Friday, May 22, 2015

Is There A Role for Mediation in Prevention of Financial Abuse of Older People?

In the May 2015 issue of Conflict Resolution Quarterly, four authors use quantitative and qualitative data collected in Australia to identify risk factors for the financial abuse of older people by a family member, analyze the potential usefulness of mediation as a strategy to prevent this form of elder abuse, and to identify knowledge and skills important to mediators facing potential financial abuse.

The authors note that mediation is in the early stages of consideration as a strategic tool for combating financial elder abuse, and thus much of their report focuses on "potential" risks or benefits of mediation, rather than instances of its use.  Nonetheless their study leads to interesting conclusions, including:

Potential advantages:

(1) enhancing the rights and wishes of older people,

(2) opening and facilitating communication between family members and older persons,

(3) enhancing accountability and responsibility of family members, and

(4) reducing family conflict.

The authors also identify potential concerns, including:

Continue reading

May 22, 2015 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Ethical Issues, International | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, May 14, 2015

During Month of May on PBS: "Caring for Mom & Dad"

Caring for Mom & DadPBS is premiering a powerful documentary special, Caring for Mom & Dad, during the month of May, with Meryl Streep as the narrator.  A sample? Many of us might find resonance with one adult's "bad daughter" (or "bad son") feelings of guilt, candidly admitted here. 

Even more important than the video itself will be the conversations that follow viewing. Check your local public t.v. schedule to see when the program will air in your area.  (You can check here, to see if the documentary is scheduled yet in your viewing area -- go to the drop down menu for "Schedule.") Plus, in some markets, the documentary will be combined with a live call-in opportunity for individuals and families to explore health care, social care, financial topics and legal issues with a panel of experts.

My own university, Penn State, is hosting the special on Thursday, May 28, 2015  at 8:00 p.m. (Eastern time), followed by Conversations Live at 9:00 p.m. That is two weeks from today on WPSU-TV, a station that reaches a viewing area of 29 counties in central Pennsylvania. In addition, the Conversations Live program will be broadcast on WPSU-FM radio and can be viewed "on-line" at WPSU.org

As a result of an invitation to be part of the WPSU studio panel, I've had the opportunity to watch the documentary -- several times (it's that interesting!) -- in preparation to help in responding to audience comments, emails and call-in questions.  Additional Conversations Live guests include:

    Ai-jen Poo, co-director of Caring Across Generations and director of National Domestic Workers Alliance, will be joining via satellite from D.C.  Ai-jen Poo is featured in the documentary, and she also has a particular interest in enactment of a Domestic Workers' Bill of Rights, to deal realistically and fairly with the work force that will be necessary to meet the boomer generation's care needs.

    Dr. Gwen McGhan, Hartford Center for Geriatric Nursing Excellence at Penn State, with a research background on informal family caregiving.

    Jane McDowell, Hartford Center for Geriatric Nursing Excellence at Penn State, and a geriatric nurse practitioner.

The documentary was produced by WGBH-Boston, with funding assistance from AARP and Pfizer.

Please join us and share your stories and observations. The documentary starts with personal stories, but the public policy messages that emerge are ones that need to be heard at state and federal levels -- and heard clearly -- for there to be hope for realistic, necessary and timely solutions.

May 14, 2015 in Cognitive Impairment, Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Ethical Issues, Federal Statutes/Regulations, Film, Health Care/Long Term Care, Medicaid, Medicare, Social Security, State Statutes/Regulations | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, May 11, 2015

A Juror's Perspective from the Iowa Sexual Assault-Dementia Trial

I'm catching up on news items after being away for a few days.  There are additional insights about the sad trial of Henry Rayhons in Iowa, that ultimately resulted in his acquittal, from one of the jurors, who also happened to be a reporter.  Too often it is easy to focus about what is wrong with the court system, but here is a reminder of just how seriously most jurors take their duties. 

Read, "The Rayhons Trial: A Juror's Perspective," by Angela Nelson.  And my thanks to Bryan Gruley who made sure we did not miss this powerful coda to the trial. 

May 11, 2015 in Cognitive Impairment, Crimes, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Ethical Issues, Health Care/Long Term Care, State Cases, State Statutes/Regulations | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, May 1, 2015

Criminal Record? Is Life-Time Ban from Care Industry Employment Necessary to Protect Older, Vulnerable Persons?

