Friday, August 28, 2015

Webinar-Dementia-Friendly Communities

I had  blogged previously about the White House Conference on Aging (WHCOA) and the topic of dementia-friendly cities.  The Administrative for Community Living (ACL) is offering a webinar on September 1 at 4 p.m. edt on Dementia-Friendly Communities.  The announcement describes the webinar:

Join the National Alzheimer’s and Dementia Resource Center for a webinar on creating communities that are safe and respectful, provide support, and work toward quality of life for people living with dementia and their families.

Webinar participants will learn about key concepts related to Dementia Friendly Communities and hear from community leaders putting  these concepts into action.

The registration page is no longer taking registrations but hopefully there will be an archive of the webinar for those of us unable to attend. The National Alzheimer's and Dementia Resource Center was formerly known as the Alzheimer's Disease Supportive Services Program.

August 28, 2015 in Cognitive Impairment, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Webinars | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, August 27, 2015

Webinar on Effective Guardianship Practice

Dr. Brenda Ukert of the National Center for State Courts will be speaking on September 2, 2015 at a webinar on How to Protect our Nation's Most Vulnerable Adults through Effective Guardianship Practices. The one hour webinar starts at 1 PM edt.  The registration page describes the webinar:

Adult guardianship cases are some of the most complex cases handled in civil and probate courts.  While each state differs in qualifications, processes, and monitoring requirements, there are standards that can guide your court in developing robust practices that enhance both court efficiencies and oversight.  This webinar, based on NACM’s Adult Guardianship Guide, provides action steps courts can take to improve guardianship practices.  Concrete examples of innovative approaches and collaborative efforts will be highlighted.  Consideration will be given to the level of resources available to the court.

To register for the webinar, click here. The guide referenced in the webinar description is available here.

August 27, 2015 in Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Webinars | Permalink | Comments (0)

Justice in Aging: Analyzing Training of Workers Who Assist People with Dementia

Justice in Aging offers  a very interesting examination of training standards for the broad array of persons who assist or care for persons with dementia, including volunteers and professionals working in health care facilities or emergency services. The series of 5 papers is titled "Training to Serve People with Dementia: Is Our Health Care System Ready?" The Alzheimer's Association provided support for the study.

The papers include:  

To further whet your appetite for digging into the well written and organized papers, key findings indicate that "most dementia training requirements focus on facilities serving people with dementia," rather than recognizing care and services are frequently provided in the home.  Further there is "vast" variation from state to state regarding the extent of training required or available, and in any licensing standards.  The reports specifically address the need for training for first responders who work outside the traditional definition of "health care," including law enforcement, investigative and emergency personnel. 

If you need an example of why dementia-specific training is needed for law enforcement, including supervisors and staff at jails, see the facts contained in Goodman v. Kimbrough, reported earlier on this Blog.    

 

August 27, 2015 in Cognitive Impairment, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Ethical Issues, Health Care/Long Term Care, Housing, State Cases, State Statutes/Regulations | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, August 26, 2015

"Sixty-five is the New Sixty-four!"

Recently I was listening to satellite radio while on the road, and caught a Fresh Air interview with Robert Price, celebrated author of hardscrabble crime fiction, including Clockers (2008)and his most recent novel The Whites (2015).  Is it my imagination, or are "older adults" appearing more and more often in mainstream fiction and movies?  Apparently a central character in The Whites is just such an "senior."  In Price's interview, I was struck by the humor of his observations about how growing older himself has influenced his writing, but also about much his grandparents' lives affected his fiction.  And I couldn't help but laugh when he observed that no one likes the "math" as you get older, although he is now the first to admit that "65 is the new 64."  Here's a link to the 44 minute podcast with Terry Gross. 

August 26, 2015 in Books, Cognitive Impairment, Crimes, Current Affairs, Dementia/Alzheimer’s | Permalink | Comments (0)

Medicare Learning Network Call on Dementia Care

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) provides the Medicare Learning Network (MLN). MLN provides, among other things, articles, trainings, and national provider calls. The next national provider call is scheduled for September 3, 2015 at 1:30 p.m. edt on the National Partnership to Improve Dementia Care and QAPI. Here is the description of this call

During this MLN Connects® National Provider Call, two nursing homes share how they successfully implemented person-centered care approaches and overcame the barriers of cost and staff. Additionally, CMS subject matter experts update you on the progress of the National Partnership and Quality Assurance and Performance Improvement (QAPI). A question and answer session follows the presentations.

