Wednesday, June 8, 2016

Good News in Fighting Frauds

Hopefully none of the readers of this blog have ever been a victim of a consumer scam, had their identities stolen, or know someone who has been a victim. That said, it is unfortunately likely that we all know someone who has been a victim of a scam. But there is good news on an international front regarding a scam that required victims to send money in order to claim their "winnings".

An article about efforts from U.S. and Dutch law enforcement efforts explain that FIOD and US DoJ conduct simultaneous operations against worldwide multi-million euro fraud with false letters. The article explains Dutch law enforcement is seizing mail from 300 mailboxes and is investigating 6 companies. At the same time DOJ filed suit "against two of the suspected companies and one director in the Netherlands, on behalf of hundreds of thousands of victims." Here's how this scam worked

[T]he main suspects sent millions of letters to people in the United States, Great Britain, Switzerland, Italy, France, Japan and many more countries. In the letters, addressed to people personally, the recipients were made to believe that they had won an award in the amount of money or a check, which they had not claimed yet. Another example was that the sender of the letter intended to give money to the recipient as an act of charity. In addition, letters were sent which stated that the recipient was a guaranteed winner in a lottery. To be able to transfer the money to the recipient, the latter had to send a cash amount of between 20 and 45 euro or a cheque, each time to a mailbox in the Netherlands.

In various letters, approximately 300 different mailbox numbers in the Netherlands were mentioned. Allegedly, the six suspected Dutch companies, which are the subject of the FIOD-investigation manage a large part of the mailboxes, empty them and process the mail. Presumably, the companies were allowed to keep part of the money as payment for services rendered, but the larger part of the money was transferred to bank accounts, which allegedly belonged to the main suspects of the fraud.

The DOJ press release is available here which also includes a link to the complaint filed in federal court.  Kudos to U.S. DOJ and to the Dutch law enforcement agency for excellent work!

 

June 8, 2016 in Consumer Information, Crimes, Current Affairs, Federal Cases, International | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, June 7, 2016

Health Care Debt and Debt Collectors: "Is This How My Life Will End?"

John Oliver, in his typically over-the-top, but still informative manner, focuses on the industry of debt collection and how it can be especially troublesome for older adults.  Indeed, when I was running an Elder Protection Clinic for Dickinson Law, a significant percentage of our clients were struggling with "old" debts, often connected to health care costs, and were dealing with aggressive attempts to recover what has come to be known as  "zombie debt."  One woman interviewed about $80k in debt arising out of denial for insurance coverage for her elderly husband's hospitalization for breathing problems, describes her fear and frustration after a lifetime of working and saving.  She asks, "Is this how my life is going to end?"

 

 

Our thanks to Karen Miller, Esq., in Florida, for sending this link.  

June 7, 2016 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Ethical Issues, Health Care/Long Term Care, Retirement, Statistics | Permalink | Comments (0)

Disasters Know No Season, Plan Now

As Tropical Storm Colin pounds through Florida on its way northeast, it is a good reminder to all of us to have a disaster plan in place. Although the type of disaster may be somewhat geographic, a disaster plan is especially important for elders and individuals with special needs.  Here are some links to helpful websites with information about disaster planning for elders and individuals with special needs.

FEMA and here

American Red Cross

Ready.gov

Administration for Community Living

June 7, 2016 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Other | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, June 6, 2016

Family Assistance & HCBS Medicaid

Justice in Aging (formerly known to many of us as the National Senior Citizens Law Center) covered a timely and important topic in their May, 2016 Issue Brief. Voluntary Means Voluntary: Coordinating Medicaid HCBS with Family Assistance was authored by Eric Carlson, well know nationally for his work regarding residents of long term care facilities. The issue brief runs 8 pages. Here is the executive summary: 

When an older adult can no longer can live independently, and is eligible for Medicaid, he or she often qualifies for home and community-based services (HCBS) that enable the individual to stay at home, rather than move to a nursing facility or other health care institution. The same is true for persons with disabilities. HCBS are provided under a service plan; under federal Medicaid regulations effective since March 2014, those service plans cannot compel unpaid assistance by family members such as adult children.