In 2003, in Nixon v. Commonwealth, Pennsylvania's Supreme Court struck down a provision of the state's Older Adult Protective Services Act that imposed an absolute bar on designated care "facilities," including nursing homes, personal care homes, and home health agencies, prohibiting them from hiring  "new" employees who had been convicted of certain crimes. The Court concluded that the prohibition, which affected only "new" employees, or those working at a covered facility for less than one year, did not bear a real and substantial relationship to the Commonwealth's interest in protecting the elderly, disabled, and infirm from victimization, and therefore unconstitutionally infringe[d] on the Employees' right to pursue an occupation." 

Twelve years later, the Pennsylvania legislature, despite consideration of many proposals to "fix" the "Nixon case problem," still had not amended the statute. (This is the second time in a week that Pennsylvania's speed -- or lack thereof -- in enacting important reforms has attracted media attention.) As explained by NPR in a feature story by Carrie Johnson, a new lawsuit again challenges Pennsylvania's employment ban:

In 1981, when he was just 18, [Tyrone] Peake was arrested with a friend for trying to steal a car to take a girl home after a long weekend. "No, we never got the car," Peake said. "We broke the ignition column and then the cops came."

 

Peake couldn't even drive back then. He says he was just along for the ride. He never went to prison. Instead, he got probation. But that single charge years ago still haunts him, sometimes even after he's gotten work....

 

"I've been fired from three jobs," Peake said, "because [of] having a criminal record. And my record is like 32 years old, and I haven't been in trouble since then." A lot's happened since the 1980s for Peake. He went back to school, and he's been working part time as a counselor for men addicted to drugs and alcohol. But the law prevents him from being hired full time to work in a nursing home or long-term-care facility because of that single criminal conviction.

Peake's history of attempting to get on the right side of the law presents a dramatic contrast between the law's laudable purpose of protection of vulnerable adults and its sometimes harsh effect.  For more, see NPR's Can't Get A Job Because Of A Criminal Record? A Lawsuit Is Trying To Change That. 

May 1, 2015 in Crimes, Discrimination, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Ethical Issues, Health Care/Long Term Care, State Cases, State Statutes/Regulations | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, April 30, 2015

Thinking About Fiduciary Duty As A Core Concept for "Elder Law"

I tend to think of "Elder Law" as a subset of "Laws and Policies of Aging."  Given what appears to me to be a steady increase in public concern about ways in which some older persons are exploited financially, it occurs to me that we may be at a point where "fiduciary duty" is becoming a central -- perhaps even the central -- concept for the future practice of Elder Law, overtaking even Medicaid planning and end-of-life health care planning. Seasoned practitioners already know that the "million dollar question" in Elder Law is "who is my client?" -- a question intimately tied to carrying out fiduciary duties as an attorney.

Along that line, I've been digging into my stack of "must read" books, a stack that is always a threat to my safety as it gets taller and taller no matter how fast and furiously I read. I'm very much enjoying a book by Boston University Law Professor Tamar Frankel titled, simply enough, Fiduciary Law (Oxford University Press, 2011). 

Early in the book, the author, whose teaching and research interests include corporation governance and regulation of financial systems, proposes a definition of "fiduciary relationships," which I find both intriguing and conducive to discussion.  I don't think it is taking too much away from her full book, to repeat the four features Professor Frankel proposes as triggering fiduciary duties.  She writes:

Continue reading

April 30, 2015 in Books, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Estates and Trusts, Ethical Issues, Health Care/Long Term Care, Legal Practice/Practice Management, Retirement | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, April 29, 2015

Systemic Concerns about Adult (Including Older Adult) Guardinships in Nevada

After my blog piece earlier this week about "elder guardianship" concerns in Florida, I've received communications about similar concerns in other states, including Nevada.

According to a report by Contact 13 (ABC affiliate), on April 21 Commissioners in Clark County (Las Vegas area) conducted a "first-of-its-kind" hearing on alleged guardianship abuses that were described by some as "appalling, frightening and plagued by problems." At the heart of the complaints by individuals and family members was frequent court appointment of "private guardians" rather than family members, and an alleged absence of notice to family members about court hearings. A "blue ribbon" panel or expert may be appointed to audit Clark County's court-supervised guardianships.  A recent statement by the Chief Judge for the district court, set forth in full on the Contact 13 website, pledges the court's commitment to "ensuring clarity and instilling public trust in the process of handling guardianship cases.