The National Partnership to Improve Dementia Care in Nursing Homes and QAPI are partnering on MLN Connects Calls to broaden discussions related to quality of life, quality of care, and safety issues. The National Partnership was developed to improve dementia care in nursing homes through the use of individualized, comprehensive care approaches to reduce the use of unnecessary antipsychotic medications. QAPI standards expand the level and scope of quality activities to ensure that facilities continuously identify and correct quality deficiencies and sustain performance improvement.

Should you register for this program?  The intended audience is "[c]onsumer and advocacy groups, nursing home providers, surveyor community, prescribers, professional associations, and other interested stakeholders." So, if you fall into one of those groups, the answer is yes, you should register. Registration information is available here.

More information about the National Partnership to Improve Dementia Care in Nursing Homes is available here.

August 26, 2015 in Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Federal Statutes/Regulations, Health Care/Long Term Care, Medicare, Programs/CLEs, Webinars | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, August 24, 2015

Must Courts Honor Alleged Incapacitated Person's Nominee for Guardian?

In a recent guardianship case reviewed by the North Dakota Supreme Court, the alleged incapacitated person (AIP), a woman suffering "mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease and dementia," did not challenge the need for an appointed representative, but proposed two friends, rather than any relatives, to serve as her co-guardians.  The lower court rejected her proposal, finding that a niece, in combination with a bank, was better able to serve as her court-appointed guardian/conservator. 

On appeal, the AIP challenged the outcome on the grounds that the court had made no findings that she was without sufficient capacity to choose her own guardians.  In The Matter of Guardianship of B.K.J., decided on July 30, 2015, the ND Supreme Court affirmed the appointment of the niece, concluding that although state law requires consideration of the AIP's "preference," no special findings of incapacity were necessary to reject that preference. 

Contrary to [the AIP's] argument [State law] does not require the district court to make a specific finding that a person is of insufficient mental capacity to make an intelligent choice regarding appointing a guardian.  While it might have been helpful to have a specific finding, we will not reverse so long as the district court did not abuse its discretion in appointing a guardian.... Here, it is clear the district court was not of the opinion [that the AIP] acted with or has sufficient capacity to make an intelligent choice.  Rather, the district court's findings noted [she] testified that she did not trust [her niece] anymore, but was unable to recall why . . . .

Decisions such as these can be inherently difficult to manage, at least in the early stages, especially if the AIP is unlikely to cooperate with the decision-making of the "better" appointed guardian. 

August 24, 2015 in Cognitive Impairment, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Estates and Trusts, Ethical Issues, Property Management, State Cases, State Statutes/Regulations | Permalink | Comments (2)

Thursday, August 20, 2015

Dementia At An Earlier Age?

The Washington Post ran an article about a recent study that people are now developing dementia at a younger age than in decades past. People are developing dementia earlier and dying of it more, a study shows discusses a study that was published in Surgical Neurology International. The Post story notes that the study was reported in the London Times in the story, Dementia Victims Are Getting Younger.  The Post article notes that "[s]cientists quoted in the study said a combination of environmental factors such as pollution from aircraft and cars as well as widespread use of pesticides could be the culprit, the newspaper reported." The leader of the study was quoted:

The rate of increase in such a short time suggested a silent or even a hidden epidemic, in which environmental factors must play a major part, not just aging...[and] no single factor was to blame, but instead [the study leader] blamed the interaction between different chemicals and varying types of pollution.

Other experts disagree with the finding, according to the Post article, referencing the Times article.  One expert noted that" death rates for cancer and heart disease could account for the spike in deaths from neurological disease since people 'had to die of something.'" Another expert was quoted that "[w]e can’t conclude that modern life is causing these conditions at a younger age....We know that Alzheimer’s and other dementias can have a complex interplay of risk factors.”

The study, Neurological deaths of American adults (55–74) and the over 75's by sex compared with 20 Western countries 1989–2010: Cause for concern is available here.