As illustrated by Medicaid hearing decisions from Florida, however, state Medicaid programs (frequently through managed care organizations) often compel unpaid assistance from family members. The managed care organizations (MCOs) authorize service levels with the presumption that family members should be  providing a certain level of personal care assistance. This leads to a lower level of Medicaid-funded service hours, which in turn requires family members to provide assistance to cover the service gap.

One problem in Florida is a "medical necessity" definition that denies Medicaid-funded services to the extent that those services are provided for caregiver convenience. This definition has been cited by MCOs and hearing officers to justify reduced levels of services, even when the caregiver’s "convenience" is his or her need to hold employment outside the home. Furthermore, twelve other states also have a similar "caregiver convenience" provision in the state’s Medicaid medical necessity definition.

In Florida and across the country, Medicaid beneficiaries and their advocates should address this problem. Florida advocates have made some progress in this area, and the state now agrees that service authorizations should respect a family caregiver’s outside employment. The Florida experience suggests the type of advocacy that could and should be pursued in Florida and other states. In individual service requests and appeals, beneficiaries and advocates should forcefully assert the voluntariness requirement of the federal service planning regulations. On a systemic level, advocates should argue for the removal or revision of "caregiver convenience" provisions, and advocate for service authorization procedures that explicitly incorporate the voluntariness requirement.

This issue brief is a "must read" for all elderlaw profs, attorneys and other advocates.  A pdf of the issue brief is available here.

June 6, 2016 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Health Care/Long Term Care, Medicaid | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, June 3, 2016

Pew Research Center: The Demographics of Adult Children Living with Parents

The Pew Research Center reports that for the first time in the modern era, more adult children ages 18 through 34 are living with their parents than living in other arrangements:  

Broad demographic shifts in marital status, educational attainment and employment have transformed the way young adults in the U.S. are living, and a new Pew Research Center analysis of census data highlights the implications of these changes for the most basic element of their lives – where they call home. In 2014, for the first time in more than 130 years, adults ages 18 to 34 were slightly more likely to be living in their parents’ home than they were to be living with a spouse or partner in their own household.

It seems likely that this trend has long-range significance for both young adults and aging families.  

June 3, 2016 in Current Affairs, Housing, Statistics | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, June 2, 2016

Incentives to Delay In Claiming Social Security?

Periodically we post about an article on Social Security, and one of the hot topics of late is when to start drawing Social Security. Do you take Social Security early before you reach your full retirement age, do you wait until that magic number (66 for many) or do you delay taking Social Security to later, even age 70? When you start to claim your Social Security benefit does have ramifications. We have also seen articles about the future viability of the Social Security program.

The Wall Street Journal ran an article recently about a recently published paper on the topic. The article, Here’s How to Get More People to Delay Claiming Social Security offers a view of regarding making Social Security more viable.


Global aging paired with pension shortfalls have led many governments to raise retirement ages and cut benefits. But this approach tends to be unpopular, as demonstrated by loud protests we’ve seen over the last few years from Greece and France to Detroit and, soon, Puerto Rico.

The article explains that the authors offer this proposal to increase the solvency of Social Security by "replacing the current Social Security delayed retirement credit with a lump-sum payment would induce many people to voluntarily defer claiming their Social Security benefits, and many would work more."

In the article, the authors explain the study they conducted to see if their idea would have merit, and they explain that

What we learned from our study is that many people would be willing to claim later and work longer, if they can get the attractive partial buyout from Social Security. Additionally, many who had initially stated that they wanted their benefit as young as possible, were also most willing to delay and work longer when offered the partial buyout.

The authors explain their idea is designed to be "cost-neutral" thus not adding to the woes regarding Social Security's long term prospects. The authors also note that  "incentivizing longer work lives could lead to better mental and physical health at older ages for many people, so there could be ample positive social benefits."

