Monday, April 7, 2014

Mickey Rooney, tireless advocate against elder abuse, dead at age 93

Mickey Rooney, who died Sunday at age 93, will be remembered by many as among the last of a long gone Hollywood era. An actor from the time he was a baby, he was a Rooneymovie star in his teens, a frequent television performer in the early days of network drama and a character actor who in recent years was still performing .  He was, very late in life, an outspoken advocate on an issue that’s increasingly commonplace yet still so little addressed. Rest in peace, Mickey Rooney, champion against elder abuse. Three years ago, at age 90, Rooney spoke before a Senate Special Committee on Aging on the abuse he said he suffered at the hands of his adult stepson Christopher Aber, and about the special vulnerability of older Americans to physical intimidation, financial exploitation and emotional mistreatment. Rooney claimed Aber withheld his mail, medication and food, and made him a “prisoner in his own home,” saying, “My money was stolen from me, by someone close. My money was taken and misused."

Read more at Salon

 

April 7, 2014 in Other | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, April 3, 2014

Help Promote Older Americans Month in May 2014--Free Materials Available

Materials to Promote Older Americans Month 2014 Available

May is Older Americans Month. This year’s theme focuses on injury prevention: Safe Today. Healthy Tomorrow.

To help participating organizations promote their events, ACL has posted new materials for 2014 here: Older Americans Month

The toolkit includes facts about preventing falls and injuries, an activity guide, poster templates, logos, and tips for consumers.

April 3, 2014 in Other | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Monday, March 31, 2014

IRS warns of tax-related phone scam sweeping the nation

Via AARP:

A fast-moving phone scam called the largest of its kind is targeting taxpayers across the country. Victims have reported threats of license suspension, arrest and deportation.  What makes this timely scam so tricky? The scammers impersonate Internal Revenue Service (IRS) agents and demand payment for taxes owed, and often:

  • know the last four digits of the victim’s Social Security number;
  • make caller ID appear as if the IRS is calling;
  • send follow-up bogus IRS emails to support their scam; and
  • call a second time claiming to be the police or Department of Motor Vehicles, and caller ID again supports their claim.

The IRS usually contacts people by mail not by phone about unpaid taxes.

The IRS won’t ask for payment using a pre-paid debit card or wire transfer, nor will they involve law enforcement or immigration agencies.

WHAT TO DO:

If you or a family member receives one of these calls, your best bet is to hang up. But if you do get into a conversation, do not give anyone money or credit card information over the phone and don’t trust callers who use threats or insults to bully you.

NEXT STEPS:

Report the incident to the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration at 1-800-366-4484.

File a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission at www.ftc.gov.  Add "IRS Telephone Scam" to the comments in your complaint.

If you owe or think you owe federal taxes, call the IRS directly at 1-800-829-1040 to verify information.

For more information, visit www.irs.gov.

Please help spread the word about this tax season scam by sharing this email with your friends and family.

If you or someone you know has been a victim of identity theft or fraud, contact the AARP Foundation Fraud Fighter Center at 1-800-646-2283.

March 31, 2014 in Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Other | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, March 25, 2014

KFF: Summary of Medicare Provisions in the President’s Budget for Fiscal Year 2015

 

On March 4, 2014, the Office of Management and Budget released President Obama’s budget for fiscal year (FY) 2015, which includes provisions related to federal spending and revenues, including Medicare savings.  The President’s budget would use federal savings and revenues to reduce the deficit and replace sequestration of Medicare and other federal programs for 2015 through 2024.  This brief summarizes the Medicare provisions included in the President’s budget proposal for FY2015.

 

The President’s FY2015 budget would reduce Medicare spending by more than $400 billion between 2015 and 2024, accounting for about 25 percent of all reductions in federal spending included in the budget.  Most of the Medicare provisions in the FY2015 budget are similar to provisions that were included in the Administration’s FY2014 budget proposal.  The proposed Medicare spending reductions are projected to extend the solvency of the Medicare Hospital Insurance Trust Fund by approximately five years.

