Monday, February 8, 2016

Will Avvo Fixed-Fee Legal Services Help or Hurt the Practice of "Elder Law"?

As described recently by the ABA Journal, Avvo, founded in Seattle by a self-described "tech-savvy lawyer,"  Mark Britton,  in order "to make legal easier and help people find a lawyer," is expanding its offerings of "fixed-fee, limited-scope" legal services.  The ABA Journal reports:

Avvo first got into the business of offering legal advice last year when it launched Avvo Advisor, a service that provides on-demand legal advice by phone for a fixed fee of $39 for 15 minutes. With this new service, Avvo will determine the types of services to be provided and the prices. Attorneys who sign up will be able to select which services they want to offer. When a client buys a service, Avvo sends the client’s information to the attorney. The attorney then contacts the client directly and completes the service.

 

Clients will be able to choose the attorney they want from a list of those within their geographic area who have registered to participate. Clients pay the full price for the service up front.

 

After the service is completed, Avvo sends the attorney the full legal fee, paid once a month for fees earned the prior month. As a separate transaction, the attorney pays Avvo a per-service marketing fee. This is done as a separate transaction to avoid fee-splitting, according to Avvo. Attorneys pay nothing to participate except for the per-case marketing fee.

Some practitioners undoubtedly are nervous about the effects of this format, expressing concern about quality and "price-point" effects.  Others see this as an option for the known, huge number of low and modest income persons, who never communicate with attorneys, for a host of reasons including concerns about price.  

Will older clients and their families, facing a range of transactions that could benefit from legal assistance, from POAs to contracts for care, use Avvo?  

 

February 8, 2016 in Consumer Information, Ethical Issues, Legal Practice/Practice Management | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, January 3, 2016

Webinar: "What It Really Means to Practice Elder Law"

ElderCounsel CEO Valerie Peterson and practitioner Cary Moss are offering what looks to be a free 30 minute webinar on Wednesday, January 6 on "Debunking Myths: What It Really Means to Practice Elder Law."

Intriguing and perhaps a good introductory assignment for law students taking an elder law course?  

January 3, 2016 in Legal Practice/Practice Management | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, December 28, 2015

Bad Behavior by so-called "Professionals"

Sad news about manipulation by attorneys of older clients, and about specific individuals who have been sanctioned recently for their abuse:

  • Florida Supreme Court "permanently disbarred" Cape Coral Florida attorney William Edy for theft from his clients.  Before being charged with second degree grant theft from clients, Edy apparently held himself out as a trustworthy elder law attorney, writing a newspaper column and even commenting on financial abuse of the elderly.
  • New Jersey Supreme Court suspended New Jersey attorney William Torre for one year, while sanctioning his conduct in "borrowing" money from a "vulnerable" 86 year old client, acting in his own self-interest and failing to repay her in a timely and appropriate manner.   

The New Jersey court, writing unanimously, observed:

The Court considers respondent’s conduct against the backdrop of the serious and growing problem of elder abuse. As the population ages, and more people suffer health problems, it is not uncommon for family members to seek the appointment of a guardian to oversee the finances of an incapacitated loved one. Others, like M.D., turn to family or professionals for help and execute powers of attorney in favor of a relative, friend, or trusted lawyer. In those situations, the vast majority of attorneys perform honorably and act in a manner consistent with the highest ethical standards. But regrettably, as more seniors have needed help to manage their affairs, allegations of physical and financial abuse have also increased.

In a News-Press article about the Florida disbarment,  Professor Geoffrey Hazard (Emeritus at Penn Law, Southern California Law and Yale Law) is quoted as noting that places with large numbers of retirees, such as Southern California, Florida and Arizona, have a "greater risk of attorney misbehavior," in part because of isolation from children and friends with whom they can discuss situations. 

Along the same lines of financial misconduct by "professionals," a Texas psychiatrist, Dr. Robert Hadley Gross, was recently sentenced to "nearly six years in prison" for submitting false claims for services to residents at a nursing home, individuals who were shown to be either dead or discharged. 

December 28, 2015 in Crimes, Current Affairs, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Ethical Issues, Legal Practice/Practice Management, Property Management, State Cases | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, December 21, 2015

If Your Clients are Mostly "Older," Are You Practicing Elder Law?

