Thursday, May 24, 2018

Not Everyone Is Driving Along the Information Highway

Believe it or not, there are those in the US who are not on the Internet. Although the numbers are growing, some still haven't gotten onto the information highway. We are seeing an increase in the use of the Internet by those we consider elders, but there are still others who don't use it.

Pew Research periodically releases a report on internet use. The last one, a Fact Tank from a couple of months ago, showed a gradual increase.  11% of Americans don’t use the internet. Who are they?explains that "[t]he size of this group has changed little over the past three years, despite ongoing government and social service programs to encourage internet adoption in underserved areas. But that 11% figure is substantially lower than in 2000, when the Center first began to study the social impact of technology. That year, nearly half (48%) of American adults did not use the internet."

The report looks at all age groups, but since this is the elderlawprof blog, I'm interested in the internet usage by elders. The report gives us that:  "[s]eniors are the age group most likely to say they never go online. Although the share of non-internet users ages 65 and older decreased by 7 percentage points since 2016, about a third today do not use the internet, compared with only 2% of 18- to 29-year-olds."

So basically one-third of elders still are off the information highway.  As more and more Boomers move past age 65, it will be interesting to see if that number drops or holds steady.  Our students need to understand that figure, too, since so many of them are online non-stop. 

May 24, 2018 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Other, Statistics, Web/Tech | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, May 23, 2018

Call for Proposals: American Society on Aging 2019 Annual Conference

The American Society on Aging (ASA) has announced its call for proposals for the 2019 AiA conference, to be held April 15-18, 2019 in New Orleans.  Here's a bit of info about the conference

The 2019 conference will have a strong focus on critical and emergent topics facing the field of aging, as well as cutting-edge and responsive programmatic, research, policy and advocacy efforts. Potential interest areas include: emergency/disaster readiness, housing and transportation access, caregiving, substance use/opioid crisis, multiple aspects of dementia, technology and aging, intergenerational models, population health, and shifting policy and legislative issues affecting older adults. Additionally, we welcome proposals spanning the theme of aging that offer innovative policies, programs, practices, models, businesses and learning. 

To learn more, click here. To submit a proposal, click here. Due date for proposals is June 30, 2018.

May 23, 2018 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Other, Programs/CLEs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, May 21, 2018

California Aid-in-Dying Law Overturned

A number of news outlets reported that a trial court judge has overturned California's aid-in-dying law. As an example, the LA Times reported Riverside judge overturns California's doctor-assisted suicide law. The judge ruled "that the California Legislature violated the law by passing the End of Life Option Act during a special session dedicated to healthcare issues, according to the plaintiffs in the case as well as advocates for the law."  The law, which has been in effect about 6 months, has already been used, according to sources quoted in the article.  "In the first six months California's law was in effect, more than 100 people made use of it to end their lives. Fifty-nine percent of them had cancer, according to state data." Both sides on this issue are quoted in the article. The state attorney general has 5 days from the order's entry to file an appeal.

Stay tuned.

 
 

May 21, 2018 in Advance Directives/End-of-Life, Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Health Care/Long Term Care, Other, State Cases, State Statutes/Regulations | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, May 18, 2018

Doctors Discussing Gun Safety With Elder Patients

Kaiser Health News published a compilation of recent stories about gun safety and one caught my eye: the advantage of doctors discussing gun safety with elder patients. Doctors Should Be Discussing Gun Safety With Aging Patients, Researchers Say.

The reference to the story  from the LA TImes, As more older Americans struggle with dementia, what happens to their guns?seemed particularly on point and the KHN story published the opening from the LA Times article

The man had been a patient for decades, retired now from a career in which firearms were a part of the job. He was enjoying his days hunting, or at the shooting range with friends. But episodes of confusion had led to a suspicion of dementia, and the nights were the worst: At sundown, he became disoriented, anxious and a little paranoid, and had started sleeping with his loaded pistol under the pillow. One night, he pointed it at his wife as she returned from the bathroom. It wasn't clear whether he recognized her, but he was certainly confused — and she was terrified. Thankfully, the incident did not end in disaster.