 

  • More than one-third (34%) of the proposed Medicare savings are due to reductions in payments for prescription drugs under Medicare Part B and Part D.  The single largest source of Medicare savings would require drug manufacturers to provide Medicaid rebates on prescriptions for Part D Low Income Subsidy enrollees, a proposal which was also included in the President’s FY2014 proposed budget.
  • One-third (33%) of the proposed Medicare savings are due to reductions in Medicare payments to providers, most of which are reduced payments to post-acute care providers (Figure 1).  The baseline of the proposed budget assumes no reduction in Medicare payments for physician services, relative to current levels, from 2015 through 2024, in contrast to the sustainable growth rate formula (SGR) under current law, which calls for significantly lower physician payments during this 10-year period.  The projected cost for adjusting the baseline for this period is $110 billion, plus additional amounts associated with eliminating cuts in 2014.
  • About 16 percent of the proposed Medicare savings are due to increases in beneficiary premiums, deductibles and cost-sharing.

Read more here.

 

March 25, 2014 in Health Care/Long Term Care, Medicare, Other | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, March 22, 2014

Benjamin Rose Institute on Aging--Call for nominations for annual Caregiving Award

The Benjamin Rose Institute on Aging (www.benrose.org) invites creative caregivers to apply for the fourth annual Innovation in Caregiving AwardUp to three award winners will each receive a commemorative plaque and a check for $1,000. Awards will be presented at BRIA’s annual conference in November, 2014. Applications for the award are available online at www.benrose.org/awardor by calling 216.791.8000. Deadline for applications is June 30, 2014.  
The Innovation in Caregiving Award recognizes adults (age 18 and over) who, in the course of caring for an adult aged 60 or over in a private home or a residential setting:
--invent a device or technique that solves a caregiving challenge, or          
--find a new application for an existing device or technique that supports caregiving and eases the burden on caregivers.
Last year’s award winners included Joseph Angelo, who developed Sparx Cards as a memory aid for people with dementia, and Renard Turner, whose Luvz Puzzles use shapes, colors and numbers to help people with cognitive issues engage in stimulating activity.  (View the winning 2013 entries and other past award winners here: www.benrose.org/award).
 
Applicants for the 2014 awards may be family caregivers, paid care providers, or support staff whose ingenuity and inventiveness in giving care is worthy of recognition and replication. The award criteria include:
--the innovativeness of the device, technique or new application,
--its usefulness,
--its potential for being adopted or duplicated by others, and
--its possibility for improving quality of care or quality of life, or any combination of those criteria.
The Innovation in Caregiving Award is made possible through a gift to the Benjamin Rose Institute on Aging by a former Board Member. The late Elizabeth H. (Betty) Rose created several devices that made it easier for caregivers to assist older adults. Her efforts resulted in improvements in care and increased comfort for those receiving care. Betty realized that caregivers are often creative problem solvers as well. She intended this award to recognize and celebrate the accomplishments of these individuals who serve on the frontlines of caregiving. 
The award is not meant for organizations or individuals who developed their device or technique with financial help through a business, grant or other outside support. It honors instead direct caregivers: family members, friends and those working in the human services field, such as nurses, therapists, and home care aides, who have on their own developed a procedure or device with special benefit.  
The Benjamin Rose Institute on Aging (www.benrose.org) is a national leader pursuing innovation in practice and policy to address the important issues of aging. As a champion for older adults, Benjamin Rose works to advance their health, independence and dignity. The organization has established itself as a trusted resource for people who counsel, care for and advocate on behalf of older adults. The state-of-the-art Conference Center at Benjamin Rose hosts educational programming that is responsive to the evolving demands of an aging population.

 

 

 

March 22, 2014 in Cognitive Impairment, Grant Deadlines/Awards, Other | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Friday, March 21, 2014

Faculty position available at University of Illinois at Chicago

The University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC), School of Public Health (SPH), Division of Community Health Sciences (CHS) and the UIC Center for Research on Health and Aging invite applications for a tenured faculty position at the Associate or Full Professor level. This position is the lead position in a Chancellor-sponsored cluster hire initiative entitled “Health Promotion for Racially and Ethnically Diverse Older Adults” and will be actively involved in recruiting four additional tenure track faculty specializing in related research.