August 20, 2015 in Cognitive Impairment, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, International | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, August 18, 2015

Federal Court Applies "Doctrine of Reasonable Expectations" to Long-Term Care Insurance Policy

An interesting dispute is moving forward in federal court in California, involving interpretation of coverage under a long-term care insurance (LTCI) policy.   The case is Gutowitz v. Transamerica Life Insurance Company, (Case No. 2:14-cv-06656-MMM) in the Central District of California.   UPDATE: link to Order dated August 14, 2015. 

In 1991, plaintiff Erwin Gutowitz purchased a long-term care insurance policy, allegedly requesting the "highest level of long-term care coverage available," and presumably paying the annual premiums for more than 20 years.  Eventually, following a 2013 diagnosis of Alzheimer's, Erwin Gutowitz needed assistance, moving into an apartment at Aegis Living of Ventura, which was licensed in California as a "Residential Care Facility for the Elderly" (an RCFE).  With the help of his son as his designated health care agent, he then made a claim for long-term care benefits under his policy.  The claim was denied by Transamerica on the ground that the location was not a "nursing home" as defined in the LTCI policy.  

Insurers understandably prefer not to pay claims if they can avoid doing so.  In this case the insurer attempted to avoid the claim on the grounds that only certain types of facilities (or a higher level of care) were covered under this policy's "Daily Nursing Home Benefit." 

On August 14, 2015, United States District Judge Margaret Morrow issued a comprehensive (34 page) order, copy linked above, denying key arguments made by Transamerica in its summary judgment motions.

Continue reading

August 18, 2015 in Cognitive Impairment, Consumer Information, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Ethical Issues, Federal Cases, Health Care/Long Term Care, Housing, State Cases, State Statutes/Regulations | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, August 16, 2015

2015 National Aging & Law Conference

The National Aging & Law Conference is scheduled for October 29-30, 2015 at the Hilton Arlington, Arlington, VA. A number of ABA commissions and divisions are sponsors of this conference including the Commission on Legal Problems of the Elderly, the Coordinating Committee on Veterans Benefits & Services, the Senior Lawyers Division and the Real Property, Trust & Estate Law Section.  The website describes the conference

The 2015 National Aging and Law Conference (NALC) will bring together substantive law, policy, and legal service development and delivery practitioners from across the country.  The program will include sessions on Medicare, Medicaid, guardianship, elder abuse, legal ethics, legal service program development and delivery, consumer law, income security, and other issues.

The 2015 National Aging and Law Conference marks the second year that this conference has been hosted by the American Bar Association. This year’s agenda will include 24 workshops and 4 plenary sessions on key topics in health care, income security, elder abuse, alternatives to guardianship, consumer law, and  legal service development and delivery.  The focus of the agenda is on issues impacting law to moderate income Americans age 60 and over and the front line advocates that serve them. 

The agenda is available here. To register, click here.  Early bird registration ends August 28, 2015.

               

August 16, 2015 in Advance Directives/End-of-Life, Cognitive Impairment, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Discrimination, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Ethical Issues, Federal Statutes/Regulations, Health Care/Long Term Care, Housing, Medicaid, Medicare, Programs/CLEs, Social Security, Veterans | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, August 14, 2015

Dementia-Friendly America

At the 2015 White House Conference on Aging on July 13, 2015, during the discussion from the first panel on Empowering All Generations: Elder Justice in the Twenty-First Century, one panelist from Minnesota mentioned dementia-friendly communities and the Dementia-Friendly America initiative.  Six cities were mentioned as examples. Minnesota has a website that offers many tools on making a community dementia-friendly or dementia-capable. A dementia-capable community is "[a] dementia capable community is informed, safe and respectful of individuals with the disease, their families and caregivers and provides supportive options that foster quality of life."  The toolkit is available here

August 14, 2015 in Cognitive Impairment, Current Affairs, Dementia/Alzheimer’s | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, August 10, 2015

Will "Single Seniors" Change the Face of Long-Term Living and Supports?

The Public Policy Institute (PPI) of California recently profiled demographic changes likely to affect that state in coming decades, including the impact of a projected increase, to 20%, of the proportion of the population aged 65+.  One especially interesting component is the impact of seniors who are likely to be "single," especially those without the assistance of  children, spouses, or other close family members, a trend that seems likely to be true nationwide. From PPI's report (minus charts and footnotes):

Family structures in this age group will also change considerably—in particular, marital status will look quite different among seniors in 2030 than it does today.... The fastest projected rates of growth are among the divorced/separated and never married groups. Between 2012 and 2030, the number of married people over age 65 will increase by 75 percent—but the number who are divorced or separated will increase by 115 percent, and the number who are never married will increase by 210 percent....