The November/December 2015 issue of the ABA magazine (Volume 32, Issue 2) GPSOLO, the publication for members of the Solo, Small Firm and General Practice division of the American Bar Association, is devoted to Elder Law. The issue can be found on-line (and viewing does not seem to be restricted to division members!).  The articles are also available on Westlaw.

Articles include:

  • How to Make Money Practicing Elder Law, by Andrea G. Van Leesten, who practices in California and who is the 2015-16 Diversity Director for the Division;
  • Representing Elder Physical Abuse Victims,  by California practitioner Mark Redmond, who has "focused primarily on representation of elders in cases of physical and financial abuse for the last 15 years;" 
  • Advocating for Elders Suffering Financial Abuse and Exploitation, by Nicole Le Hudson, who focuses her San Diego practice on disability and elder law and who is a "member of the court-appointed attorney panel for conservatorships;"
  • The State of Age Discrimination Law: An Update, by Brian McCaffrey, who focuses his New York practice on employment litigation;
  • Estate Planning for Old Age and Incapacity, by Sheila-Marie Finkelstein, who practices estate planning in Irvine, California; 
  • Counseling Clients about Health Care Toward the End of Life, by Sally Balch Hurme (who I just discovered while reading her article recently retired from 23 years of consumer advocacy with AARP -- but who is still clearly very active in elder law, thank goodness!); 
  • How to Fund Long-Term Care Without Medicaid, by Eileen Walsh, from Louisville,  and I have to admit I read her article first - she explores Medicare, insurance, VA benefits and reverse mortgage options); and 
  • What Every Lawyer Needs to Know About Planning for Retirement, by Cynthia Sharp who "works with motivated lawyers seeking to generate additional income."   

Charlie Sabatino brings to bear his 30 years of experience and careful thought to the question of whether having older clients automatically means you are practicing "elder law," in his column "GP Mentor: When Does Serving Older Clients Become Elder Law?"  Hint?  The answer may depend on whether you are working in the best interests of the senior.

In addition, there is a great Resource Guide of recent texts on Elder Law  and the Division Chair's essay on recognizing Elder Abuse. PLUS, there's a detailed shoppers's guide to cameras, mobile phones ans more in the 2015 Tech Gift Guide -- for those of you still searching for gift ideas for your favorite elder law attorney!  

December 21, 2015 in Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Estates and Trusts, Health Care/Long Term Care, Housing, Legal Practice/Practice Management, Retirement | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, December 17, 2015

Is a Court-Appointed Guardianship, Using Paid, Private Guardian, "Worse Than Prison"? Latest from Nevada

As we've reported several times over the course of the last year, concerns about cost, misuse of authority, and lack of appropriate oversight of court-appointed guardians for adults in Clark County (Las Vegas), Nevada, have lead to a state-wide inquiry into how better to protect the civil rights of alleged incapacitated persons.  According to news reports recent proceedings before the Nevada Supreme Court Guardianship Commission, one judge described past neglect of the alleged incapacitated individual's rights as being "worse than being sent to prison."

A frequent concern raised by family members has been the cost of court-appointed guardians, particularly for individuals or family members who disagree with either the need for a guardianship or the scope of the guardian's powers over the individual or the individual's assets.  During the most recent proceedings addressing potential solutions, judges and others argued that a solution to some of the abuses was court-appointment of a lawyer at the outset of any guardianship proceeding to represent the interests of the individual.  Thus, there is some irony, that an additional layer of potential costs -- the cost of the appointed counsel -- would be argued as part of the solution.  On the other hand, limiting the amount of money such an attorney can charge (whether paid from the individual's estate or from public funds), can have the practical effect of what might be described as "de minimus" representation. 

The Nevada proceedings have attracted considerable attention from media nationally -- and from family advocates challenging court-supervised guardianships in other states and who are sharing information about problems and potential solutions. My thanks to Rick Black for sharing news from Nevada.

December 17, 2015 in Cognitive Impairment, Current Affairs, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Estates and Trusts, Ethical Issues, Legal Practice/Practice Management, State Statutes/Regulations | Permalink | Comments (4)

Monday, December 14, 2015

When a Caring Family Tradition Comes Full Circle...

I have often been struck by how frequently attorneys I know began working in elder law after their personal struggles to find resources to help an aging member of their own family.  A slightly different family-inspired path is behind the story of attorney Joy Solomon.  She at first resisted.

In the midst of my raging adolescence in 1979, my mother was devoting most of her time to a Jewish nursing home in Baltimore where she was the board president.