Regardless of your position on the gun control debate, consider these statistics from the LA Times article

Roughly 1 in 3 adults over 65 in the United States is thought to own a gun. An additional 12% live in a household with someone who does.

As seniors turn 70, their odds of developing Alzheimer's disease in a given year jump from less than 1% (among those 65 to 69) to 2.5% (among those 70 to 74), and keep rising from there. By 2050, the number of older Americans with Alzheimer's is expected to reach 13.8 million.

The article discusses driver safety and draws corollaries to gun safety. The article highlights the lack of response to this issue at the state level:

No federal laws prohibit the purchase or possession of firearms by a person with dementia. Only two states, Hawaii and Texas, explicitly mention dementia or similar conditions in their firearms statutes.

In Hawaii, any person under treatment for "organic brain syndromes" is prohibited from owning a gun. Texas law makes individuals diagnosed with "chronic dementia" ineligible for a license to carry a handgun in public. But it does not limit such a person's right to purchase or possess firearms.

One expert quoted in the article describes this as not an issue of taking away someone's guns but instead a decision that focuses on the person's safety.

May 18, 2018 in Cognitive Impairment, Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Health Care/Long Term Care, Other, State Cases, State Statutes/Regulations, Statistics | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, May 17, 2018

When I'm 64...Will I Be Relevant?

We all can sing along to that fabulous Beatles song, When I'm 64. Perhaps the Beatles were prescient, as now Kaiser Health News has published an article about remaining relevant in your life when you are 64 and beyond.... Will We Still Be Relevant ‘When We’re 64’? opens with this description

A gnawing sense of irrelevancy and invisibility suddenly hits many aging adults, as their life roles shift from hands-on parent to empty nester or from workaholic to retiree. Self-worth and identity may suffer as that feeling that you matter starts to fade. Older adults see it in the workplace when younger colleagues seem uninterested in their feedback. Those who just retired might feel a bit unproductive.

The article then segues into a discussion of various recent studies that bears out this fear of becoming irrelevant. Whether it's being important at work or important in your personal life, there is a value to being relevant, or even being needed, even if it's just giving advice to a younger person. "Having purpose and meaning forestalls loneliness, which takes an emotional and physical toll. Studies by ... researchers have found that loneliness is associated with weaker immune systems and poorer physical health."

One group in Austin, Texas (the slogan, "Keep Austin Weird")  took initiative by "finding their purpose with a community created by Aging is Cool, an active-aging company founded just over a year ago." The article discusses this community initiative as well as some other ones across the country, volunteering and continued employment. The article closes with an example for all of us: "96-year-old actress Betty White ... [who] still produces good work and she has a great amount of energy... Her entire package promotes a youthful and optimistic attitude.”

May 17, 2018 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Health Care/Long Term Care, Other, Science | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, May 16, 2018

National Senior Fraud Awareness Day

Yesterday, May 15, 2018, was designated by the U.S. Senate as "National Senior Fraud Awareness Day." The reason for the day, according to the Congressional Record is "To Raise Awareness About the Increasing Number of Fraudulent Schemes Targeted At Older People of The United States, To Encourage The Implementation of Policies to Prevent These Scams From Happening, and to Improve Protections From These Scams For Seniors."

Senator Collins for herself and 4 other Senators, and introduced the resolution, S. Res. 506.

Here it is in its entirety:

Whereas, in 2017, there were more than 47,800,000 individuals age 65 or older in the United States (referred to  in this preamble as ``seniors''), and seniors accounted for  14.9 percent of the total population of the United States;