 

Another significant change will be in the number of seniors who have children. Those who have never been married are much less likely to have children than those who have been married at some point. As a result, seniors in the future will be more likely to be childless than those today.... In 2012, just 12 percent of 75-year-old women had no children. We project that by 2030, nearly 20 percent will be childless. Since we know that adult children often provide care for their senior parents, these projections suggest that alternative non-family sources of care will become more common in the future.

Thus, just as we're making noise about supporting seniors' preference to "age at home," we may be over-assuming that family members will be available to provide key care without direct cost to the states.  Hmmm.  That's problematic, right?

More from the California PPI report, including some conclusions: 

California's senior population will grow rapidly over the next two decades, increasing by an estimated 87 percent, or four million people.  This population will be more diverse and less likely to be married or have children than senior are today.  The policy implications of an aging population are wide-ranging.  We estimate that about one million seniors will have some difficulties with self-care, and that more than 100,000 will require nursing home care. To ensure nursing home populations do not increase beyond this number, the state will need to pursue policies that provide resources to allow more people to age in their own homes....

 

The [California In-Home Service & Supports] IHSS program provides resources for seniors to hire workers, including family members, to provide support with personal care, household work, and errands. One benefit of hiring family members is that they may provide more culturally competent care. Medi-Cal is already the primary payer for nursing home residents, and the state could potentially save money by providing more home- and community-based services that support people as they age, helping to keep them out of institutions. Finally, the projected growth in nursing home residents and in seniors with self-care limitations will require a larger health care workforce. California’s community college system will be a critical resource in training qualified workers focused on the senior population.

The San Diego Union-Tribune follows up on this theme in California Will Have More Seniors Living Alone, by Joshua Stewart.

August 10, 2015 in Consumer Information, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Ethical Issues, Federal Statutes/Regulations, Health Care/Long Term Care, Housing, Medicaid, Retirement, State Statutes/Regulations, Statistics | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, August 7, 2015

Pennsylvania Names Nursing Home "Quality of Care" Task Force

In the wake of devastating reports about poor accountability following inspections of nursing homes in Pennsylvania under a previous governor, plus a new civil lawsuit filed by the Pennsylvania Attorney General's office, the current Pennsylvania Secretary of Health has announced a state task force to study certain issues. 

According to the state press release, the task force "will be charged with identifying ways the department can advance quality improvement in Pennsylvania's long-term care facilities. The goal is to review current regulations and identify areas that the department may improve to ensure that nursing homes are operating at the highest level regarding the quality and safety of their residents."'

The Secretary's office indicates that in addition to "members of the Governor's Office, the secretaries of the Pennsylvania departments of Aging, Human Services, and State," appointed task force members include:

Jaqueline Zinn, PhD - Temple University (Business School)
Mary Naylor, PhD, FAAN, RN - University of Pennsylvania (Nursing, Gerontology)
Steven Handler, MD - University of Pittsburgh (Medical School, Biometric Informatics)
Rachel Werner, MD, PhD - University of Pennsylvania (Medical School, Quality of Care)
Dana Mukamel, PhD – University of California, Irvine (Public Health, Quality of Care)
David Grabowski PhD - Harvard University (Medical School, Health Care Policy)
Barbara Bowers RN, PhD, FAAN - University of Wisconsin (Institute of Aging, Long Term Care)
Pennsylvania State Senator Pat Vance 
Pennsylvania State Representative Mathew Baker

On the positive side, it is good to see non-Pennsylvanians appointed to the team, all with excellent credentials.  Perhaps on the less positive side, it seems to be a very large team, made up mostly of very prominent but busy "volunteers," two factors which in my experience can reduce efficiency. 

For news accounts of the potential political factors that may be play in this recent history, see here and related articles linked below. 