The authors' paper is published on SSRN. Will They Take the Money and Work? An Empirical Analysis of People's Willingness to Delay Claiming Social Security Benefits for a Lump Sum. Here is the abstract for the paper:

This paper investigates whether exchanging the Social Security delayed retirement credit, currently paid as an increase in lifetime annuity benefits, for a lump sum would induce later claiming and additional work. We show that people would voluntarily claim about half a year later if the lump sum were paid for claiming any time after the Early Retirement Age, and about two-thirds of a year later if the lump sum were paid only for those claiming after their Full Retirement Age. Overall, people will work one-third to one-half of the additional months, compared to the status quo. Those who would currently claim at the youngest ages are likely to be most responsive to the offer of a lump sum benefit.

 

June 2, 2016 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Retirement, Social Security | Permalink | Comments (1)

What Do People Do in Retirement?

Have a plan to retire? Know how you will spend your time? AgeWave, along with Bank of America Merrill Lynch did a study on how people spend their retirements. Beyond the Bucket List: Experience Leisure in a Whole New Way provides the highlights from the study.  

Huffington Post ran two blog posts that discussed the report. New Study Uncovers the Upside of Retirement Leisure: The Freedom Zone was published on May 12, 2016 and New Study Reveals Four Distinct Stages of Retirement Leisure on May 13, 2016. The report notes that people who are retired have more free time, but transitioning from work to retirement may be a challenge for some, since, according to the report, many folks work even when they are on vacation. The report discusses emotional well-being and the value of experience over acquisition. The report also discusses the importance of saving for retirement. The report identifies "4 stages of retirement leisure" from "winding down & gearing up" to "contentment & accommodation."

To read the full report, register with Merrill Lynch to download it.

June 2, 2016 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Health Care/Long Term Care, Retirement | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, June 1, 2016

More on Elder Driving

The latest issue of Experience, the magazine of the Senior Lawyers Division of the ABA is devoted to elder driving. Eight articles are devoted to the issue of driving. The magazine also includes articles on estate planning, technology and ethics. The entire issue is available here. Links to individual articles are also accessible from here.

June 1, 2016 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Estates and Trusts, Ethical Issues, State Statutes/Regulations, Travel | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, May 31, 2016

American Society on Aging Call for Proposals

The annual American Society on Aging (ASA) conference is scheduled for March 20-24, 2017 in Chicago. The planning committee is now accepting proposals to present at the conference.  For more information or to submit a proposal, click here. The deadline for submitting a proposal is June 30, 2017.

May 31, 2016 in Advance Directives/End-of-Life, Cognitive Impairment, Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Health Care/Long Term Care, Programs/CLEs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, May 30, 2016

Call for Abstracts-Association for Gerontology in Higher Education

The Association for Gerontology in Higher Education's (AGHE) annual conference is scheduled for March 9-12, 2016 in Miami, Florida. The call for abstracts for one of the six themes for the conference closes at noon on June 1, 2016. For more information, click here.

 

May 30, 2016 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Programs/CLEs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tasteful, Tacky or Trendy: A Proposed TV Show Involving Family Fights over Heirlooms?

It's Memorial Day. Perhaps you are sharing a picnic with family and friends. You might need a topic to spice up the conversation amid potato salad and barbecued hot dogs, right? How about this...

Recently I've been hearing from lawyers who are commenting on recent telephone calls or emails they've received from a West Coast TV promoter, inquiring as to whether they have clients who might be interested in appearing on a new television reality show.  Or, maybe the lawyer would want to participate? Here's a description of the proposed show from one of the lawyers who was contacted by a rep of the show:

"It will feature family members disputing who will inherit heirlooms, historical artifacts, or valuable collections. The show will provide a professional mediator free of charge to help the family members resolve the dispute."