According to the Las Vegas Review-Journal, the Chief Judge's response follows a series of stories by the Review-Journal about "thousands of elderly and mentally ill in Clark County open to exploitation."

As reported by the Las Vegas media, the problems reported in Nevada are not unique to one county or even to one state, as demonstrated by an Associated Press series of articles in 1987 titled "Guardianships of the Elderly: An Ailing System."   See also the national Center for Elders and the Courts for more information on guardianship reforms in state courts.

April 29, 2015 in Cognitive Impairment, Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Estates and Trusts, Ethical Issues, Health Care/Long Term Care, Legal Practice/Practice Management, State Cases, State Statutes/Regulations, Statistics | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, April 28, 2015

Upcoming Webinar: U.S. Department of Justice and Fraud Schemes Targeting Older Americans

U.S. Department of Justice and Fraud Schemes Targeting Older Americans

  1. Wed, May 27, 2015 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM CDT

U.S. Department of Justice and  Fraud Schemes Targeting Older Americans Attorneys from the Department of Justice’s Consumer Protection Branch will describe fraud schemes targeting older Americans, including Jamaican lottery scams and large-scale psychic schemes. The crimes, perpetrated through mass mailings and telemarketing, affect hundreds of thousands of U.S. consumers. Presenters will describe how the scams contact victims, the manner in which they operate and the Consumer Protection Branch’s interception and prosecution efforts. The webinar will also address tips on how to avoid the scams and improve prevention efforts.

Presenters:
Rich Goldberg (Assistant Director, U.S. Department of Justice, Consumer Protection Branch); Kate Drenning (Trial Attorney, U.S. Department of Justice, Consumer Protection Branch); Ann Entwistle (Trial Attorney, U.S. Department of Justice, Consumer Protection Branch)

Additional sponsorship for this Webinar is provided by a grant from the Administration on Aging/Administration for Community Living. This webinar is part of a series of National Elder Rights Training Project webinars for the National Legal Resource Center.

There is no charge for this webinar.
All time listings are in Eastern Time.
If you have any questions email trainings@nclc.org

April 28, 2015 in Crimes, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Webinars | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Monday, April 27, 2015

News Reports Spotlight Guardianship Issues in the Sunshine State

Recent news reports in the Sarasota Herald-Tribune have focused on "elder guardianships" in Florida.  The articles include:

  • The Kindness of Strangers: Inside Elder Guardianship in Florida, a three part "special project."
  • A Civil Dispute Over Guardianship, detailing a conflict between co-trustees for a man in his 90s over costs of care.  One trustee was concerned about what appear to be charities named as remainder beneficiaries and was described as making "imaginative" use of a guardianship to challenge the wife's role as the other named trustee.  A sidebar in this article describes bills pending in the Florida legislature seeking to clarify the legal effect of a "power of attorney" when a guardianship petition is filed. 
  • Film to Detail Horror Stories from Florida Guardianship, describing a video project to share "stories about Florida's adult guardianship system," supported by a local "nonprofit organization called Americans Against Abusive Probate Guardianship."

April 27, 2015 in Current Affairs, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Estates and Trusts, Ethical Issues, Health Care/Long Term Care, Property Management, State Cases, State Statutes/Regulations | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Iowa's New Law Recognizes Rights of Communication and Visitation in Guardianships

On April 24, 2015, Iowa's Governor signed SF 306 into law, amending Iowa's Guardianship Law to recognize an express right of adult wards to "communication, visitation, or interaction with other persons." The law's effective date is July 1, 2015.

The law further provides that a court shall deny such rights "only upon a showing of good cause by the guardian."  In the absence of an ability to give "express consent to such communication, visitation or interaction with a person due to a physical or mental condition, consent of an adult ward may be presumed by a guardian or a court based on an adult ward's prior relationship with such person."

This is an interesting law, especially coming on the heels of the Henry Rayhons trial in Iowa, even though there appears to be no direct correlation. The new provision does not, for example, define "interaction."

According to news reports, Kerri Kasem, the daughter of radio D.J. Casey Kasem, was present at the ceremony and lobbied for the bill after her late father was moved from his nursing home in California, first to Nevada and then to Washington without his children's knowledge or consent:

 “This is a silent epidemic,” she said. “There are so many abuses of guardianships and so many abuses of caretakers.”