In addition to holding a faculty appointment in Community Health Sciences, the successful candidate will assume a leadership role in the Center for Research on Health and Aging (CRHA) in the Institute for Health Research and Policy (IHRP). CRHA is the campus-wide focal point for research on aging at UIC.  Located in  IHRP, CRHA interacts with a distinguished group of researchers who address complex questions about population health challenges from an interdisciplinary perspective. CHRA seeks to understand and reduce racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic disparities in the prevalence and burdens of chronic disease among older adults. The Center has been home to three consecutively funded National Institute on Aging/NIH Roybal Centers for translation research and has been a national and international leader in the development, testing and translation of evidence-based health promotion programs for older adults.  The person we seek will be expected to continue this work, build on it and be a strong advocate for the Center. 

More information about this position here.

March 21, 2014 in Other | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, March 20, 2014

AgeUK presents great ad about aging

Christopher Lee, aka Dracula, narrates!  Be sure to scroll down to the bottom of the page for additional video interviews.

Check it out here...

 

Thanks, Preston Franzen, for bringing to my attention on the Center for Elder Justice and Policy FB page!

March 20, 2014 in Other | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, March 18, 2014

Job Opportunity: Medicaid Policy Analyst at Families USA

Families USA is a national nonprofit, non-partisan organization dedicated to the achievement of quality, affordable health care and coverage for all Americans. We bring the voice of consumers in federal and state health policy debates, with a strong focus on the needs of low-income and vulnerable populations. Families USA is seeking a Medicaid Policy Analyst who will provide strategic input into the development and assist with the implementation of the organization’s work on Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program. The Medicaid Policy Analyst will report to the Medicaid Program Director. We are looking for someone with a deep understanding of the Medicaid and CHIP programs, the ability to write about technical policy issues in an accessible manner, and excellent analytical skills.

Responsibilities

  • Produce content related to Medicaid and CHIP, including but not limited to: reports, issue briefs, fact sheets, technical analyses, emails, blogs, webinars and other materials.
  • Provide technical assistance and strategic guidance to state and national health care advocates in conjunction with other Families USA staff.
  • Follow and report on emerging policy and political issues on Medicaid and CHIP and recommend appropriate organizational response.
  • Read and analyze federal regulations and guidance and write comments, sometimes in collaboration with other colleagues.
  • Collaborate with colleagues to incorporate health equity into organization’s Medicaid and CHIP work.
  • Help develop messaging, field press calls, and make public presentations on Medicaid and CHIP issues.
  • Represent the organization at national coalition tables on Medicaid and CHIP issues.

An ideal applicant would possess these qualifications

  • At least three to five years experience working on the Medicaid or CHIP program.
  • Strong understanding of Medicaid and CHIP and how the two programs relate to the Affordable Care Act.
  • Strong understanding of federal and state rules governing Medicaid, with a particular focus on eligibility, enrollment, and financing.
  • Excellent analytical skills.
  • Excellent communication skills—both oral and written, including the ability to write about technical policy issues in an accessible manner.
  • Strong organizational skills and an ability to work on multiple projects at the same time.
  • Ability to collaborate with other staff to complete a project.
  • Commitment to social justice.
  • Some travel for presentations, training, and consultations with state and local advocates will be required.

How to Apply 

Send a cover letter and resume by email to careers(at)familiesusa.org and include “Medicaid Policy Analyst” in the subject line. The salary will be commensurate with experience. Families USA offers a generous benefits package, including excellent health insurance, life and long-term disability insurance benefits, and generous vacation, sick leave, and holiday schedules. Families USA is an equal opportunity employer.

March 18, 2014 in Medicaid, Other | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, March 15, 2014

HUD Announces $120 Million for People with Disabilities

To help prevent thousands of people with disabilities from experiencing homelessness or unnecessary institutionalization, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development announced about $120 million in funding for state housing agencies to provide long-term rental assistance. Developed in partnership with HHS, applications for the Section 811 PRA are due May 5, 2014.

The program reinforces the guiding principles of the Americans with Disabilities Act and the landmark 1999 Supreme Court ruling in Olmstead v. L.C., which require state and local governments to provide services in the most integrated settings appropriate to meet the needs of individuals with disabilities. Read the News Release or Notice of Funding Availability for details.