August 7, 2015 in Consumer Information, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Ethical Issues, Health Care/Long Term Care, Housing, State Cases, State Statutes/Regulations | Permalink

Monday, August 3, 2015

New Report: Intellectual & Developmental Disability & Dementia

The Administration for Community Living (ACL) has posted a new report on its website. The July 2015 report was prepared by RTI International  pursuant to a contract with ACL. The report is titled IDD and Dementia. The executive summary explains in part:

The National Plan to Address Alzheimer’s Disease (2014) calls for a coordinated effort to develop workforces in aging, public health, and intellectual and developmental disabilities that are dementia-capable and culturally-competent. In response to this directive, the U.S. Administration on Community Living presents the findings and resources in this white paper to community of providers who primarily serve older adults. It provides a broad overview of the services and support system for persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) affected by dementia and their caregivers, examples of cross-network initiatives, and resources for improving dementia care across agencies and organizations that serve this population.

This white paper presents the current state of services and support system for persons with IDD who have dementia. There is recognition in the aging and IDD networks that states are in a transition period where the future of services will be more person-centered and focused on integration in the community (see Appendix A).

The report is divided into 9 sections with section 4 looking at screening, diagnosis and treatment; section 5 looking at services and financing; and section 6 looking at efforts to improve community-based services.  Section 7, the conclusion, includes a brief discussion of 5 issues:

  • Is dementia awareness education available to the IDD population and service providers?
  • Do the information and assistance services in both the aging and IDD networks identify those individuals with IDD and dementia and their caregivers who contact them?
  • Are persons with IDD and dementia being referred for appropriate diagnosis?
  • Are program eligibility and resource allocations taking into account the impact of cognitive disabilities on an aging population of persons with IDD?
  • Are the dementia-capable home and community-based services available to the general population capable of serving persons with IDD and dementia?

The report is available here.

August 3, 2015 in Cognitive Impairment, Consumer Information, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Health Care/Long Term Care | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, July 31, 2015

Update on Family Caregivers

AARP''s Public Policy Institute has released a new report that provides an update on the topic of family caregivers. Valuing the Invaluable 2015 Update: Undeniable Progress, but Big Gaps Remain is 25 pages long and available as a pdf. As the introduction notes:

In 2013, about 40 million family caregivers in the United States provided an estimated 37 billion hours of care to an adult with limitations in daily activities. The estimated economic value of their unpaid contributions  was approximately$470 billion in 2013, up from an estimated $450 billion in 2009.

This report also explains the key challenges facing family caregivers…The report highlights the growing importance of family caregiving on the public policy agenda. It lists key policy developments for family caregivers since the last Valuing the Invaluable report was released in 2011. Finally, the report recommends ways to better recognize and explicitly support caregiving families through public policies, private sector initiatives, and research.

The report reviews progress in policies, programs and services at the federal and state levels since the previous report and makes over 20 policy recommendations in a number of categories.

To both address the growing care gap as the population ages and lessen the strain in the daily lives of caregiving families, more meaningful public policies and private sector initiatives are needed now. Better strategies will assist those who need care and their families struggling to find and afford the supportive services to live in their homes and communities—where they want to stay. It is essential to the well-being of our health care and LTSS systems, our economy, our workplaces, our families, and ourselves.

July 31, 2015 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Federal Statutes/Regulations, Health Care/Long Term Care | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, July 30, 2015

California Lawsuit Over Alzhemier's Research Reveals Core University Funding Battle

As detailed in new stories in Southern California media, an important suit by University of California San Diego (UCSD) against University of Southern California (USC) highlights a battle between public and private research enterprises.  Control over millions of dollars is stake for Alzheimer's-related research.  From the San Diego Union-Tribune in a Sunday feature article by Larry Gordon, Gary Robbins and Bradley Fikes:

In the lawsuit, U.C. San Diego alleges that USC, [Alzheimer's researcher Paul] Aisen and eight colleagues conspired to take research data involving more than 1,000 patients and other assets, including an estimated $100 million in federal and private funding to a new Alzheimer's study center in the San Diego Area.  Aisen and USC deny any wrongdoing and contend that UC San Diego is trying to inhibit the freedom to move jobs and is threatening the data's security.

 

A Superior Court judge in San Diego last week denied USC's request to block UC San Diego's access to that data.

 

Richard Seligman, the associate vice president for research administration at Caltech who has more than four decades of experience dealing with grants, said he had never heard of such a lawsuit even though competition for grants and noted faculty has gotten more fierce.