April 27, 2015 in Advance Directives/End-of-Life, Cognitive Impairment, Current Affairs, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Estates and Trusts, Ethical Issues, Health Care/Long Term Care, State Cases, State Statutes/Regulations | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Sunday, April 26, 2015

NYT: Financial Skills May Be "First to Go"

Sunday's New York Times has a feature article on aging and financial skills, and the message is not "just" for individuals with dementia:

"Studies show that the ability to perform simple math problems, as well as handling financial matters, are typically one of the first set of skills to decline in diseases of the mind, like Alzheimer’s, and Ms. Clark’s father-in-law, who suffered from mild dementia, was no exception. Research has also shown that even cognitively normal people may reach a point where financial decision-making becomes more challenging."

The article gives several example of individuals who were vulnerable to exploitation, because of their reduced interest in or understanding of financial decisions. David Laibson, an economics professor at Harvard, one of the researchers cited in the article said "he believed that crystallized intelligence tended to plateau when people reached their 70s." Further, "he wishes all 65-year-olds would start by simplifying their financial lives, reducing the money clutter to just a few mutual funds at a reputable institution."

The article, As Cognition Slips, Financial Skills Are Often the First to Go, offers several links to recent reports and studies, as well as examples of "early signs."  

Hat tip to Penn State's Dickinson Law 1L student Spencer Flohr for sharing the link to this article -- and noting the probable relevance to law students' studies of trusts and estates law. Good catch!

April 26, 2015 in Cognitive Impairment, Consumer Information, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Estates and Trusts, Property Management | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, April 23, 2015

Nation's Capitol Ranks Fourth for Elders at Risk of Hunger

As summarized in a recent article in the Washington Post, a new study places Washington D.C. fourth in the nation for seniors at hunger risk:   

"The report says that more than 20 percent of the District’s elderly have concerns about eating enough food or the right kind of food, compared with more than 24 percent of seniors in Mississippi.

 

The estimates of senior hunger range from about 8 percent in Minnesota to more than 26 percent in Arkansas, which was ranked highest among states where seniors face the threat of hunger. Virginia and Maryland both had rates of about 14 percent.

 

The analysis – conducted by two university researchers on behalf of the nonprofit National Foundation to End Senior Hunger and the National Association of States United for Aging and Disabilities – says nearly 15.5 percent of elders, or 9.6 million people, in the United States face the threat of hunger...."

My thanks to George Washington Law Professor Naomi Cahn for sharing this article. We agree -- depressing news. 

April 23, 2015 in Current Affairs, Discrimination, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Ethical Issues, Food and Drink, Housing | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, April 22, 2015

Iowa Sexual Assault/Dementia Trial -- and the Jury Says....

On Wednesday, April 22, 2015, at approximately 2:30 p.m. central time, after almost two full days of deliberations on a single count of statutory sexual abuse of his wife, a nursing home resident with dementia, the jury found 79-year-old former Iowa legislator Henry Rayhons NOT GUILTY. 

As shown with pictures posted by KIMT.com Twitter, there are many tears in the courtroom.

Interestingly, as another indication of the State's aggressive prosecution of this case, the prosecutor filed a "Statement" with the court in Garner, Iowa yesterday, while the jury was still deliberating, asking that in the event of a conviction, Mr. Rayhons be taken immediately into custody. The explanation? The state contended that under Iowa law, sexual abuse in the third degree is covered by Iowa Code Section 709.4.(2)(a), and that any exception to "forcible felony" treatment for criminal sexual acts occurring between husband and wife does not apply, because they were not "cohabiting," at the time. 

Therefore, argued the state, if convicted Mr. Rayhons would have been barred from posting bail pending appeal.  Further, the prosecution argued the defendant would not have been eligible for a deferred or suspended sentence, and, once released, would be subject to restrictive, special parole terms for the rest of his life.  See Iowa Code Section 701.11(1) on "forcible felony."  See also Iowa Code Section 811.1.  See also Iowa Code Section 907.3.

Fortunately for this defendant, the incarceration arguments are now moot. 

This case has demonstrated, all too clearly, that we need better understanding of the relationship between dementia and legal capacity. The Rayhons case challenges us to consider carefully the appropriate balance between protection of individuals with Alzheimer's and recognition of fundamental human rights.