March 15, 2014 in Grant Deadlines/Awards, Housing, Other | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Friday, March 14, 2014

March 29: DD Aware Day

March is Developmental Disabilities Awareness Month and to mark the occasion, The Arc is inviting everyone with intellectual and developmental disabilities to make plans to go out somewhere in public on Saturday, March 29 to break down social barriers, dispel myths and raise awareness.

Please share this message and encourage those you know with I/DD, their colleagues, friends and families to make plans to hit the movies, the park, a local shopping center or restaurant for a day out and maybe spark some conversation in the process.T

Check the landing page on thearc.org with more information and launch an email and social media campaign to encourage folks to join in. Plus, we have a couple of guest bloggers lined up for March to share their personal experiences on the topic of social barriers on The Arc’s blog (blog.thearc.org). Spread the word using the hashtag #DDAware on social media during the month of March. And, follow us  on Facebook or Twitter where we will be sharing photos and stories from everyone’s March 29 activities.

March 14, 2014 in Cognitive Impairment, Discrimination, Other | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, March 12, 2014

February Bifocal Now Available On-Line

The February issue of Bifocal, e-Journal of the ABA Commission on Law and Aging is now available for pdf download.  The issue is also available online on the Bifocal homepage.

What's inside this issue?

Cover Article
Aging in the 21st Century
by Marcos Acle Mautone
The world is facing an unprecedented demographic shift.

Features
The Dual Eligible Demonstration
by Fay Gordon
If everything goes as planned, by January 1, 2015, hundreds of thousands of individuals could be enrolled in new delivery systems where combined Medicare and Medicaid services are provided through managed care plans. Of course, nothing ever happens exactly as planned. However, nine states are on tap to implement a dual eligible demonstration within the next year, making this a critical time in both planning and implementation of the new systems.

Defining Undue Influence
by Mary Joy Quinn
Understanding undue influence, dissecting it, defining it, and understanding the term, has proven elusive in social service and legal settings.

Using Mediation to Find Solutions
by Erica Wood
In North Carolina, a Medicaid appeal request goes to the Office of Administrative Hearings, where it is heard by an administrative law judge. This Office does not hear Medicaid eligibility cases, only appeals. Even so, the Office processed close to 13,000 recipient appeals last year. But North Carolina has found a unique approach to appeals that is timely and allows beneficiaries to state their case directly to the Department of Medical Assistance Services: mediation.

The Work of a Volunteer Fiduciary
by Randy Feliciano and Barbara K. Green
Although there are a number of public guardianship programs in the state of Virginia that are authorized to serve a specific number of clients, the beauty of Arlington’s program is that it makes a tremendous impact in meeting the needs of incapacitated individuals through the power of volunteerism.

The Physician Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment (POLST) Legislative Guide
The American Bar Association's Commission on Law and Aging collaborated with the National POLST Paradigm Task Force (NPPTF) and a team of legal experts to produce the POLST Legislative Guide, a free publication released in February 2014, for states engaged in the development of Physician Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment (POLST) programs.

Book Excerpt: Ethics in the Practice of Elder Law
by Roberta K. Flowers and Rebecca C. Morgan
This book features a useful and practical approach to guiding an attorney new to elder law through potential ethical issues. With the inclusion of practitioner checklists, the book provides a framework for analyzing the day-to-day issues that elder law attorneys encounter.

Borchard Foundation Center on Law & Aging 2014-2015 Fellowship in Law & Aging
The Borchard Fellowship in Law & Aging affords three law school graduates interested in a career in law and aging the opportunity to pursue their research and professional interests for one year.

World Congress on Adult Guardianship
Anyone who is involved with guardianship regularly faces challenges at some point. The World Congresses present shared problems from new perspectives and offer ideas and solutions from multiple viewpoints, cultures and guardianship systems.

Inside the Commission
Commission Interns
The Commission's robust internship program hosts students year-round in Washington, DC. Here, we profile our two Fall interns.