Stakeholders interested in the outcome of the research are reported to be taking note of the suit, with Mary Carrillo, the chief science officer for the Alzheimer's Association quoted as saying the association wants a "speedy resolution" of the lawsuit to keep research going forward. 

Left in an uncomfortable middle ground are the National Institutes of Health and its subsidiary National Institute on Aging, which provides about $11 million per year to the UC Alzheimer's Center.  While confirming that UC San Diego still holds that grant, officials at those agencies said they must approve whether funding like that stays put or moves to another school with a principal investigator like Aisen.

For additional background on the lawsuit, see a related Los Angeles Times piece here.  Reporters from the Los Angeles Times and the San Diego Union-Tribune have collaborated on these stories.

On Friday, July 24, a California trial court ruled that the key research data must be returned to UCSD and therefore does not go "with" the faculty member, Aisen, recruited away from San Diego by USC.  Details here. 

As further evidence of the battle for primacy in southern California medical research, USC and UCSD have each courted the La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology, with University of California-San Diego energing as the winning suitor for "affiliation."  Details here

July 30, 2015 in Cognitive Impairment, Current Affairs, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Ethical Issues, Science, State Cases | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, July 24, 2015

Huguette Clark Family Foundation Announces Grant for Study of Elder Exploitation

From the ABA Bifocal, details about the 2015 award of a $50k grant by the Huguette Clark Family Fund for Protection of Elders to develop model civil statutes covering elder financial exploitation:

The project will be managed by the National Center for Victims of Crime under the guidance of Executive Director Mai Fernandez. Lori Stiegel of the American Bar Association Commission on Law and Aging will serve as a consultant on the project. Ms. Stiegel, a senior attorney, joined the ABA Commission in 1989 and has developed and directed its work on elder abuse.

 

“Creating a template of civil statutory provisions for elder financial exploitation is a short- term, innovative project that can have a lasting impact,” Ms. Fernandez said. “It can give attorneys an effective tool for pursuing civil cases and provide victims with the greatest chance to recover stolen assets. We welcome the support of the Huguette Clark Family Fund for Protection of Elders on this important project.”

The news release explains the donor-advised fund was established by the family in 2013 to honor the late Huguette Clark, "who was victimized by her caregivers for more than two decades."  Previous recipients of grants from the Huguette Clark Fund include San Diego State University and the Philadelphia Corporation on Aging.

July 24, 2015 in Cognitive Impairment, Crimes, Current Affairs, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Estates and Trusts, Ethical Issues, Grant Deadlines/Awards | Permalink | Comments (0)

From SSRN: "Abuse of Elders with Mental Illness" by Prof. James T.R. Jones

Professor James T.R. Jones continues to bring his unique and important perspective to bear in his latest work available on SSRN.  In Abuse of Elders with Mental Illness: Generally an International and Specifically a United States Perspective, he highlights the ways in which various types of mental illness may contribute to unique vulnerability to abuse as the individuals age.  This is a chapter from a new book, International and Comparative Law on the Rights of Older Persons edited by Ralph Ruebner, Teresa Do and Amy Taylor published by Vandeplas Publishing in May 2015. From the SSRN abstract on Professor Jones' chapter:

Elder abuse is a major international problem, and scandal.  It is so important that both the United Nations (“UN”) and the World Health Organization (“WHO”) have focused on it.  Elder abuse occurs in a variety of ways.  It can be physical abuse due to either active injury or passive neglect.  It can be psychological abuse through fear and intimidation.  It can be financial abuse due to theft or fraud.  Abusers can be strangers; healthcare workers, too often in nursing home settings; and spouses, partners, children, grandchildren, or other relatives.  Abusers may be motivated by cruelty, laziness, or greed for quick profit or a premature inheritance.



While all elders can be abused, those with mental illness are particularly vulnerable.  This group can encompass both those with longstanding mental illnesses such as major depression, schizophrenia, and bipolar disorder and those psychiatrically debilitated by age, notably including those who suffer from Alzheimer’s disease or other forms of dementia.  Victims may be living in private residential settings both alone and with family or friends or in institutions such as nursing homes.



This chapter gives a brief overview of elder abuse and then focuses on the victim population of those vulnerable because of mental illness and how they face abuse.  It discusses possible ways to reduce the incidence of abuse of those with psychiatric conditions including, among other things, mandatory abuse reporting and enhanced focus on the problem by government, in particular law enforcement, authorities and primary care and mental health care providers.