As additional details emerge, we'll supplement this post. 

Here are two early stories on the aftermath of the jury's verdict:

From Bloomberg News' Bryan Gruley: Iowa Man Accused of Raping Wife with Alzheimer's is Acquitted, noting that this case "offered a rare look at a complex dilemma that will become more common as the 65-and-over population expands."

From The Des Moines Register (Tony Leys): Jury finds Henry Rayhons Not Guilty.

And from Iowa Public Radio and the local Globe Gazette, a brief video interview with a tearful Henry Rayhons. (Note the comments posted by viewers after the interview.)

April 22, 2015 in Cognitive Impairment, Crimes, Current Affairs, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Ethical Issues, Health Care/Long Term Care, State Cases, State Statutes/Regulations | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

New Report Spotlights Ineffectiveness of Enforcement of Nursing Home Care Standards

LTCCC press release says new study assesses nursing home citation rates nationwide, finds little or no punishment when nursing homes fail to provide care that meets the standards they are paid to achieve, even when such failures result in significant suffering.

Widespread and persistent nursing home problems, including serious deficiencies in care, result in unnecessary harm to thousands of vulnerable residents every day. Deficient and worthless services also cost taxpayers hundreds of millions of dollars a year. The nursing home industry frequently complains that it is one of the most highly regulated in the country. But what does that mean when so many nursing homes are consistently paid to provide care that fails to meet those standards?

LTCCC’s new report, , presents a comparative overview of every state’s (50 states + DC) performance on several key criteria. LTCCC assessed overall state citation rates, number and amounts of fines that each state has imposed in the last three years for violations of minimum standards and the rates at which the states identified resident harm when they found deficiencies. In addition to reviewing state citations as a whole, the study focused on three criteria important to quality care – pressure ulcers, staffing and antipsychotic drugging.

“While no data are perfect, we felt that assessing overall citation and penalty rates, as well as citations for three critical quality criteria, would together provide valuable insights into State Survey Agency performance and the extent to which important problems are being addressed in each state” said Richard Mollot, LTCCC’s Executive Director and author of the report.

Select findings:

1.     Resident Harm. States only find harm to residents 3.41% of the time that they cite a deficiency. California and Alabama tied for lowest in the country, finding harm only 1.14% of the time.

2.     Inappropriate Antipsychotic Drugging. The nationwide average antipsychotic drugging rate is 18.95% while the average citation rate for inappropriate drugging is 0.31%.  This indicates that there is a significant amount of inappropriate antipsychotic drugging that is not being cited by the states.

3.     Pressure Ulcers. Pressure ulcers (bed sores) are a problem for over 86,000 nursing home residents. Though they are largely preventable, states cite nursing homes the equivalent of less than 3% of the time that a resident has a pressure ulcer. When states do cite a facility for inadequate pressure ulcer care or prevention, they only identify this as harmful to residents about 25% of the time.     

4.     Sufficient Care Staff. Insufficient care staff is one of the biggest complaints made by nursing home residents and their families. Studies have repeatedly identified it as a serious problem in a majority of US nursing homes.  Nevertheless, insufficient staffing is rarely cited by the states. The annual rate of staffing deficiencies per resident is infinitesimal: 0.042%. Less than 5% of those deficiencies are identified as resulting in harm. Twenty one states never connect insufficient care staff to resident harm in their states.

The report is available on LTCCC’s dedicated nursing home website at http://www.nursinghome411.org/articles/?category=lawgovernment. The website includes interactive charts showing key rates for each state as well as national averages.  They include state rankings on criteria identified as important to nursing home resident care and the protection of taxpayer funds that pay for the majority of nursing home care. These charts can be used to gain insights into the strengths and weaknesses of quality oversight in any state. 

April 22, 2015 in Consumer Information, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Federal Statutes/Regulations, Health Care/Long Term Care, State Statutes/Regulations | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, April 21, 2015

Closing Arguments in the Iowa Sexual Assault/Dementia Trial (Updated)

Coverage of the closing arguments on Monday, from State of Iowa v. Henry Rahons, including video excerpts from each side's attorney, is provided here by the Des Moines Register.

According to KIMT.com's twitter feed, attorneys and Mr. Rayhons went into the judge's chambers at about 3:30 p.m. Central time on Tuesday, the second day of deliberations -- could a jury verdict be close?