I guess I shouldn't be surprised.  We've had some 20 seasons of  "Judge Judy" and her brethren.  I have a vague memory, going back to childhood, of an early iteration of  "Divorce Court" -- with lots of shouting.  While living in the U.K., I used to occasionally catch a show about searches for missing heirs and another about family confrontations with "hoarders." (And oh how sad that last one was.) So, I guess it isn't a huge jump to a show that arguably sensationalizes family fights over old family "stuff." Perhaps it is even a logical next step from Antiques Roadshow, the hugely popular, and fairly dignified, PBS program.

By coincidence, just as I had finished typing the above paragraphs, I received my own communication from a developer of the proposed show.  Turns out that the show is pitched as a "bigger" concept than just estate disputes.  Mark Dalbis, from Atlas Media Corporation, and who seems like a nice guy in his email, writes:

Continue reading

May 30, 2016 in Current Affairs, Estates and Trusts, State Cases | Permalink | Comments (1)

Friday, May 27, 2016

Filial Friday: Are Filial Responsibility Laws a Sign of the (Aging) Times?

Robert A. Mead, with many years of experience as a law librarian at the University of Kansas, the University of New Mexico and the New Mexico Supreme Court, and now serving as the Deputy Chief Public Defender for New Mexico, recently offered his take on claims made by family members and third-parties under state "filial responsibility" laws.  His article, "Getting Stuck with the Bill? Filial Responsibility Statutes, Long-Term Care, Medicaid, and Demographic Pressure," appears in the Elder Law Advisory published by Westlaw in May 2016 (and apparently available by subscription only).  He tracks the demographics of aging in the U.S. and surveys cases from Pennsylvania, North and South Dakota.  Based on research, Rob predicts:

The doubling of the number of elders in society will require a substantial increase in Medicare and Medicaid funding especially if a significant percentage of them are indigent in their last years. Without this increase, filial responsibility statutes and Medicaid estate recovery will likely be used by states to address shortfalls in Medicaid funding. . . .  Even without state authorities using filial responsibility statutes to seek Medicaid reimbursement, they will continue to be raised in related contexts. When siblings spar over the medical debts incurred by their deceased statutes and the effect of these debts on the probating of estates, filial responsibility becomes a complicating factor such as in Eori, Pittas, and Linderkamp cases. More insidiously, long-term care facilities are beginning to use filial support statutes to seek reimbursement for debts without waiting for resolution of whether the elder was eligible for Medicaid, as in Randall and Pittas. In some situations it will be financially advantageous for facilities to litigate against heirs rather than to settle for lower Medicaid rates. As the case law continues to develop and the demographic crisis grows, look for these novel uses of filial responsibility statutes to continue and become mainstream. It is incumbent upon lawyers representing clients in states with such statutes to plan and draft accordingly.

It is fun for me to see that Rob Mead, a former student from my own days at the University of New Mexico School of Law, has, entirely independent of my influence, kept his own eye on law and aging policy issues.

May 27, 2016 in Current Affairs, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Health Care/Long Term Care, Housing, State Cases, State Statutes/Regulations | Permalink | Comments (1)

Thursday, May 26, 2016

End of Life Prognosis: Is the Glass Half-Full or Half-Empty?

We all know folks who are the glass half-full type (optimist), as well as the glass half-empty type (pessimist).  When one talks to those folks, how those folks interpret what they hear depends on what "glass type" they are.   The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) ran a story about a study, Prevalence of and Factors Related to Discordance About Prognosis Between Physicians and Surrogate Decision Makers of Critically Ill Patients.  According to the abstract, "[m]isperceptions about prognosis by individuals making decisions for incapacitated critically ill patients (surrogates) are common and often attributed to poor comprehension of medical information."

The authors noted how important it is for the health care surrogate to have information in order to make a health care decision for the patient. But, according to the study,

Numerous studies over the last 3 decades indicate that surrogates of patients with advanced illness often have optimistic expectations about prognosis. This is problematic because optimistic expectations are associated with more use of invasive treatments in dying patients and delayed integration of palliative care. Clinicians cite unrealistic expectations by surrogates as one of the most important barriers to high-quality end-of-life care in seriously ill patients.(citations omitted).  