Whereas senior fraud is a growing concern as millions of older people of the United States are targeted by scams each year, including the Internal Revenue Service impersonation scams, sweepstakes and lottery scams, grandparent scams, computer tech support scams, romance scams, work-at-home scams, charity scams, home improvement scams, fraudulent investment schemes, and identity theft; Whereas other types of fraud perpetrated against seniors include health care fraud, health insurance fraud,  counterfeit prescription drug fraud, funeral and cemetery  fraud, ``anti-aging'' product fraud, telemarketing fraud, and internet fraud;
Whereas the Government Accountability Office has estimated that seniors lose a staggering $2,900,000,000 each year to an ever-growing array of financial exploitation schemes and scams;
Whereas, since 2013, the fraud hotline of the Special Committee on Aging of the Senate has received more than 7,200 complaints reporting possible scams from individuals in all 50 States, the District of Columbia, and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico;
Whereas the ease with which criminals contact seniors through the internet and telephone increases as more creative schemes emerge;
Whereas, according to the Consumer Sentinel Network Data Book 2017, released by the Federal Trade Commission, people age 60 years and older were defrauded of $249,000,000 in 2017, with the median loss to defrauded victims age 80 and older averaging $1,092 per person, more than double the average amount lost by those victims between the ages 50 and 59 years old;
Whereas senior fraud is underreported by victims due to embarrassment and lack of information about where to report fraud; and
Whereas May 15, 2018, is an appropriate day to establish as ``National Senior Fraud Awareness Day'': Now, therefore, be it
Resolved, That the Senate--
(1) supports the designation of May 15, 2018, as ``National Senior Fraud Awareness Day'';
(2) recognizes ``National Senior Fraud Awareness Day'' as  an opportunity to raise awareness about the barrage of scams  that individuals age 65 or older in the United States  (referred to in this resolving clause as ``seniors'') face in person, by mail, on the phone, and online;
(3) recognizes that law enforcement, consumer protection groups, area agencies on aging, and financial institutions all play vital roles in preventing scams targeting seniors and educating seniors about those scams;
(4) encourages implementation of policies to prevent these scams and to improve measures to protect seniors from scams targeting seniors; and
(5) honors the commitment and dedication of the individuals and organizations who work tirelessly to fight against scams targeting seniors.

  

 

May 16, 2018 in Consumer Information, Crimes, Current Affairs, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Federal Cases, Federal Statutes/Regulations, Other, State Cases, State Statutes/Regulations | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, May 15, 2018

"Living Apart, Together"

Kaiser Health News ran an interesting story about couples, committed to each other, but living apart, noting that experts have named this as "living apart together." Living Apart Together: A New Option for Older Adults explains about older couples who are seriously committed to each other, spend a lot of time together, including romantic time, but do not live together.  This is described as “a new, emerging form of family, especially among older adults, that’s on the rise,” said Laura Funk, an associate professor of sociology at the University of Manitoba in Canada who’s written about living apart together."  There are several studies examining the frequency, scope and effect of these types of relationships (shortened to LATs).  A number of reasons are given as to why these couples choose to not live together but wanted a companion, including those who seek “intimate companionship” while maintaining their own homes, social circles, customary activities and finances ...." As well, those who had been caregivers, or had a bad marriage or a marriage ending in divorce seem to prefer to not live together. The article offers some fascinating anecdotes.

 

May 15, 2018 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Housing, Other | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, May 13, 2018

New Article: Primer on Disability Law for Land Use & Zoning

The intersection of land use and zoning laws and regs with a person's ability to live at home is so important. I wanted to let you know about a new article on the topic: A Primer on Disability for Land Use and Zoning Law  posted recently on SSRN.  The article is published in Volume 4 of  the Journal of Law, Property, and Society at 1 (March 2018). Here is the abstract

Approximately 20-30 percent of American families have a family member with a disability, many with a mobility impairment. Many people need access to disability services and programs. They need the availability of group homes, senior housing, drug rehabilitation centers, medical marijuana dispensaries, and counseling clinics. This leads to land use disputes.

This Primer is designed for people familiar with property law and land regulation (planning and zoning), and with little experience with disability law. The goal is to present an introduction that facilitates understanding of the intersections between land use law and disability. In general, the legal requirements of primary concern are limited, such that only a few parts of our expansive disability law are most relevant to the vast majority of planning and zoning matters. This Primer will guide the reader through these key provisions. The Acts discussed in this Primer include the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), the Rehabilitation Act (RHA), and the Fair Housing Act (FHA).

The 45 page article is available for download as a pdf from the Journal's website, here.

