resolved before harm occurred.

The Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority is unable to verify whether the do not resuscitate (DNR) orders or physician orders for life-sustaining treatment (POLST) were appropriate, correctly created, or verified prior to these patient safety events occurring in real time.

The Kaiser Health News article details communication missteps and offers that

The problem, Hoffman explained, is that doctors and nurses receive little, if any, training in understanding and interpreting living wills, DNR orders and Physician Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment (POLST) forms, either on the job or in medical or nursing school.

Communication breakdowns and a pressure-cooker environment in emergency departments, where life-or-death decisions often have to be made within minutes, also contribute to misunderstandings, other experts said.

One expert interviewed for the article suggests these missteps are more common explaining his use of hypotheticals where "he has asked medical providers how they would respond to hypothetical situations involving patients with critical and terminal illnesses."  He goes on to explain

He described a 46-year-old woman brought to the ER with a heart attack and suddenly goes into cardiac arrest. Although she’s otherwise healthy, she has a living will refusing all potentially lifesaving medical interventions. What would you do, he asked more than 700 physicians in an internet survey?

Only 43 percent of those doctors said they would intervene to save her life — a troubling figure...Since this patient didn’t have a terminal condition, her living will didn’t apply to the situation at hand and every physician should have been willing to offer aggressive treatment, he explained.

The article offers some suggestions from one expert to avoid these situations: "[m]ake sure you have ongoing discussions about your end-of-life preferences with your physician, surrogate decision-maker, if you have one, and family, especially when your health status changes...  Without these conversations, documents can be difficult to interpret."

June 19, 2018 in Advance Directives/End-of-Life, Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Health Care/Long Term Care, Other | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, June 7, 2018

BBB: Sweepstakes & Lottery Scams

The Better Business Bureau recently released a new report, Sweepstakes, Lottery and Prize Scams. So why, you ask, am I writing about this report?Because of this:

BBB found these frauds concentrate disproportionately on older people, who suffer the largest losses by far. A vast worldwide industry of sweepstakes mailings specifically targets older victims. Major law enforcement efforts are focused on the millions of deceptive mailings that have flooded the mailboxes of seniors across the country. In addition to money loss, victims often are emotionally devastated when they realize they have been defrauded. Some have even resorted to committing suicide.

In particular, the report offers data for the past 3 years by age group and shows the number of complaints by age and the amount of losses (and the total is staggering). The report ponders why elders are targets, offering

While some studies suggest older consumers are somewhat less likely to be fraud victims than the general population, perhaps because they have more life experience to guide them, there is evidence suggesting they are more likely to become victims of sweepstakes fraud. Complaint data shows more than half of victims are over 60, and those over 70 years old account for more than two thirds of the losses related to this scheme.

Why is this? It is speculated that the fraudsters hope to find victims with mild cognitive impairment, dementia or Alzheimer’s disease. These people often continue sending hundreds of thousands and even millions of dollars to fraudsters. A retired college president sent tens of thousands of dollars to scammers. CNN reported that an older man suffering from Alzheimer’s sent all of his funds to scammers and then committed suicide when the prize money never came. A San Diego TV station explains how one senior victim was defrauded.

In addition, seniors may simply have more money and may have been at the same address, with the same phone number, for a longer time and therefore may be easier to locate.

The 16 page report offers insight onto scams from Jamaica, Costa Rica and social media, provides profile stories of some victims and perpetrators, and offers suggestions and recommendations with contact info for agencies that handle cases of scams and frauds.

There is a lot of information packed into this 16 page report. Check it out!

June 7, 2018 in Consumer Information, Crimes, Current Affairs, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, International, Other, Statistics | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, June 6, 2018

Doctors' Conversations with Patients About Aid-in-Dying

Earlier this week I posted an update on California's aid-in-dying law.  I was interested in this article published in the New England Journal of Medicine, Beyond Legalization — Dilemmas Physicians Confront Regarding Aid in Dying.