UPDATE:  Apparently the conference in the judge's chambers was to address jury questions. At approximately 4:15 on Tuesday, April 21, the jury "left for the day," to return to deliberations on Wednesday.

April 21, 2015 in Cognitive Impairment, Crimes, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Ethical Issues, Health Care/Long Term Care, State Cases, State Statutes/Regulations | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Talking about Sexuality, Gender, Aging and Cognition


On April 20, while the jury was hearing oral arguments on the high profile case of State of Iowa v. Henry Rayhons, I joined an academic colleague, Dr. Claire Flaherty, a neuropsychologist from Penn State Hershey Medical Center, to discuss the implications of this criminal case, during a Smart Talk public radio program in central Pennsylvania.  Claire and I have been engaged in a cross-discipline dialogue for about two years about a host of legal questions that can arise with a diagnosis of any form of dementia, including FTD and Alzheimer's Disease.   This time we were talking about the challenges of finding the right balance between protection from harm and recognition of human rights when the issue is sexual intimacy. Dr. Flaherty's clinical background, including her experience counseling individuals and families who are coping with the realities of dementia, helped make this a very down-to-earth conversation on a sensitive subject for live radio.

Our half of the program, was preceded by Joanne Carroll, president of TransCentral PA, and therapist and social worker Alexis Lake, a therapist and social worker who counsels LGBT clients, who discussed challenges and rights for transgender, gay, lesbian, and bi-sexual people, and the progress that has been made in the last decade, even as more progress needs to be made.  I was struck by their frankness, both about their personal journeys, and the potential costs for anyone transitioning, including simple costs associated with new documents of identity, to bigger questions about how to pay for any surgeries, including whether Medicare will pay for the older person's surgery. 

To listen to the two half-hour segments, here's a link to the podcast of WITF'-FM's Smart Talk program for April 20, 2015.

UPDATE:  Here is an alternative link to the Smart Talk Program described above, on "SoundCloud," and available in three segments, each about 15 to 20 minutes in length.  Our discussion of dementia and consent to sexual relations starts at about the 9 minute mark of Segment B.

Download 150420 SHOW A

 Download 150420 SHOW B

Download 150420 SHOW C 

April 21, 2015 in Cognitive Impairment, Crimes, Current Affairs, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Discrimination, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Ethical Issues, Health Care/Long Term Care, Medicare, Science, State Cases, State Statutes/Regulations | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, April 20, 2015

Day 8 Report from the Iowa Sexual Assault/Dementia Trial

On Monday, April 20, prosecution and defense made closing arguments in the trial of State of Iowa v. Henry Rayhons, a former state legislator, for alleged sexual abuse of his wife with Alzheimer's.

KIMT.Com's twitter account has photos combined with excerpts from the arguments, here

Over the weekend, reporter Sarah Boden at Iowa Public Radio ran a report on the trial, with the podcast available here.

Bryan Gruley, whose detailed December 2014 feature article for Bloomberg News on the Rayhon couple's history and the charges, remains the best account of the anticipated issues, has written a follow-up story for Bloomberg News about the trial itself, pointing to the potential long-range impact from the case.  See today's Questions about Sex and Dementia Go to Jury for the First Time. 

As before, if new details become available on public media about the trial, including any jury verdict today, we'll capture them on this post, with an update.

UPDATE: According to Iowa media sources, the jury adjourned for the day about 5 p.m. central time, after approximately an hour and a half of deliberations, including two questions from the jury.  

April 20, 2015 in Cognitive Impairment, Crimes, Current Affairs, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Ethical Issues, Health Care/Long Term Care, State Cases, State Statutes/Regulations | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, April 17, 2015

Day 7 Report from the Iowa Sexual Assault/Dementia Trial

On  April 17, the trial continued in State of Iowa v. Henry Rayhons.  The evidence included:

  • Testimony by a Des Moines geriatrician, Robert Bender: Testified as an expert witness for the defense to explain that Alzheimer's patients often retain sexual desire, even after losing other brain functions such as speech or memory, and can make a "meaningful decision" to be intimate with the person.  According to the Des Moines Register, Dr. Bender testified that it would be a "medical mistake" for a doctor to draw an arbitrary line between allowing a patient to kiss and hug but not allowing her to have sex, unless there was evidence the patient was being harmed by the activity.