Engage Your Community!
Don't forget to plan for: National Health Decisions Day (April 16), Law Day (May 1), and Older Americans Month (May)

Commission Publication: Checklist for an Elder-Friendly Law Office
By complying with the American with Disabilities Act (ADA) Accessibility Guidelines and making the other practical design decisions highlighted in this 22-page publication, you can improve an older client's experience in your office.

Event and CLE Update
Upcoming CLE

New National Aging and Law Conference
This October 16-17, the Commission on Law and Aging will sponsor the New National Aging and Law Conference in Washington, DC. This year's conference theme will be: 50th Anniversary of the War on Poverty: Progress & Challenges for the Future.

Upcoming CLE: Health Care Decision-Making and the “F” Word—Futility
Recent cases involving brain dead patients and resulting disputes over continuing organ-sustaining treatments have reignited debate over the appropriate use of medical technologies. The family of Jahi McMath in Oakland, CA, fought to keep their daughter connected to a ventilator, while a hospital in Fort Worth, TX, sought to keep Marlise Muñoz, fourteen weeks pregnant, on a ventilator over the objection of her husband and family. For terminally ill patients who are not brain dead, a family's desire to "do everything possible" sometimes leads to insisting on medical interventions that medical professionals may deem inappropriate or "futile."

To subscribe to Bifocal or to submit news items or a manuscript for consideration, contact editor Andrea Amato.

March 12, 2014 in Other | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, March 6, 2014

Penn State offers post-doc in applied gerontology

The Study of Healthy Aging & Applied Research Programs (SHAARP) lab within the Center for Healthy Aging at Penn State is pleased to offer a postdoctoral position for an emerging scholar.  The SHAARP lab is led by Dr. Lesley Ross and is primarily focused on (1) cognitive, sensory, and physical functioning predictors of everyday functioning in older adults and (2) interventions to maintain everyday functioning in older adults. This lab is involved in several ongoing and recently completed longitudinal and intervention-based studies including the Advanced Cognitive Training for Independent and Vital Elderly (ACTIVE), the Cognitive and Physical Exercise Study (CAPES), the Senior and Adolescent Driving Study (SANDS), and the Maryland Driving Study.  Studies conducted within the SHAARP lab are multidisciplinary and include imaging data (MRI/fMRI), genetic biomarkers, neuropsychological and cognitive data, sensory and physical functioning data, mental health and lifestyle data, and detailed everyday functioning data (such as driving and mobility).  Primary responsibilities will include data management and analysis; preparation of manuscripts, grant proposals, and conference presentations; and participation in interdisciplinary research groups that design new studies. The fellow will have opportunities to publish, and access to exceptional resources to facilitate his or her independent research.  Additional opportunities to work with other Center for Healthy Aging faculty may also be available.

Qualified individuals will have a Ph.D. in the social, behavioral or health sciences; relevant research experience; strong statistical and writing skills; and the capacity to work closely with others. Additional skills that are highly desirable, but not required, are a background in cognitive aging, genetic biomarkers, and imaging. The appointment will be for one year, with likely funding for at least one additional year depending on productivity. The position provides salary and benefits consistent with those for NIH postdoctoral fellows.  To apply, please send (1) a letter of application indicating research interests, career goals, and experience; (2) a curriculum vita; and (3) three letters of professional reference to Ann Shuey via email ([email protected]) or post at The Center for Healthy Aging, 422 Biobehavioral Health Building, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802. Review of applications will begin immediately and continue until the position is filled.
 
 
 

March 6, 2014 in Grant Deadlines/Awards, Other, Science | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Friday, February 14, 2014

Book--Global Aging: Comparative Perspectives on Aging and the Life Course

Global Aging:  Comparative Perspectives on Aging and the Life Course (Springer 2014)

Suzanne R. Kunkel, PhD
J. Scott Brown, PhD
Frank J. Whittington, PhD

328 pp., Softcover

ISBN-13: 9780826105462

 

$85.00

Summary:  Using a comparative, cross-national perspective, Global Aging: Comparative Perspectives on Aging and the Life Course explores the major topics in social gerontology worldwide and the demands that the aging population places on a society.

This comprehensive and timely guide includes contributions from international gerontology scholars and illustrates both universal and socioculturally unique aspects of aging across nations. It is organized thematically for ease of use and includes an abundance of photographs and illustrations to highlight key points.