May 13, 2018 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Federal Statutes/Regulations, Housing, Other, State Statutes/Regulations | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, May 10, 2018

David Goodall Has Ended His Life

Earlier in the week we'd blogged about Australian David Goodall who, at 104, had decided he'd lived more than long enough and traveled to Switzerland to end his life.  The New York Times, among other news outlets, reported that he has done so. A Song Before Dying: David Goodall, 104, Australian Scientist, Ends His Life in Switzerland reports that "[o]n Thursday, Mr. Goodall died about 12.30 p.m. local time, according to Exit International, a right-to-die organization of which he had been a longtime member."  His decision has caught a lot of media attention, and the article relates that he held a final press conference the day before his death.

He was crystal clear about why he had chosen “the Swiss option.” Euthanasia and assisted dying are banned in Australia, though Victoria State has passed a law on assisted dying that goes into effect next year; it will apply only to terminally ill patients who have a life expectancy of no more than six months... He said he hoped his life story would “increase the pressure” on Australia to change its laws. “One wants to be free to choose his death when death is at the appropriate time,” Mr. Goodall said.

Mr. Goodall wanted no events marking his death. The article concludes that when he was asked "[h]ow would he like to be remembered? “As an instrument of freeing the elderly from the need to pursue their life irrespective,” he said at the news conference on Wednesday. .. At one point, he was asked what tune he would choose for his last song, and he said the final movement of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony. Then he began to sing, with verve and vigor... According to Mr. Nitschke, Mr. Goodall did end up choosing Beethoven, and he died the moment “Ode to Joy” concluded."

 

*updated to correct location

May 10, 2018 in Advance Directives/End-of-Life, Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Health Care/Long Term Care, International, Other | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, May 9, 2018

Do You Know the Difference Between Fraud & Financial Abuse?

Check out this new issue brief from the National Adult Protective Services Association (NAPSA) Research to Practice SeriesFraud versus financial abuse and the influence of social relationship, offers this summary

Elder financial exploitation, committed by individuals in positions of trust, and elder fraud, committed by predatory strangers, are two forms of financial victimization that target vulnerable older adults. The study presented in the webinar analyzes differences between fraud and financial exploitation APS victims in terms of their health, functional dependency, cognitive functioning, and social relationships.

In this mixed methods study, fifty-three financial exploitation and fraud cases were sampled from an elder abuse forensic center in California. Data include law enforcement and caseworker investigation reports, victim medical records, perpetrator demographic information, and forensic assessments of victim health and cognitive functioning.

The vast majority of fraud and financial exploitation victims performed poorly on tests of cognitive functioning and financial decision-making administered by a forensic neuropsychologist following the allegations. Based on retrospective record review, there were few significant differences in physical health and cognitive functioning at the time victims' assets were taken, although their social contexts were different. Fraud most often occurred when a vulnerable elder was solicited by a financial predator

in the absence of capable guardians. In other words, most fraud victims in the sample did not have trusted friends or family members assisting with financial decisions and providing care at the time the fraud perpetrators entered the picture. Fraud victims were significantly less likely to have children and also had fewer relatives nearby. In sum, fraud and financial exploitation victims had different family and friend structures that may create different opportunity structures for crime.

Social isolation was not only a potential risk factor for financial victimization, it was also a tactic of undue influence to further manipulate and control the victims. Some fraud victims in the sample developed close friendships and romantic relationships with the financial perpetrators, even in the cases where they communicated only by telephone. While these relationships were constructed to manipulate and deceive the victim, they felt authentic to the older person. Perpetrators often exploited the victim's need for companionship and began limiting and controlling their victims' social interactions to create a sense of powerlessness and emotional dependency.

May 9, 2018 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Other, Statistics | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, April 30, 2018

Bank at the US Post Office?

My brother (thanks big brother-I guess this means you read the blog-yay!) sent me an article published in The Hill with an interesting proposal!  Published on April 26, 2018, The poor need bank accounts, and USPS has the answer highlights a bill introduced by Senator Gillebrand  which would create "provide a public option in basic banking services through the U.S. Postal System."