 

I would come home after school, make instant mashed potatoes, settle into the comfort of our gray velour sofa and watch “General Hospital,” enraptured. Family dinner often included stories about Mom’s afternoon with the old people. In her mind, the elderly were to be revered as the bearers of history, lives lived and lessons learned; in my self-centered, adolescent thinking, old people were fragile, needy and dying. I felt more connected to soap stars like Luke and Laura than to aged Jewish grandmothers. I told myself that I’d never end up working in a nursing home like her. No way....

To continue reading how Joy found her mission and is now a part of the team at the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Center for Elder Abuse Prevention at the Hebrew Home in Riverdale, the Bronx, read Coming Full Circle to Help Her Elders, from the New York Times. 

Special thanks to Karen Miller, a former administrative law judge from New York, for sharing this story.

December 14, 2015 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Ethical Issues, Legal Practice/Practice Management | Permalink

Thursday, December 10, 2015

ALI-CLE: Hot Topics in Estate, Trust & Conservatorship Litigation

While researching potential fact patterns to use in my Wills, Trusts and Estate exam (which the students have now taken, although I remain in the Valley of Doom, for those grading essay exams), I came across a recent American Law Institute-CLE course with a very useful outline of "hot" topics in estate, trust and conservator litigation, prepared by Los Angeles attorneys Terrence Franklin and Robert Sacks.  Also available on Westlaw as SW037 ALI-CLE 923, from June 2015, their list of hot topics includes:

  • Legal Standards for Lack of Mental Capacity: contrasting the standards used for assessment of capacity to make wills and revocable trusts, versus more immediate lifetime gifts, and pointing to the Commentary to Uniform Trust Code Section 601 that observes that "Given [the] primary use of the revocable trust as a device for disposing of property at death, the capacity standard for will rather than that for lifetime gifts should apply."
  • Legal Standards regarding Undue Influence: noting that "will and trust contests rarely rely on either a lack of capacity or undue influence claim alone. Usually, these claims are filed together, on the theory that even if the testator had the minimum level of capacity necessary to execute a valid will, her capacity was so diminished that she was more susceptible to the undue influence alleged. And California cases for decades have shown the tough burden a contestant has in contests on grounds of lack of capacity and undue influence."
  • Pre-Death Contests:  discussing standards used for decision-making by appointed guardians or conservators, including "substituted judgment," as well as states that have adopted statutory procedures that "expressly allow for pre-death determination of the validity of a will or trust," including Arkansas, Alaska, North Dakota and Ohio.  See e.g., Ohio Rev. Code Ann. Section 2107.081 to 085.
  • Intentional Interference with Expected Inheritance: summarizing the influential 2012 case of Beckwith v. Dahl, recognizing the tort of IIEI in California.    

In the outline linked above, the authors also addressed practical estate planning topics, such as the importance of asking "why" when crafting dispositive provisions in estate documents,  whether to videotape execution of testamentary documents, and whether to use "no contest" clauses.

December 10, 2015 in Cognitive Impairment, Consumer Information, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Estates and Trusts, Ethical Issues, Legal Practice/Practice Management, Property Management, State Cases, State Statutes/Regulations | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, November 5, 2015

Are There Limitations on Estate "Re-Planning" Following Adult Adoptions, Especially for Same-Sex Couples?

In my course on Wills, Trusts and Estates, students always seem to be intrigued by "adult adoptions." There can be a variety of reasons for an adult adoption, often tied to estate planning goals, including attempts to create statutory heirs that can nullify challenges by other family members to bequests in traditional estate documents, such as wills or trusts on the grounds of "undue influence."  Sometimes the cases are connected to sad facts, such as the troubled life of tobacco heiress Doris Duke, who at age of 75 adopted a much younger woman, but came to regret that fact, leading to a mostly unsuccessful attempt at disinheritance. Robert Sitkoff's casebook on Wills Trusts & Estates has a fascinating profile of the Duke case, even though the original reasons for the adoption were not entirely clear. 

In the news this week is a less unhappy, but still complicated case -- and I imagine there could be similar cases around the country -- where in 2012,  after forty years as a same-sex couple, a retired teacher adopted his partner, a retired writer: 

Now, they're trying to undo the adoption to get married and a state trial court judge has rejected their request, saying his ability to annul adoptions is generally limited to instances of fraud.