Key features:

  • Discussions on various nations' policies and programs designed to meet the unique needs of an older population
  • An essay on pension and income maintenance policies and programs
  • An analysis of the role of local and national governments, as well as non-governmental organizations, in serving older adults
  • Case studies on specific aspects of aging: family life, caregiving, policies and politics, health and long-term care, and work and retirement
  • The most current demographic data on aging around the world

 Ed:  Sounds like a good resource!

February 14, 2014 in Other | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, February 12, 2014

President will sign Executive Order raising minimum wage for government contracts--including for those with disabilities

FACT SHEET - Opportunity For All: Rewarding Hard Work

 

Raising the Minimum Wage through Executive Order to $10.10 for Federal Contract Workers

& Calling on Congress to Finish the Job for All Workers by Passing the Harkin-Miller Bill

 

Today, continuing to fulfill his promise to make 2014 a year of action, the President will sign an Executive Order to raise the minimum wage to $10.10 for federal contract workers.

 

The Executive Order the President will sign today will benefit hundreds of thousands of people working under contracts with the federal government who are making less than $10.10 an hour. It will also improve the value that taxpayers are getting from the federal government’s investment. Studies show that boosting low wages will reduce turnover and absenteeism, while also boosting morale and improving the incentives for workers, leading to higher productivity overall. These gains improve the quality and efficiency of services provided to the government.

 

In his State of the Union Address, President Obama pledged to both take executive action wherever he can and work with Congress to increase opportunity for all Americans. Consistent with that pledge, the President will continue to work with Congress to finish the job to raise the minimum wage for all Americans and pass the Harkin-Miller bill so that all workers can be paid at least a $10.10 minimum wage. 

 

Details of the Executive Order

 

Ø  The Executive Order will raise the minimum wage to $10.10 effective for new contracts beginning January 1, 2015.   The higher wage will apply to new contracts and replacements for expiring contracts.  Boosting wages will lower turnover and absenteeism, and increase morale and productivity overall. Raising wages for those at the bottom will improve the quality and efficiency of services provided to the government.

Ø  Benefits hundreds of thousands of hardworking Americans. There are hundreds of thousands of people working under contracts with the federal government to provide services or construction who are currently making less than $10.10 an hour.  Some examples of the hardworking people who would see their wages go up under this Executive Order include nursing assistants providing care to our veterans at nursing homes, concessions workers in National Parks, people serving food to our troops, and individuals with disabilities working to maintain the grounds on military bases.

Ø  Includes an increase in the tipped minimum wage.  This executive order also includes provisions to make sure that tipped workers earn at least $10.10 overall, through a combination of tips and an employer contribution.  Employers are currently required to pay a minimum base wage of $2.13 per hour, a base that has remained unchanged for over twenty years, and if a worker’s tips do not add up to the minimum wage, the employer must make up the difference. Under the Executive Order, employers are required to ensure that tipped workers earn at least $10.10 an hour.  The Executive Order requires that employers pay a minimum base wage of $4.90 for new contracts and replacements for expiring contracts put out for bid after January 1, 2015.  That amount increases by 95 cents per year until it reaches 70 percent of the regular minimum wage, and if a worker’s tips do not add up to at least $10.10, the employer will be required to pay the difference.   

Ø  Covers individuals with disabilities.  Under current law, workers whose productivity is affected because of their disabilities may be paid less than the wage paid to others doing the same job under certain specialized certificate programs. Under this Executive Order, all individuals working under service or concessions contracts with the federal government will be covered by the same $10.10 per hour minimum wage protections.   

Ø  Improves value for the federal government and taxpayers.  One study showed that when Maryland passed its living wage law for companies contracting with the state, there was an increase in the number of contractors bidding and higher competition can help ensure better quality. The increase will take effect for new contracts and replacements for expiring contracts put out for bid after the effective date of the order, so contractors will have time to prepare and price their bids accordingly.

 

More info here.