Why, you may ask, propose that the USPS get into the banking business?  Well, because there is a "persistent problem of widespread financial exclusion, which means a household is either unbanked or underbanked. Recent data shows that 7 percent of households are simply unbanked since they lack a checking or savings account at a bank."  Consider the implications of not having a bank account. If you have to cash a check, where do  you go? "Instead, they have to rely on the predatory alternative financial services, such as payday lenders, check cashing services and the like." 

The article also introduces us to the concept of "underbanked" which means "19.9 percent of American households ... at some point during the year, they rely on high-cost alternative financial services to meet their financial needs. That leaves over one-in-four American households excluded from mainstream financial services."  Although these alternatives may work for those unbanked or underbanked, they are not without costs, both financial and otherwise.

The article discusses reasons why low-income households find themselves in this situation, including a focus on higher-profit activities and closing branches.  So this is where the USPS comes in under the bill.

The Gillibrand bill seeks to address the lack of universal access through the creation of a postal bank. An added bonus of this measure is that it regulates consumer financial protection abuses by making predatory lending practices uncompetitive.

The bill would allow all households to open accounts at the post office, with a $20,000 limit on checking and savings accounts. Further, the bill allows for small-dollar loans capped at $500 at one time.

The rates on these loans are reasonable, with the bill linking the interest rates to the 1-month Treasury bill constant maturity rate, though a low, fixed rate may be preferable.

Through offering financial services at post offices, the bill would provide much of the physical infrastructure needed to counteract the trend of bank-branch closings. The USPS already has the geographic infrastructure to support universal access: a post office in every ZIP code.

The article offers suggestions for services as well as pitfalls. Interesting concept.

April 30, 2018 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Federal Statutes/Regulations, Other | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, April 23, 2018

You Are Only as Old As You Feel!

You've heard the phrases such as "60 is the new 40." Now we learn there may be some truth to the thought that you feel younger than your chronological age.The Washington Post recently published this article, Cliches about only being as old as you feel are starting to have scientific backing.

The article focuses on research that indicates many folks who are older feel good about themselves and about the negative messages about aging that affect us all.  The article references "[o]ne study ... [that] found that as people get older, they consistently say they feel younger — much younger — than their actual age. Another study examining the attitudes of the offspring of centenarians concluded that the centenarians’ children — if they, too, were healthy and long-lived — have a strong sense of purpose and meaning to their lives, compared with the general population. Finally, there is evidence that positive attitudes about aging may reduce the risk of dementia, among the most dreaded consequences of aging."  Yet, we start being bombarded with negative messages about aging at a very young age. One expert noted  that kids even age 3 or 4 already have absorbed "the age stereotypes of their culture,” which it seems come from "many sources, ranging from stories to social media. Individuals of all ages can benefit from bolstering their positive images of aging.” Another expert quoted in the article explains that “[n]egative views about aging are communicated to us early in life, through media, books and movies, and what our friends and family tell us... [and that such] attitudes are present and pervasive already in childhood, so naturally it’s hard to enact meaningful change to these attitudes....”

Several studies are referenced in the article. The studies bear out the idea that folks who are older feel younger than their chronological ages, but as far as younger people's perceptions, they consider old to be a lower number than those who are old would offer. For example, one researcher offered that "teenagers and young adults equated turning 50 with hitting old age."

And we've all heard the saying about attitude is everything. It turns out those with positive views of aging help with reducing stress and decreasing chances of dementia. One research summarizes her findings: She "evaluated 4,765 older people — average age, 72 — who were free of dementia at the start of the study and followed them for four years. The participants answered a series of questions about their beliefs about aging [and the researchers] found [that] those who expressed more-positive age beliefs at baseline were less likely to develop dementia . . . than those who expressed more-negative age beliefs...."

So remember, the class is half-full and aging is not a bad thing!

April 23, 2018 in Cognitive Impairment, Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Health Care/Long Term Care, Other, Science, Statistics | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, April 20, 2018

It's 5 o'clock somewhere... Baby Boomers and Alcohol Consumption

Recently the Washington Post published an article comparing generational alcohol intake. Teenagers and college-age people drink less while this group pours another round opens with this observation "[e]xperts on alcohol abuse have found one demographic group that’s drinking at an alarming rate. Not teenagers. Not college-age people. It’s baby boomers." The first few paragraphs of the article focus on younger individuals and then turns to Boomers, noting that it's "been known for half a century is that baby boomers tend to like alcohol more than the “silent generation” that preceded them."