 

"We never thought we'd see the day" that same-sex marriage would be legal in Pennsylvania, Esposito, 78, told CNN in a telephone interview. The adoption "gave us the most legitimate thing available to us" at the time, said Bosee, 68.

 For more on the facts, see "Couple Seeks Right to Marry.  The Hitch? They're Legally Father and Son," by CNN writers Evan Perez and Ariane de Vogue.  
 
And a hat tip to Dickinson Law student Kadeem Morris, who spotted this interesting piece. 

November 5, 2015 in Current Affairs, Estates and Trusts, Ethical Issues, Legal Practice/Practice Management, Property Management, State Cases, State Statutes/Regulations | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, October 22, 2015

NYT: Dying Alone Is Not -- in the Long Run -- a Solo Activity

In one of those feature articles that The New York Times does so well, N.R. Kleinfeld reports The Lonely Death of George Bell.  It is a sad story, as Mr. Bell died in his apartment at the age of 72 and no one "missed him," so his body was not discovered for days.  You may have stopped reading precisely because it is such a sad story.  But, at the same time, George's story is a surprising tale of the potential consequences of dying alone.  The article lays out the layers of necessary decision-making, from the simplest of questions -- where will George be buried -- to the complex, where public authorities must hunt for an executor and for beneficiaries named in George's 30-year old will.  Then, in turn they must hunt for their heirs, when it turns out that this modest man's death left behind almost a half million dollar estate and few living connections.

My thanks to Penn State law student Kevin Horne who shared with me the link to this interesting story.  As he points out, this story gives another side to our course on Wills Trusts & Estates.     

October 22, 2015 in Current Affairs, Estates and Trusts, Legal Practice/Practice Management, Property Management, State Cases, State Statutes/Regulations | Permalink | Comments (2)

Wednesday, October 21, 2015

The Importance of Understanding Trusts in Family Law, Especially If Divorce Looms

The ABA Section on Family Law has devoted the entire Fall 2015 issue of its Family Advocate magazine to "Crossing Paths with a Trust."   The paper copy of the issue just appeared on my desk. The opening editorial advises family law attorneys advising clients considering divorce not to fear trusts:

Lawyers who simply take a deep breath and read the trust will often be surprised to learn that they have in their hands a road map for how assets will be managed, who gets what, when they get it, and under what terms. 

The articles in the issue include a "plain English guide to trusts as a means of orchestrating assets in divorce cases," how trusts can interact with disclosure requirements for premarital agreements, how to address equitable division of interests assigned to trusts, the use of child support or alimony trusts, and the unique potential advantages for using trusts for "special needs" planning for disabled children.  The issue ends with a bonus -- a primer on "will basics."

The articles underscore what I sometimes find myself saying to law students, that courses on "wills, trusts and estates" are about advanced family law issues, and that if families fail to address disputes among family members while they are still living, the issues may not be any less complicated when the asset-holding family member passes away. 

The entire issue seems like a good resource for a wide audience, including law students.  Unfortunately, the on-line version of Family Advocate issues is restricted to ABA Family Law Section members, at least during the first few weeks of  publication.  Apparently you can purchase paper copies (see for example the rates for the previous issue, for  Summer 2015) , including bulk orders, although I find there is often a lag time for specific issues to become available to purchase.  I guess you have to keep checking!    

October 21, 2015 in Estates and Trusts, Ethical Issues, Health Care/Long Term Care, Housing, Legal Practice/Practice Management, Property Management, Retirement, State Cases, State Statutes/Regulations | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, October 12, 2015

Mental Health Awareness - What They Don't Teach You in Law School (...Really??)

Last week was "Mental Illness Awareness Week," and in recognition of that fact, Maryland  Attorney Michael E. McCabe, Jr. posted an important Blog item on representing clients with diminished capacity.  I'm impressed that discussion of the need for lawyers to appreciate the potential for mental health to impact any aspect of the lawyer-client relationship is written for the IPethics & INsights blog, his law firm's " resource for intellectual property rights attorneys." 

In other words, the topics of mental health and legal capacity are not exclusively the province of estate planners, elder law attorneys, disability law practitioners or poverty law experts.

He notes at the outset:

According to the leading mental health organization in the country, 1 in 5 adults in the United States suffers from some form of mental health condition or disorder. Thus, it is likely that at some point in your legal career, you will be representing an individual client or a representative of a corporate client, who suffers from some degree of mental illness.