Further, the defendant Henry Rayhons testified, giving his memory of key events, stating he did not have "sexual intercourse" with his wife on the night in question, while also describing what he means by their "playing."  A  video segment of his trial testimony is available here. Additional print media coverage of the final day of testimony on Friday is available here

Additional audio-recording evidence was reportedly presented, from a care conference between Henry, his wife's daughters, and the nursing home staff at which the prosecution alleges Mr. Rayhons was advised of the doctor's conclusion about his wife's inability to consent to sexual activity.  Both parties rested their cases on Friday, and according to media reports, the trial is scheduled to resume on Monday, April 27, with closing arguments by both the prosecution and defense. 

As additional media reports from the trial today become available, I will supplement this post. 

Additional, more comprehensive coverage of the testimony of Henry Rayhons is provided by Bloomburg News' Brian Gruley in Sex with your Wife or Rape? Husband of Alzheimer's Patient Takes the Stand.

In addition, Bloomberg News has "Let's Talk About Sex ... in Nursing Homes," an infographic that charts state policies on sexual rights of nursing home residents and other relevant demographics on population aging.

April 17, 2015 in Cognitive Impairment, Crimes, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Ethical Issues, Health Care/Long Term Care, State Cases, State Statutes/Regulations | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, April 16, 2015

Day 6 Report from Iowa Sexual Assault-Dementia Trial

April 16, 2015 was the sixth day of trial in the criminal prosecution for sexual abuse in the third degree, in State of Iowa v. Henry Rayhons.  The prosecution completed its case-in-chief, the trial judge denied defense counsel's motion for judgment of acquittal, and the defense counsel called several witnesses for Mr. Rayhons.  Today's evidence, as described by various media sources linked below, included:

  • Final Witness for the Prosecution:  The state called a state criminologist to explain testing on various items of physical evidence,from the night in question.  According to media coverage of the trial, the criminologist  testified that "she did not find any seminal fluid in the sexual assault kit [on swabs from Donna taken on the night in question] but says that is not uncommon." She testified there "appeared to be a seminal fluid stain in the inside of Donna’s underwear," the same underwear that was alleged to have been deposited in a laundry hamper by the defendant on the night in question. Tests on the stain "detected DNA from [the defendant]."
  • The First Witness for the Defense, the "Roommate:" The woman who shared Donna Rayhons' room in the nursing home the night on question, was reported as testifying that  "Donna had become a good friend. Someone who she could count on to go to activities and speak with."  She is reported to have testified she’s "uncomfortable talking about that day but says she does remember something happening, but only assumed that it was sex on the other side of the curtain."
  • A Clinical Physician (and Assistant Professor of Medicine from the University of Iowa):  The defendant's expert witness is reported as having given opinion testimony to the effect that based on review of evidence, ""I believe Donna would've been more likely to give consent than not."
  • Patricia Wright, a Daughter of Donna Rayhons (called by the Defense): Reported as saying her mother "lit up" whenever Henry Rayhons entered the room.
  • The Son and Daughter of Henry Rayhons:  Describing their relationship with their father, their  father's relationship with Donna, and their own respect for Donna.

As described by the Globe Gazette, there appeared to be especially poignant testimony from one of Donna's daughters, Patricia: 

In July, Donna Lou Rayhons asked her daughter, Patricia Wright, if she had seen Henry. “He can’t come anymore,” Wright remembered her mother saying.

 

“Mom was talking very softly. Much more softly than she usually did and she kept putting her hand to her head. My impression was she was very sad,” Wright told the jury. “Then she would say things like ‘I love him. I love my girls. I love him. I love my girls.’ And she would say that kind of repeatedly.”

As more reports are published from the 6th day of the Rayhons trial, I will try to capture them here with a supplement to this Blog Post. 

UPDATE: Here is a link to a more detailed account of the trial testimony on Thursday from The Des Moines Register, explaining that Donna Rayhons had three daughters, including Patricia, from a prior marriage.  One of the other daughters testified for the prosecution.

April 16, 2015 in Cognitive Impairment, Crimes, Current Affairs, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Ethical Issues, Health Care/Long Term Care, State Cases, State Statutes/Regulations | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, April 15, 2015

Day 5 (the actual fifth day) of the Iowa Sexual Assault-Dementia Trial

On April 15, the trial  proceedings in State of Iowa v. Henry Rayhons continued, after a day without courtroom proceedings. 