Consider this:

"Researchers see a steady rise in alcohol use and binge drinking — as well as what’s known as Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD), an umbrella term for mild, moderate and severe abuse of alcohol —  in the 65-plus demographic. Between 2005 and 2014, the percentage of older Americans who reported engaging in past-month binge drinking (defined as women consuming four or more drinks in about two hours, and men consuming five or more) increased from 12.5 percent to 14.9 percent ... [and] [t]he increase in drinking among older Americans is most pronounced among people with greater levels of education and income, and among women.... At continuing care communities, alcohol is typically available as a social lubricant for the majority of residents who haven't graduated to assisted living...."

according to one expert quoted in the article.

One thing that is implicated in this is the perception or impression that moderate alcohol consumption is healthy. "[M]any boomers have embraced the notion that moderate drinking is good for them, compared to abstaining. The evidence there is mixed. A number of studies have shown a reduction in heart attacks among moderate drinkers. But a new study published in the Lancet last week showed no overall improvement in life expectancy among people who had one drink a day compared to those who abstained, and a decrease in life expectancy with any additional drinking. The study's authors concluded that the reduction in heart attacks was offset by other health risks."

April 20, 2018 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Food and Drink, Health Care/Long Term Care, Other, Retirement, Science | Permalink

Wednesday, April 18, 2018

New Issue Brief from National Center on Law & Elder Rights

The National Center on Law & Elder Rights has released an issue brief, Drafting Advance Planning Documents to Reduce the Risk of Abuse or Exploitation.  The issue brief offers 4 key lessons:

  1. Extra care in the creation of advance care planning documents can reduce the risk of abuse and exploitation.
    2. Requiring accountability, additional checks and balances, and limited authority are drafting tools lawyers can utilize to limit risk of abuse.
    3. Attorneys should advise clients to be extra diligent when selecting the agent(s) named in advance planning documents.
    4. Authorizing revocation by third parties can help to limit the damage done by named agents who start to abuse or exploit the client. 

I was intrigued by #4-the idea of naming a third party who could step in.  The section, Five Safeguards to Consider Adding to a Financial POA discusses that among others.  Here's how the issue brief explains the third party revocation provision: "Grant a power to revoke the agent’s authority to a trusted third person. This is a serious power to give any third person, so it requires an exceptional level of trust and reliability in the third person. But, if the agent’s actions prove seriously out of line, this can be a last resort. Some powers of attorney also authorize law enforcement or adult protective services to revoke the authority of the agent if they believe abuse or exploitation is taking place." Sample language is also included for each of the 5 Safeguards.

The brief discusses selection of agents and drafting health care directives in addition to drafting POAs. Practice tips are included as well as case examples. The issue brief is available here.

To learn more about the corresponding webcast click here.  To download the PowerPoint for the webcast, click here.

April 18, 2018 in Advance Directives/End-of-Life, Cognitive Impairment, Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Health Care/Long Term Care, Other, Programs/CLEs, Property Management, State Statutes/Regulations, Webinars | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, April 11, 2018

2018 Alzheimer's Facts and Figures

The Alzheimer's Association has released their annual facts and figures report. 2018 Alzheimer's Disease Facts & Figures also includes a special report on the benefits (personal and financial) of early diagnosis.  Here are some highlights of topics covered in the report:

  • Brain changes that occur with Alzheimer’s disease …
  • Revised guidelines for diagnosing Alzheimer’s disease …
  • Number of Americans with Alzheimer’s dementia nationally … and for each state …
  • Proportion of women and men with Alzheimer’s and other dementias …
  • Lifetime risk for developing Alzheimer’s dementia …
  • Number of deaths due to Alzheimer’s disease nationally … and for each state … and death rates by age …
  • Number of family caregivers, hours of care provided, and economic value of unpaid care nationally and for each state …
  • The impact of caregiving on caregivers …
  • National cost of care for individuals with Alzheimer’s or other dementias, including costs paid by  Medicare and Medicaid and costs paid out of pocket …
  • Medicare payments for people with dementia compared with people without dementia
  • Benefits of earlier detection of Alzheimer's disease …
  • Cost savings of diagnosing during the earlier mild cognitive impairment stage rather than the dementia stage …