The book is another important product from John Marshall Law's summer 2014 forum examining the rights of older persons, leading to the summer' "Chicago Declaration on the Rights of Older Persons" presented before the United Nations' working session on aging.   

 

July 24, 2015 in Books, Cognitive Impairment, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Discrimination, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Ethical Issues, International | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, July 21, 2015

Book: One-Stop Guide to Dementia

A new book from the U.K. by June Andrews is titled Dementia: The One-Stop Guide, and it offers practical advice for families, professionals, and people living with dementia and Alzheimer's Disease. The Table of Contents suggests the scope:

  1. What is dementia?
  2. Getting a diagnosis
  3. Adjusting to the news: for carers
  4. Adjusting to the news: for people with dementia
  5. What are friends for?
  6. Managing care at home
  7. Disturbing Behaviours
  8. Your dementia-friendly home
  9. What you should expect from the social care system
  10. What you should expect from the NHS
  11. The dangers of a hospital admission and how to avoid them
  12. Some important legal issues
  13. What to look for in a care home
  14. Advice on complaints and sample letter

I wonder how Chapters  9 and 10 would be written from a U.S. perspective?

 

July 21, 2015 in Books, Cognitive Impairment, Current Affairs, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Ethical Issues, Health Care/Long Term Care, International | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, July 20, 2015

Register for Webinar: Living Alone with Dementia

The Administration for Community Living (ACL)/Administration on Aging (AoA) announced an upcoming webinar, People Who Live Alone with Dementia. The webinar is offered by the National Alzheimer’s and Dementia Resource Center (formerly the ADSSP National Resource Center). The website describes this July 30th webinar as follows:

 The webinar will focus on the issue of Persons Living Alone with Dementia. Participants will learn about prevalence and characteristics of people with dementia who live alone, signs of self-neglect and intervention strategies, and the experiences of people with dementia who live alone. Dr. Penny Harris and Dr. Michael Lepore will present at this webinar.

The webinar starts at 3 p.m. edt and lasts for one hour. To register for this free webinar, click here.

July 20, 2015 in Cognitive Impairment, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Housing, Programs/CLEs, Webinars | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sexuality and Incapacity: A Forthcoming Article

Professor Alexander  Boni-Saenz at Chicago-Kent College of Law recently emailed me about his forthcoming article, Sexuality and Incapacity.  The article is posted to his SSRN page and will be published in volume 76 of the Ohio State Law Journal.   The abstract explains

Sexual incapacity doctrines are perhaps the most important form of sexual regulation, as they control access to sex by designating who is legally capable of consenting to sex. Most states have adopted sexual incapacity tests for adults that focus narrowly on assessing an individual’s cognitive abilities.  These tests serve an important protective function for people with temporary cognitive impairments, such as those rendered incapable due to alcohol or drugs.  However, this comes at the cost of barring many people with persistent cognitive impairments, such as Down Syndrome or Alzheimer’s Disease, from any sexual activity.  This is despite the fact that they still have sexual desires and are able to engage in sexual decision-making with support from caregiving networks.  The central claim of this Article is that sexual incapacity doctrine should grant legal capacity to adults with persistent cognitive impairments if they are embedded in an adequate decision-making support network.  In other words, the right to sexual expression should not be withheld due to cognitive impairment alone.  To justify this claim, the Article provides a theory of sexual incapacity doctrine that is grounded in the practice of supported decision-making and the normative foundations of sexual capability and relational autonomy.  The Article then sets forth a novel test for sexual consent capacity: cognition-plus.  This test focuses on gauging the capacity for volition, assessing the mental capacity of the individual to understand the nature and consequences of the sexual decision, and evaluating the adequacy of the decision-making support system using principles of fiduciary law.  The Article concludes by applying the cognition-plus test to the case of older adults with dementia, a group of increasing importance with the aging of the population.

A draft of the paper is available as a pdf from the SSRN page of  Professor Boni-Saenz.  Thanks to Professor Boni-Saenz for letting me know about his article!

July 20, 2015 in Cognitive Impairment, Current Affairs, Dementia/Alzheimer’s | Permalink | Comments (0)