February 12, 2014 in Discrimination, Federal Statutes/Regulations, Other | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, February 11, 2014

Hollywood star Shirley Temple dies

Via the BBC:

ALeqM5jCss2Qnob2rCkxkmWNb-8Q_KaZEgFormer Hollywood child star Shirley Temple has died at the age of 85.  With her adorable charm and blonde curls, she was one of the most popular stars of the 1930s, in hit movies like Bright Eyes and Stand Up and Cheer.  After retiring from films in 1950 at the age of 21, Temple returned to the spotlight as a politician and diplomat.  She died on Monday at home in Woodside, California, from natural causes. "She was surrounded by her family and caregivers," a statement said.  Born in 1928, Temple soon became a major star after getting her first film role at the age of three.

Read more here.

February 11, 2014 in Other, Television | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Friday, January 31, 2014

Call for applications: NIH's Butler-William Scholars Program 2014

Butler-Williams Scholars Program 2014
Monday, August 4, 2014 to Friday, August 8, 2014

Location:
NIH Campus Bethesda, MD


Meeting Description

The 2014 Butler-Williams Scholars Program (formerly the Summer Institute on Aging Research) includes lectures, seminars, and small group discussions in research design relative to aging, including issues relevant to aging of ethnic and racial minorities. Lectures will cover topics in research on aging, including: the biology of aging; genetics and Alzheimer’s disease; and health, behavior, and aging. Discussion sessions will focus on methodological approaches and interventions. The program also will include consultation on the development of research interests and advice on preparing and submitting research grant applications to NIA.

The B-W Scholars Program is sponsored by NIA with support from the National Hartford Centers of Gerontological Nursing Excellence.


Who Should Apply?

Applications will be accepted from emerging researchers, including those who may have had limited involvement in research on aging. The applicant must be a U.S. citizen, noncitizen national, or lawfully admitted for permanent residence. As an offering of the NIA Office of Special Populations, researchers with an interest in health disparities research are encouraged to apply. Applicants from diverse backgrounds, including individuals from underrepresented racial and ethnic groups, individuals with disabilities and women are always encouraged to apply for NIH support. 25 to 30 participants will be selected.

For more information, and to apply, go here.


http://www.nia.nih.gov/about/events/2013/butler-williams-scholars-program-2014#sthash.ZS3fNfSC.dpuf

Butler-Williams Scholars Program 2014

Monday, August 4, 2014 to Friday, August 8, 2014
 
Location: 
NIH Campus Bethesda, MD

Meeting Description

The 2014 Butler-Williams Scholars Program (formerly the Summer Institute on Aging Research) includes lectures, seminars, and small group discussions in research design relative to aging, including issues relevant to aging of ethnic and racial minorities. Lectures will cover topics in research on aging, including: the biology of aging; genetics and Alzheimer’s disease; and health, behavior, and aging. Discussion sessions will focus on methodological approaches and interventions. The program also will include consultation on the development of research interests and advice on preparing and submitting research grant applications to NIA.

The B-W Scholars Program is sponsored by NIA with support from the National Hartford Centers of Gerontological Nursing Excellence.

Who Should Apply?

Applications will be accepted from emerging researchers, including those who may have had limited involvement in research on aging. The applicant must be a U.S. citizen, noncitizen national, or lawfully admitted for permanent residence. As an offering of the NIA Office of Special Populations, researchers with an interest in health disparities research are encouraged to apply. Applicants from diverse backgrounds, including individuals from underrepresented racial and ethnic groups, individuals with disabilities and women are always encouraged to apply for NIH support. 25 to 30 participants will be selected based on:

- See more at: http://www.nia.nih.gov/about/events/2013/butler-williams-scholars-program-2014#sthash.ZS3fNfSC.dpuf

January 31, 2014 in Health Care/Long Term Care, Other, Programs/CLEs | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, January 30, 2014

Spotlight on University of Hawaii Law's James Pietsch

Last week I posted our first Elder Law Prof "Spotlight."  We're using these opportunities to shine the light on faculty members in the U.S. and Canada who teach "law and aging" courses.  We're looking to go beyond profiles posted on law school websites.