Attorney McCabe points to ABA Model Rule of Professional Conduct 1.14 as guidance, while also suggesting:

A two-prong test may be useful when determining the existence and degree of a client's mental illness:

 

(1) "take reasonable steps to optimize capacity," and

 

(2) "perform a preliminary assessment of capacity."

Attorney McCabe also links (although not directly attributing his recommendation) to Charlie Sabatino's important 2000 article, "Representing a Client with Diminished Capacity:  How Do You Know It And What Do You Do About It?"

I suppose I do have a small quarrel with the author, however.  The title of his post is "What They Didn't Teach You in Law School: Representing  Client with Diminished Capacity."  Mr. McCabe graduated law school in 1992, and perhaps diminished capacity was not well addressed by law schools at that time.  Although it could be my bias as an academic interested in aging policy, I believe law schools have changed with the times.  Certainly I find myself teaching the importance of "capacity" issues and the attorney-client relationship, and I start this in my 1L course on Contracts, while digging deeper into the field of mental health impacts in Wills/Trusts/Estates and, of course, Elder Law.  Other faculty members address mental health in a variety of other contexts, including courses on education law.

If Mr. McCabe is right that law schools are not currently addressing the complex concerns attached to mental health, then certainly the moral from his column is "we need to do better." 

My thanks to Attorney McCabe, and to Dickinson Law Professor Laurel Terry for sharing his article. 

October 12, 2015 in Cognitive Impairment, Current Affairs, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Ethical Issues, Health Care/Long Term Care, Legal Practice/Practice Management, Property Management | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, September 29, 2015

Does LegalZoom Compete with Law Firms? Co-Founder Brian Liu Says "No"

Over the weekend I caught an interview with Brian Liu, co-founder of LegalZoom, broadcast on From Scratch, a radio show about "entrepreneurial life."  The host, Jessica Harris, who has an interesting business background of her own, is a very good interviewer, encouraging guests to explore strengths and weaknesses of their ideas, moving from first inspiration to current goals.  She also asks "work/life balance" questions, often getting candid admissions of the private struggles some have to achieve balance.

I was intrigued with Liu's central premise, that his company does not compete, at least not directly, with law firms for business.  Rather, he believes that the vast majority of clients are drawn to his company precisely because they would never go to a lawyer, whether because of cost, unease about attorneys, or perceptions about value. 

It was also interesting to hear that Legal Zoom's first ten clients, accessing the company's on-line document portal on a Friday night, were seeking "living wills."  That fact tells us a lot about underserved legal and health care needs, doesn't it.  

September 29, 2015 in Advance Directives/End-of-Life, Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Estates and Trusts, Ethical Issues, Health Care/Long Term Care, Legal Practice/Practice Management, Web/Tech | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, September 10, 2015

New York Ethics Opinion Addresses Potential Conflicts in Elder Law Practice

A New York ethics opinion issued July 27, 2015 is a useful reminder of the possibility -- indeed probability -- that law firms well known for specializing in elder law or estate planning may be approached by successive generations of family members, thus creating potential issues of confidentiality (and more). 

In the matter under consideration, involving a small law firm that practiced "primarily in the fields of estate planning and administration, trusts  and elder law," two of the lawyers had a long relationship with a "father," including representation of the father in a contested adult guardianship case. 

Later, a different lawyer in the firm met with a "son" of the father to discuss personal estate planning following a "public seminar" hosted by the firm.  That lawyer did not conduct a "conflict check" before a first meeting, one on-one, with the son.  (One can see how a law firm might be tempted to skip or delay a step in conflict-checking when organizing these kinds of business-generating efforts, a potential not directly addressed in the New York opinion. Would disclaimers or warnings about "client relationships" not forming immediately remedy potential problems -- or perhaps make them even more complicated?)

The law firm, upon discovering the potential for concerns, made the decision not to go forward with representation of the son, and then asked the New York State Bar Association's Committee on Professional Ethics for guidance on whether rules either "required" or "permitted" the law firm to disclose to the father the son's request for representation, or whether the firm was prohibited from further representation of the father.

For the New York ethics committee's interesting analysis,  see New York Ethics Opinion 1067.  For a contrasting "multi-generational" representation problem involving a husband's undisclosed "heir," see A. v. B., decided by the New Jersey Supreme Court in 1999, a case that is a good springboard for discussion of professional responsibilities for attorneys in the course on Wills, Trust & Estates (as I discovered in the Dukeminer/Sitkoff textbook). 