There is a lot of helpful information and statistics in the report. The chart showing the numbers of those with Alzheimer's in 2018 compared to the projections for 2025 is very useful. (Just fyi, my state is expected to have a 33.3% increase). Consider this from page 21 of the report:

“[B]etween 2018 and 2025 every state across the country is expected to experience an increase of at least 13 percent in the number of people with Alzheimer’s. These projected increases in the number of people with Alzheimer’s are due to projected increases in the population age 65 and older in these states. The West and Southeast are expected to experience the largest percentage increases in people with Alzheimer’s between 2018 and 2025. These increases will have a marked impact on states’ health care systems, as well as the Medicaid program, which covers the costs of long-term care and support for some older residents with dementia.”

Read this!

 

April 11, 2018 in Cognitive Impairment, Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Health Care/Long Term Care, Other, Science, Statistics | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, April 10, 2018

Right to Try Bill Passes House on Second Try

According to the New York Times, late last month, the House of Representatives passed the right to try bill on their second attempt. House Passes Bill That Would Give Patients Access to Experimental Drugs explains that "[s]upporters said the bill would give dying patients a chance to obtain potentially helpful prescription drugs without waiting for the completion of clinical trials or going through a process established by the Food and Drug Administration to allow the use of “investigational drugs” outside clinical trials." There were supporters as well as opponents of the bill. 

The House and Senate bills would establish a new pathway providing access to unapproved medicines for certain patients who had exhausted other treatment options. To qualify under the House bill, a patient would have to have some kind of terminal illness: a condition that is likely to cause death “within a matter of months” or “irreversible morbidity that is likely to lead to severely premature death.”

Nothing in the bill would require pharmaceutical companies to provide experimental drugs to patients who requested them. Drug manufacturers sometimes turn down requests because they have only a limited supply or they are concerned about legal and medical risks.]

To address such concerns, the legislation would shield drugmakers, doctors and hospitals from some of the legal risks of providing unapproved drugs to patients. Doctors and hospitals would generally be protected unless they engaged in gross negligence or willful, reckless or criminal misconduct.

April 10, 2018 in Advance Directives/End-of-Life, Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Federal Statutes/Regulations, Health Care/Long Term Care, Other, Science | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, April 8, 2018

Who Gets Your Stuff When You Have No Kids?

A while back we published a post about Swedish Death Cleaning and I'll hazard a guess that after you read that post, many of you went through your stuff and disposed of things.  So here's another thought-when you don't have kids, to whom do you leave your stuff?  The New York Times tackled that issue in this article, If You Don’t Have Children, What Do You Leave Behind?

The author's essay explains her dilemma as she puzzles through who of her relatives get what, and in what amount, offering her view that "wills are easier for parents because they have a natural push — the need to name guardians for their children and provide financially for them after they are gone. On the surface it’s about who gets your stuff, but it got me thinking about ways people without children create a legacy. Who will remember us?"

The author did a lot of homework, casting a wide net of inquiries and carefully considering her catch.  She discovered "patterns and creative thinking [and] saw a lot of worry, too, mostly about who will take care of us when we’re old. When it comes to legacy and relationships with young people, people start close to home. Nieces, nephews and godchildren came up in nearly every response. As did the idea of meaningful work. And that’s true for [the author]."

This is an interesting piece and I think it would be useful for our students to read. It will help remind them that estate planning is not a "one-size-fits-all" exercise.

Thanks to Professor Naomi Cahn for sending this our way.