Once again, we've found a great target for our spotlight with James Pietsch at the University of Hawaii's William S. Richardson School of Law.  As this photo suggests, Jim has unique experience in "jumping in with both feet" to help those in need. James Pietsch University of Hawaii 

Jim teaches interdisciplinary courses such as "Law, Aging and Medicine" and "HealthLaw: Bioethics" for students at the law school, the medical school, the school of nursing, and also for graduate students in social work, all at the University of Hawaii. His teaching is uniquely rooted in his military service, beginning with his active duty in the U.S. Army Medical Service Corps and the JAG Corps.  He served  tours of duty in Korea, D.C. and Hawaii. 

After his full-time military service, Jim became a directing attorney at the Honolulu Elder Law Unit for Legal Aid. That role evolved and culminated in creation of the University of Hawaii Elder Law Program,  with the appropriate -- and catchy -- acronym of UHELP. Professor Pietsch supervises clinical students who provide direct legal services on a year-round basis. Jim reports he is just one part of a great team at UHELP and the clinics. 

Jim continues to serve in the Army Reserves.  In 2007, during the surge in Iraq, Professor Pietsch was the Special Advisor to the Law and Order Task Force of the Multi-National Force in Iraq.  He also served as the Rule of Law Advisor to two reconstruction teams in Iraq.  Bringing to bear all of his experiences in the military, education and direct legal services, he helped to establish a legal aid clinic for detainees in Iraq, working with the Iraqi Bar Association.  Jim reports he was able to use the University of Hawaii's Elder Law Clinic materials in creating an operational manual for the Iraqi Clinic. He also consulted with the US AID-sponsored Access to Justice Project to help establish legal aid clinics in Iraq with a goal of providing legal assistance to underserved populations throughout the country, including ethnic and religious minority groups.

Jim Pietsch Closeup

As you might imagine, given the experience and leadership skills of Jim Pietsch, the University of Hawaii's clinics have a special focus on veterans.  In November 2013, Jim, Stetson Law Professor Becky Morgan and others teamed up to host an International Elder Law "Veterans Focus" Conference in Hawaii, coinciding, appropriately enough, with Veterans Day. It also appears that Jim has a great sense of humor -- as demonstrated by the tradition of his University's "Nite of the Living Will" -- an annual program at Halloween, where faculty and students, often in costume, assist members of the public in learning more about advance health care directives and help them execute appropriate documents.

Mahalo, Jim, for your inspiring work!

January 30, 2014 in Other | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, January 29, 2014

Not Elder Law: Bird watchers around the world needed to gather crucial data

                                                                
DuckFrom Afghanistan to Zimbabwe, bird watchers from more than 100 countries are expected to participate in the 17th annual Great Backyard Bird Count (GBBC), February 14–17, 2014. Anyone anywhere in the world can count birds for at least 15 minutes on one or more days of the count and enter their sightings at www.BirdCount.org. The information gathered by tens of thousands of volunteers helps track the health of bird populations at a scale that would not otherwise be possible. The GBBC is a joint project of the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the National Audubon Society with partner Bird Studies Canada.

Read the full press release

 

January 29, 2014 in Other, Science, Travel | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, January 16, 2014

"Don't Waste Good Money on Oak Caskets and Brass Handles...."

Hayley is investigating DIY funerals. Who is Hayley?  Of course, she's a character on the British night-time soap opera, Coronation Street (a/k/a "Corrie"), that's been running continuously in the U.K. since 1960.  Hayley doesn't want to "waste good money on oak caskets and brass handles. "  

Here's an essay from the Irish Times, inspired both by the fictional Corrie debate, and preferences expressed by the County Down author's real-life partner, including a discussion of an Irish tradition, the wake. 

I especially like the line from the essay, "She was waked in her own home."   

Thank you, Una Lynch, for sending the link from across the Atlantic!

January 16, 2014 in Consumer Information, Ethical Issues, Other | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Sunday, January 12, 2014

The life and times of an aging superhero...

I came across this today and just had to post it...

Via Colassal:


Englund-10In his ongoing series of photorealistic oil paintings called the Aging Superhero, Swedish artist Andreas Englund takes us into the candidly humorous life of an anonymous superhero who has probably seen better days. Though he still puts up a tough fight, the wear and tear of battling crime has taken its toll on this elderly action figure.

 

View more of Englund's paintings at Colassal.

January 12, 2014 in Other | Permalink | TrackBack (0)