September 10, 2015 in Books, Estates and Trusts, Ethical Issues, Legal Practice/Practice Management, State Cases, State Statutes/Regulations | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, August 26, 2015

LegalZoom Touts "Legal Advice"

Traditional estate practice attorneys are facing ever-increasing competition from commercial sites offering document preparation for set fees, usually through use of on-line templates for wills and similar estate planning documents.  LegalZoom, Inc., the brainchild of attorneys, including Brian Lee and Robert Shapiro (of O.J. Simpson trial fame) and begun in 2001, is one of the biggest commercial document companies. 

Traditional lawyers point out that they provide not just "documents" but core counseling and advice about the larger issues that may be involved in proper estate planning.  Recently, however, I've noticed LegalZoom is also touting availability of "legal help" through its television commercials, with the tagline "Real Attorneys. Real Advice."  Here's a link to one recent example.   

The small print at the bottom of the page at the end includes full names and locations of the several attorneys who say "hi" during the television commercial, plus the following: 

"This is an advertisement of a prepaid legal services plan, not for an individual attorney. This is not an attorney recommendation or legal advice. No comparative qualitative statements intended.... For the attorneys' full addresses, a list of non-appearing attorneys and more information, please visit legalzoom.com." 

Earlier this year, LegalZoom filed an antitrust lawsuit against the North Carolina Bar, asserting that the organization was "unreasonable barring" the company from offering a prepaid legal services plan in its state.  The suit cites the February 2015 decision by the U.S. Supreme Court in North Carolina State Board of Dental Examiners v. Federal Trade CommissionLegalZoom filed an amicus brief in that case outlining its theory that misuse of state bar regulatory authority to restrict access to legal advice harms consumers. 

August 26, 2015 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Estates and Trusts, Ethical Issues, Federal Cases, Legal Practice/Practice Management, Property Management, State Statutes/Regulations | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, August 14, 2015

Should "Springing" Powers of Attorney (Once Again) Be the Norm?

In a recent article for the University of Baltimore Law Review, John C. Craft, a clinical professor at Faulkner University Law, draws upon the history of legislation governing powers of attorney to advocate a return to effectiveness of the POA being conditioned by an event, such as proof of incapacity. Professor Craft, who is the director of his law school's Elder Law Clinic, writes:

Section 109 in the Uniform Power of Attorney Act should be revised making springing effectiveness of an agent's powers the default rule. Springing powers of attorney provide a type of protection that may actually prevent power of attorney abuse. The current protective provisions in the UPOAA focus in large part on the types of abuse that occur after an agent has begun acting for the principal. As opposed to arguably ineffective “harm rules” intended to punish an unscrupulous agent, springing powers of attorney are a type of “power rule” intended to limit an agent's “ability to accumulate power . . . in the first place.” The event triggering an agent's accumulation of power -- the principal's incapacity -- may never occur. A financial institution may prevent an unscrupulous agent from activating his or her power and conducting an abusive transaction simply by asking for proof that the principal is incapacitated. In addition, making springing effectiveness the standard serves the goal of enhancing a principal's autonomy.

For his complete analysis, read Preventing Exploitation and Preserving Autonomy: Making Springing Powers of Attorney the Standard.

August 14, 2015 in Advance Directives/End-of-Life, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Estates and Trusts, Ethical Issues, Legal Practice/Practice Management, Property Management, State Cases, State Statutes/Regulations | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, August 12, 2015

Borchard Center Announces 2015-16 "Law and Aging Fellows"

Mary Jane Ciccarello, co-director of the Borchard  Center on Law and Aging, recently sent us the latest news on the fellowships announced for the 2015-16 grant year.  There is strong competition for these key sources of funding for recent law school graduates to engage in new or expanded initiatives in law and aging.  The new fellows include: 

  • Krista Granen, a 2015 University of California-Hastings graduate, who will partner with Bay Area Legal Aid in San Francisco to implement a multi-faceted project to provide direct services, establish a mobile “pop-up” clinic to accommodate seniors’ physical and capacity based impairments, and promulgate resource materials in the intersectional areas of consumer protection and Social Security. Her project will promote economic security for low-income seniors residing in Santa Clara County, a county that simultaneously experiences extreme class stratification and a dearth of necessary legal services. 
 