The authors look at some of the reasons for this disparity in viewpoint (including the lack of medical knowledge by surrogates). Here is one example of their findings regarding the disparity of views:

Physician-surrogate discordance about prognosis occurred in 122 of 229 instances (53%; 95% CI, 46.8%-59.7%). Among the 229 surrogates participating in the study, 98 (43%) were more optimistic than physicians and 24 (10%) were more pessimistic. Sixty-five instances (28%) were related to a combination of misunderstandings by surrogates and differences in belief between the physician and surrogate about the patient’s prognosis; 38 (17%) were related to misunderstanding only; 7 (3%) were related to different beliefs; and data were missing for 12.

The authors explore the reasons for the surrogates' glass half-full view and learned that the surrogates felt that a positive attitude:  "would improve the patient’s outcomes or protect themselves from emotional distress"; was justified because they knew the patient better than the doctor, including knowing if the patient were a strong person; and/or was based on their religious beliefs.

The study also explored the glass half-empty views of surrogates.  The study authors concluded that "[a]mong critically ill patients receiving care in ICUs, discordant expectations about prognosis were common betwTeen patients’ physicians and surrogate decision makers and were related to both misunderstandings by surrogates about physicians’ assessments of patients’ prognoses and differences in beliefs about patients’ prognoses."

The article is available here for free

May 26, 2016 in Advance Directives/End-of-Life, Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Health Care/Long Term Care | Permalink | Comments (0)

Older and Poorer? Local Governments Need to Plan

Governing ran an article last month, An Older, Poorer America Is Coming, The article opens

The percentage of older Americans living below the federal poverty line has decreased by two-thirds since 1966. That year, according to data from the Pew Research Center, 28.5 percent of Americans age 65 and over were poor. By 2012, that number had declined to just 9.1 percent.

But we may be at the end of that happy trendline. I think that over the next five to 10 years we will see a dramatic reversal in the economic fortunes of millions of our oldest residents. That has profound implications for governments at all levels.

Discussing how we fund retirement (the 3-legged stool), the author notes the changes in pension plans, the low amounts saved and the higher amount of debt. This is not particularly new to those of us who teach elder law. But consider the following from the author:

You can put off retirement, and many are. The labor force participation rate for those 65 and older increased from 12.4 percent in 1994 to 18.6 percent in 2014. But you can’t put off aging. The collapse of incomes for this group when they no can longer work is going be a double hit for government, decreasing the taxes they pay just as they need more public services.

The author calls on local governments to be planning for this scenario: "the consequences of dramatic increases in the older poor, including looking at affordable housing, transit and health care." Noting the potential power of the ballot box, the author concludes "Given the size of the baby boom population, a return to the poverty rates that existed among aging Americans before the War on Poverty would result in more than 8 million newly impoverished seniors. They’re not going to sit quietly on a street corner with a tin cup."

May 26, 2016 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Retirement | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, May 24, 2016

Sad Story-Lack of Money for Medications Ends in Spouse's Death

A very sad story hit the news last week.  A Florida man killed his chronically ill wife because they couldn't afford her prescriptions. Florida Man Says He Killed Sick Wife Because He Couldn’t Afford Her Medicine, Sheriff Says explains that the husband in the over 50 year marriage told the law enforcement officer who responded to the call that "[t]he cost of her medications had become so burdensome that they could no longer afford it ... [s]o on Monday morning while she was sleeping, he shot her in the head...." According to the article the husband has been charged with premeditated first degree murder.    A representative of the Sherriff's office was quoted as saying that the husband "was perfectly clear on that he was going to be arrested and go to jail, but again, he felt that this is where it had gotten to him and this was his course of action...  showed emotion and he was very clear that he was out of options in his mind.” At the time of the story, according to the article, there was no information about their health insurance status.