Noting that doctors in jurisdictions where aid-in-dying is lawful are will need to have conversations with patients making the request, the author suggests

Physicians can start by clarifying what patients are asking and why. Some ways in which patients might raise the topic of PAD are listed in the box. Not every question about PAD is a request for assisted suicide. Patients might be seeking information, talking through concerns, expressing distress, or trying to ascertain the physician’s views. To clarify the patient’s motivation, physicians might say, “I’ll be glad to answer that question, but first please tell me what led you to ask.”

The author offers some examples of how patients might raise the issues with their doctors and suggests the next step for doctors is to

explore patients’ concerns and identify and address their palliative care needs, regardless of the physicians’ own views or the legal status of PAD where they practice. Discussions could cover patients’ physical symptoms; psychosocial, existential, and spiritual suffering; hopes and fears; and goals of care. All options for end-of-life care should be discussed, including palliative and hospice care and palliative sedation.

It’s also important for physicians to think through what actions they’re willing to take. Both physicians who support PAD and those who oppose it should try to relieve patients’ multidimensional concerns and distress. After comprehensive palliative care is intensified, 46% of patients who have requested PAD change their minds. (citations omitted).

The author recommends the doctors consider the parameters of when they would participate in medical-aid-in-dying, offering that "perceived loss of autonomy and dignity is now a more common reason for requesting PAD than inadequate pain control." (citation omitted). The author also discusses issues that may occur from a doctor's lack of experience in the area and potential adverse outcomes and counseling families about them. The author also offers some comments for doctors who are opposed to medical aid-in-dying  and concludes with this advice: "[r]esponding to inquiries about PAD is new territory for most physicians. To fulfill their obligations to patients and be true to their own values, physicians should think through how they will respond to the challenges raised by these conversations."

 

June 6, 2018 in Advance Directives/End-of-Life, Consumer Information, Health Care/Long Term Care, Other, State Statutes/Regulations | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, June 5, 2018

Thank you Professor Frolik

Professor Larry Frolik is a rock star, plain and simple. If you ask anyone about the development of elder law, especially in law schools, Professor Frolik's is the first name coming to mind. His contributions to the field are immense and so important.  I was saddened to learn in the spring semester that he was retiring at the end of said semester. Serious bummer. But, good news arrived in the form of an email from him late last week. Although he's retired, he reported that he will keep his office at the College of Law at U. Pitt and also his email address. I suspect he'll continue to be involved in the field and for that possibility, I am extremely grateful. Join me by sending Professor Emeritus Frolik an email thanking him for all of his guidance, leadership and contributions to getting the field,and all of us academics, to where we are today!  Thank you Professor Frolik!!!

June 5, 2018 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Other | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, May 29, 2018

Register Now: Free Webinar on Helping Elders Post-Disaster

With hurricane season looming (it starts June 1), this notice about an upcoming webinar is particulary timely. The National Center on Law & Elder Rights has scheduled a free webinar for June 20, 2018 at 2 p.m. edt, Assisting Older Homeowners After a Natural Disaster. The announcement explains this about the webinar

Older adults face unique challenges and exhibit different vulnerabilities during and after a natural disaster. Older homeowners, for example, may need additional assistance securing their homes and moving out of a storm's path. Recovering from the disaster may also be a challenge for older adults on fixed or limited income. This free webcast will address both the practical challenges and resources available to aid older homeowners after a disaster. The discussion will highlight the loss mitigation and other options available to prevent mortgage foreclosure, and housing and other related assistance from FEMA. Closed captioning will be available on this webcast. A link with access to the captions will be shared through GoToWebinar’s chat box shortly before the webcast start time. Presenters: • Odette Williamson, Staff Attorney, National Consumer Law Center • Sapna Aiyer, Managing Attorney, Housing & Consumer Unit, Lone Star Legal Aid