The day started with testimony from an "Iowa DCI Agent" about a secret recording, two hours in length, that the agent made of his interview with Henry Rayhons on June 12, 2014, during which they discussed the couple's relationship and events surrounding the night of May 23, 2014 (the date of the alleged sexual abuse).  Reading between the lines of early news reports, it appears the prosecution was planning or wanted to play excerpts from the recording as part of its case-in-chief, and the defense lawyer took the position that if anything comes in, the whole recording comes into evidence.

Here's a KIMT.com  link to a story about this recording, including Rayhon's emotional reaction to the playing of the recording in the courtroom.   Here's a link to KIMT's live twitter posts on the trial. 

The above was available from the morning session of court.  More updates on later  proceedings will be posted here, if additional information on today's session becomes available. 

Here is an "update" from news media in Iowa, focusing on alleged details from the tape-recorded interview by the DCI (Department of Criminal Investigations) Agent with Henry Rayhons a few days after the night in question.  The prosecution appears to be offering segments as evidence that Rayhons "confessed" during the interview, while other segments appear to show his confusion and lack of awareness (or perhaps understanding) about the doctor's diagnosis. 

I'm not clear whether this "interview" triggered Miranda warnings, or whether they were waived, but it appears the agent did not tell Rayhons it was being recorded.

More and more lessons seem to be emerging, regardless of the eventual verdict in this case.  The more I hear of details from the trial, the more it amazes me how a March 2014 admission to a care facility, that apparently followed the daughters' reasonable concerns about the behavior of the wife, can fail to involve deeper family counseling, discussion and support for both the wife and the husband. This was a dramatic change in their relationship. My head is spinning with all of the missed opportunities for counseling, and, if necessary, mediation.

I'm seeing far more time spent on a criminal investigation about the night of May 23, 2014, than on counseling a 78-year-old man about what it might mean to have a wife in a nursing home in Iowa, where there are Iowa-specific laws about sexual conduct between married partners no longer cohabiting. I'm thinking the wife's daughters could have been assisted by sensitive counseling as well, both before and after March 23. But, I also suspect that there is no Medicare or insurance "billing code" for counseling the family members in this scenario. 

And finally, here is late-day coverage by the Des Moines Register from the trial, also focusing on the investigator's recording: Rayhons told investigator he didn't force sex on wife.

April 15, 2015 in Cognitive Impairment, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Ethical Issues, Health Care/Long Term Care, State Cases, State Statutes/Regulations | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Monday, April 13, 2015

Day 4 Report on Iowa Sexual Assault-Dementia Trial

On April 13, the fourth day of the trial of State of Iowa v. Henry Rayhons, the prosecution continued presenting evidence in the state's case-in-chief.  Here are links to news sources covering the day's events, including:

  • From KIMT.com: Testimony of a physician from the care facility regarding his opinion regarding  Donna's mental capacity, plus a description of video surveillance of the husband on the night in question, in which "you can see Donna being redirected to her room by Henry, after she had wandered through the halls.  Nearly  30 minutes later, Henry is seen leaving the room [and depositing her underwear in a hamper]."
  • From KIMT's Twitter feed: Excerpts of testimony from nurses and several staff members at the care center, including a report that a Care Center physician testified that "Just like an infant, a person can respond to stimuli. That doesn't involve any consent given."
  • From the Des Moines Register: Reporting that a total of three doctors testified today and that "Dr. John Brady, who is medical director of Concord Care Center, testified that Donna Rayhons had severe dementia caused by Alzheimer's disease. He said any positive reaction to her husband's affectionate advances could be termed a 'primal response,' not a conscious decision to reciprocate."

Further, from the Des Moines Register, an account of the testimony of one of the physicians, a neurologist: "One of the doctors, neurologist Alireza Yarahmadi, disputed any notion that such an Alzheimer's patient could vary greatly in her ability to understand what was going on around her. 'When they're severe, they're going to stay severe,' Yarahmadi testified." 

The trial is expected to continue on Wednesday, April 15 (corrected, after learning no proceedings on Tuesday).

April 13, 2015 in Cognitive Impairment, Crimes, Current Affairs, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Ethical Issues, State Cases, State Statutes/Regulations | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)