  • Jennifer Kye, a 2014 UVA graduate, at Community Legal Services of Philadelphia, who will implement a three-part project focused on increasing vulnerable seniors’ access to Medicaid home and community-based services. Her project will include: (1) systemic advocacy at the state level to expand the availability and improve the delivery of these critically needed home-based services; (2) development of a self-help manual that will allow seniors to advocate for themselves in accessing services in their own homes; and (3) direct representation of low-income older adults in obtaining and keeping home-based services and supports.

 

  • Stephanie Ridella Vittandsm, a 2014 Chicago-Kent graduate, who will continue her work at the Chicago Center for Disability and Elder Law, advocating for low-income seniors in housing matters, including eviction defense, public housing voucher termination defense, and representing seniors evicting tenants or family members from their homes. By prioritizing time-sensitive housing cases and conducting expedited intake interviews, she can continue to intervene in emergency housing cases.  She will continue to administer the Pro Se Guardianship Help Desk, which provides assistance to petitioners seeking guardianship over family members.   

 

  • Shana Wynn, a 22015 graduate of North Carolina Central Law School, who joins Justice in Aging (formerly the National Senior Citizens Law Center) and the Neighborhood Legal Services Program (NLSP) in Washington, DC.  Ms. Wynn will work closely with Justice in Aging attorneys to formulate policy recommendations to improve the Social Security Administration’s (SSA) representative payee program for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) recipients and Social Security beneficiaries. Ms. Wynn will partner with NLSP to provide pro bono services to low-income seniors and secure access to healthcare and public benefits such as SSI. The primary goal of the project is to identify and address problems relating to SSA’s representative payee program as a means to better protect our most vulnerable seniors from misuse of their modest incomes.
Congratulations to these hard working Fellows.  For law students or recent graduates thinking about applying for a future Borchard Law and Aging Fellowship grant, a reminder that the annual deadline is in mid-April.  Start your planning now!

August 12, 2015 in Discrimination, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Estates and Trusts, Ethical Issues, Grant Deadlines/Awards, Health Care/Long Term Care, Housing, Legal Practice/Practice Management | Permalink | Comments (1)

Wednesday, July 22, 2015

Comparative Law: Practice Guide for Representing Vulnerable Clients in England & Wales

Law Society England Wales

The Law Society of England and Wales recently issued a "Practice Note" for lawyers (or rather, "solicitors") on representing vulnerable clients, including but not limited to clients with dementia.  The guideline reflects research that demonstrated "solicitors need to adapt their practices to identify and meet the needs of vulnerable clients." The guide recognizes that "vulnerable" clients may include a range of persons, and may involve physical or mental capacity issues of varying degrees.

The guide warns that failure to "meet the needs of a vulnerable client" may trigger:

  • A discrimination claim or a claim for a failure to make reasonable adjustments under the Equality Act 2010, which could result in sanctions including damages.
  • A claim for damages or compensation against you or your firm if you act on the instructions of a client lacking capacity to make relevant decisions, having failed to satisfy yourself as to the client's capacity to instruct you or failing to document your assessment of the client's capacity, leaving the validity of the transaction open to challenge.
  • A complaint against you to the Legal Ombudsman, which could result in your name being published and/or you having to pay financial compensation. The ombudsman will refer complaints about discrimination to the SRA.
  • Reputational risk - your practice's reputation is inextricably linked to the way in which you treat your clients. Conversely, a practice with an inclusive ethos will not only attract a wider group of clients but also a more diverse workforce bringing benefits to the business.

The guide has a detailed discussion of mental capacity issues, including the attorney's need to consider the following four factors:

Continue reading

July 22, 2015 in Cognitive Impairment, Discrimination, Ethical Issues, International, Legal Practice/Practice Management | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, July 17, 2015

Friday Fun: Therapy Pets Make a Difference in LTC Settings

Miss Thelma LouElderLawGuy Jeff Marshall Esq. has a staffer who works with therapy dogs in nursing homes and Jeff posted Josephine Reviello's interesting essay on her experiences. She begins with a surprising history of the "case law" behind the nickname for dogs as "Man's Best Friend:"

The popularization of the phrase is actually said to have come from an attorney, George Graham Vest. In 1870, Vest was in the courtroom representing a farmer who was suing for damages after his dog “Old Drum” was shot by a neighbor. Toward the closing of the trial, Mr. Vest said, “A man’s dog stands by him in prosperity and in poverty, in health and in sickness. He will sleep on the cold ground, where the wintry winds blow and the snow drives fiercely, if only he may be near his master’s side. He will kiss the hand that has no food to offer, he will lick the wounds and sores that come in encounters with the roughness of the world. He guards the sleep of his pauper master as if he were a prince. When all other friends desert, he remains. When riches take wings and reputation falls to pieces, he is as constant in his love as the sun in its journey through the heavens.” 