 

April 8, 2018 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Estates and Trusts, Other, State Statutes/Regulations | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, April 6, 2018

AALS Aging & Law Section Call for Proposals

The Aging & Law Section of AALS has issued a call for papers for its meeting in January, 2019 in new Orleans as part of the 2019 AALS annual meeting. The program is being co-sponsored by the Family & Juvenile Law, Minority Groups, Trusts & Estates, and Women in Legal Education Sections.
The topic for the program (and papers) is The Legal Consequences of Living a Long Life: The Differential Impact on Marginalized Communities

Here's a brief description, prepared by Section Secretary Naomi Cahn.

Thanks to advances in health care people are living longer.  Longevity has legal consequences.  People can outlive their family, friends, and finances. Longevity has differing impacts for women, people of color, low-income people, and LGBT individuals. Statistically, women make less money than men and they live longer than men. People of color are less financially secure than Americans as a whole. In the United States, approximately 80 percent of long-term care for older people is provided by family members, such as spouses, children, and other relatives. This places an undue financial burden on low-income persons. LGBT individuals may face conscious and unconscious discrimination when seeking long-term care and other assistance, and they have historically formed various kinds of family structures.  This panel will explore the intersection of the legal system and longevity, examining systems that are in place or should be in place to help people plan for living longer. Topics might include: paying family caregivers, working conditions of nursing home assistants, and differential patterns of wealth accumulation. This call for paper seeks authors of published or unpublished papers that consider law and longevity. 

To be considered, submit a one-two page proposal by email to Naomi at ncahn@law.gwu.edu  Deadline is May 1, 2018. BTW, those accepted to present may also have their papers published in the Journal of Health Law and Policy at Cleveland State University.

Don't wait-submit your proposal!!!

April 6, 2018 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Other, Programs/CLEs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, April 1, 2018

Peeps and Pensions: Serious Litigation Ensues

Those ubiquitous peeps appear like clockwork on the shelves of grocers, drug stores and confectioners along with the chocolate Easter bunnies and those other candies destined for someone's Easter basket. An article last week in the Washington Post.  Trouble in candy land:How Peeps, pensions and a lawsuit threaten to upend the American retirement system discusses the issues regarding the company's pension coverage for workers.  The company participates in a multi-employer pension plan and offers current workers (who are members of a union) a traditional pension plan. The company wants to leave that system and offer new works a 401(k) without paying a $60 million fee imposed pursuant to federal law.  This $60 million fee does have a specific purpose: "to ensure future retirees’ benefits are covered, and if [the company] succeeds in escaping it, union officials fear the unprecedented ruling would prompt thousands of other firms to do the same. This chain reaction could divert workers and money at a time when new employees are seen as crucial to ensure ample funding for the wave of retiring baby boomers — putting payouts for millions of pensioners at risk."

The dispute resulted in a strike and, as is typical in a town where one company can mean so much, people taking both sides of the dispute.  Matters deteriorated and now there is a lawsuit from the company against the union, asking for compensation and claiming the strike was unlawful.  The suit will have far-reaching ramifications since multi-employer pension plans exist beyond this one:

In total, 10 million current and retired workers participate in multi-employer pensions, according to the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation. These pensions allow employees to move from one job to another within the same pension and carry their retirement benefits with them.... Many of these multi-employer pensions are on track to run out of money. If the pension runs out of money, retired workers might only get a small percent of the money they thought they had earned through decades of work.

There's a bit of a domino effect in these kind of pension plans, since, as the article notes, "[i]f one of the companies paying into the multi-employer plan falters, the other firms are left on the hook to pay even more to stabilize the fund."

Not sure how this will all come out in the end, but for now,  go enjoy your peeps!

April 1, 2018 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Food and Drink, Other | Permalink

Wednesday, March 21, 2018

World Elder Abuse Awareness Day is June 15, 2018

With World Elder Abuse Awareness Day just a few months away, it's time to think about any events your organization might offer.  According to the USC Center on Elder Mistreatment NCEA email, a microsite has been created  that offers suggestions, helpful hints, events and more. Want to take some kind of action? Check the information here for 13 ideas in a number of categories. Planning an event? List it there. It's never too early to start planning!  And let others know using #WEAAD.

March 21, 2018 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Health Care/Long Term Care, International, Other, Programs/CLEs | Permalink | Comments (0)