May 29, 2018 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Federal Cases, Federal Statutes/Regulations, Housing, Other | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, May 28, 2018

Chip Chiplin 2018 Recipient of NAELA Theresa Award

One of my heroes, Alfred "Chip" Chiplin, who died last year, was the 2018 recipient of the NAELA Theresa Award. The award is presented by the Theresa Foundation and was awarded at the 24th Annual Theresa awards as well as at NAELA's 2018 annual meeting.  The award "is an annual community service award presented by the Theresa Alessandra Russo Foundation to a NAELA member in recognition of his or her advocacy and support of individuals with disabilities."  The award was accepted by Chip's sister.

More information about the amazing work of the Theresa Foundation is available here.

May 28, 2018 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Other, Programs/CLEs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, May 24, 2018

Not Everyone Is Driving Along the Information Highway

Believe it or not, there are those in the US who are not on the Internet. Although the numbers are growing, some still haven't gotten onto the information highway. We are seeing an increase in the use of the Internet by those we consider elders, but there are still others who don't use it.

Pew Research periodically releases a report on internet use. The last one, a Fact Tank from a couple of months ago, showed a gradual increase.  11% of Americans don’t use the internet. Who are they?explains that "[t]he size of this group has changed little over the past three years, despite ongoing government and social service programs to encourage internet adoption in underserved areas. But that 11% figure is substantially lower than in 2000, when the Center first began to study the social impact of technology. That year, nearly half (48%) of American adults did not use the internet."

The report looks at all age groups, but since this is the elderlawprof blog, I'm interested in the internet usage by elders. The report gives us that:  "[s]eniors are the age group most likely to say they never go online. Although the share of non-internet users ages 65 and older decreased by 7 percentage points since 2016, about a third today do not use the internet, compared with only 2% of 18- to 29-year-olds."

So basically one-third of elders still are off the information highway.  As more and more Boomers move past age 65, it will be interesting to see if that number drops or holds steady.  Our students need to understand that figure, too, since so many of them are online non-stop. 

May 24, 2018 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Other, Statistics, Web/Tech | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, May 23, 2018

Call for Proposals: American Society on Aging 2019 Annual Conference

The American Society on Aging (ASA) has announced its call for proposals for the 2019 AiA conference, to be held April 15-18, 2019 in New Orleans.  Here's a bit of info about the conference

The 2019 conference will have a strong focus on critical and emergent topics facing the field of aging, as well as cutting-edge and responsive programmatic, research, policy and advocacy efforts. Potential interest areas include: emergency/disaster readiness, housing and transportation access, caregiving, substance use/opioid crisis, multiple aspects of dementia, technology and aging, intergenerational models, population health, and shifting policy and legislative issues affecting older adults. Additionally, we welcome proposals spanning the theme of aging that offer innovative policies, programs, practices, models, businesses and learning. 

To learn more, click here. To submit a proposal, click here. Due date for proposals is June 30, 2018.

May 23, 2018 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Other, Programs/CLEs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, May 21, 2018

California Aid-in-Dying Law Overturned

A number of news outlets reported that a trial court judge has overturned California's aid-in-dying law. As an example, the LA Times reported Riverside judge overturns California's doctor-assisted suicide law. The judge ruled "that the California Legislature violated the law by passing the End of Life Option Act during a special session dedicated to healthcare issues, according to the plaintiffs in the case as well as advocates for the law."  The law, which has been in effect about 6 months, has already been used, according to sources quoted in the article.  "In the first six months California's law was in effect, more than 100 people made use of it to end their lives. Fifty-nine percent of them had cancer, according to state data." Both sides on this issue are quoted in the article. The state attorney general has 5 days from the order's entry to file an appeal.

Stay tuned.

 
 

May 21, 2018 in Advance Directives/End-of-Life, Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Health Care/Long Term Care, Other, State Cases, State Statutes/Regulations | Permalink | Comments (0)