 

And later, the phrase shortened to “man’s best friend”.  Vest won the case and also won its appeal to the Missouri Supreme Court. A statue of the dog stands in front of the Warrensburg, Missouri courthouse.

The author's dog is an Old English Sheepdog, Hannah Bear.  I can just imagine how popular she would be! 

Here at Dickinson Law, my colleague Pam Knowlton has three experienced therapy dogs.  Pam commented how the experience of working with her dogs in the nursing home also helps her: Thelma Lou at the Beach

"Nothing makes me feel better inside than spending a couple of hours at a nursing home where people who want to pet our dogs. It totally lightens up the entire atmosphere -- for everyone."

Of course, occasionally Pam's critters have been known to go on vacation, especially at this time of the year when they sneak off to the beach for a little R & R.  Be careful, Thelma Lou; too much time in the sun can cause wrinkles!

July 17, 2015 in Consumer Information, Health Care/Long Term Care, Legal Practice/Practice Management | Permalink | Comments (1)

Thursday, July 16, 2015

Highlights from Upcoming Pennsylvania Elder Law Institute on July 23 & 24

Probably the best bang for your CLE buck in Pennsylvania comes from the two-day Elder Law Institute hosted each summer by the Pennsylvania Bar Institute. This year the 18th annual event is on July 23 & 24 in Harrisburg. 

Highlights include:

  • "The Year in Review" with attorneys Marielle Hazen and Robert Clofine sharing duties to report on key legislative, regulatory and judicial developments from the last 12 months;
  • How to "maximize" eligibility for home and community based services (Steve Feldman and Pam Walz);
  • Cross disciplinary discussions of end-of-life care with medical professionals and hospice providers;
  • LTC "provider" perspectives (Kimber Latsha and Jacqueline Shafer);
  • Latest on proposals to change Veterans' Pension Benefits (Dennis Pappas);
  • Implementation of the Pa Supreme Court's Elder Law Task Force Recommendations (Judges Lois Murphy, Paula Ott, Sheila Woods-Skipper & Christin Hamel);
  • A closing session opportunity, "Let's Ask the Department of Human Services Counsel" (with Addie Abelson, Mike Newell & Lesley Oakes)

There is still time to registration (you can attend one or both days; lunches are included and there is a reception the first evening).  

I think this is the first year I have missed this key opportunity for networking and updates; but I'm sending my research assistant!    

July 16, 2015 in Advance Directives/End-of-Life, Cognitive Impairment, Current Affairs, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Estates and Trusts, Ethical Issues, Federal Cases, Health Care/Long Term Care, Legal Practice/Practice Management, Medicaid, Medicare, Programs/CLEs, Property Management, Social Security, State Cases, State Statutes/Regulations, Veterans | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, July 12, 2015

NYT: Specialists with Team Skills May Help with Planning

From the New York Times, Making Decisions about Elder Housing May Take a Team Effort, by John Wasik:

But for elderly people like Ms. Renninger, now 83, deciding what to do next can be an almost overwhelming task. Is it time to move to a nursing home or some other type of assisted living? Or will home care with a variety of support services work?

 

It is an issue millions of people — especially baby boomers and their parents — are grappling with now. The choices are so complex that more and more people are finding they cannot make the decisions alone. As a result, with the number of Americans age 85 and older growing faster than any other age group, as the Congressional Budget Office reports, so is the demand for elder care specialists.

Detailing what many Elder Law Attorneys also provide, the article gives several examples of professionals with multi-disciplinary skills, such as a geriatric care manager, or a doctor who is also a certified financial planner.  Thanks to Professor Laurel Terry for sending this timely link.

July 12, 2015 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Health Care/Long Term Care, Housing, Legal Practice/Practice Management, Property Management | Permalink | Comments (0)