This story notes the issues with elders on fixed incomes and the costs of medications. There have been stories in the press of late about price spikes in certain medications and the Senate Committee on Aging has held two hearings this year on the topic, available here and here.

May 24, 2016 in Crimes, Current Affairs, Health Care/Long Term Care, Medicare | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, May 23, 2016

Association for Gerontology in Higher Ed Conference

The Association for Gerontology in Higher Ed annual meeting is set for March 9-12, 2017 in Miami.  The call for abstracts closes June 1, 2016 with the conference's theme  "The Future is Here: Educating a New Generation of Professionals in Aging Worldwide." A number of tracks will be offered, including on these topics:

Global Aging

Curriculum and Policy Issues

Age-Friendly Environments

Translating Research to Education and Training

Workforce Development

Program and Curriculum Development

Diversity and Social Justice for Older Persons

More information about submitting an abstract is available here.

May 23, 2016 in Current Affairs, Other, Programs/CLEs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, May 22, 2016

The PRACTICAL Supported Decision-making Tool from the ABA

Two ABA commissions and two ABA sections have created the PRACTICAL supported decision-making tool for lawyers which "aims to help lawyers identify and implement decision-making options for persons with disabilities that are less restrictive than guardianship." PRACTICAL is the acronym for the steps the lawyer takes to identify the options both during the interview with the client and after when considering the case. The tool is available both as a fillable pdf or a word document. There is also an accompanying resource guide in pdf

Download your copy now!

May 22, 2016 in Cognitive Impairment, Current Affairs, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Health Care/Long Term Care | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, May 20, 2016

Caregiving's Impact

I had mentioned previously that I was looking at the Genworth annual cost of care survey.  As a corollary, Genworth has information about who provides care, referred to as The Expanding Circle of Care.  The website mentions the caregivers, with "[t]he Beyond Dollars Research reveal[ing] 5 key insights on the true impact of long term care." The Expanding Circle of Care Beyond Dollars 2015 explains the 5 "key insights" in the executive summary. The circle of care is explained as:

The financial, physical and emotional demands of providing care for a loved one can sometimes be more than a single caregiver can handle. The good news is that more family members are helping provide care. The opportunity to plan for the likelihood of needing long term care before a crisis situation occurs remains large. Our research has shown that a "Circle of Care" often forms around the care recipient, involving people who provide different levels and types of support.

The second insight is that although caregivers are positive about their role of caregivers, they note that "[c]aregiving can negatively impact health & well-being", including familial relationships and interactions with friends. The third insight is instructive regarding the future: "Caregivers’ savings and retirement funds are at risk"

Caregivers who help provide financial assistance for the care of their loved ones estimate that they pay, on average, a total of about $10,000 in out-of-pocket expenses.

That’s up from an average of $7,285 in 2010. Those financial expenses can include everything from household expenses, personal items, or transportation services, to payment of informal caregivers or long term care facilities.

Most caregivers did not anticipate or plan for this expenditure. In many cases, they are cutting back on personal spending and savings. More significantly, some may be jeopardizing their own financial futures.

 

It follows logically then that the fourth insight  builds from the third one: "Caregivers’ careers and livelihoods are impacted by providing care."  The caregivers who work reported a definite impact on their jobs, which in turn impacts the caregiver's bottom line. "Absences, reduced hours and chronic tardiness can translate into a significant reduction in a caregiver’s paycheck."

The executive summary is available here.

 

 

 

 

May 20, 2016 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Health Care/Long Term Care, Statistics | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, May 19, 2016

Simulated Aging

While I was on the Genworth site looking at the looking at their annual Cost of Care survey findings, I noticed their simulated aging project, R70i Aging Experience. The Genworth R70i Aging Experience, according to the website "uses state-of-the-art technology to help people step into their future selves and directly experience the physical effects associated with aging. The experience reinforces the importance of thinking about future long term care needs and talking to loved ones about how they would like to age." The website offers interactive controls so the user can examine certain points of the "aging suit" as well as a video that shows how the suit functions along with a narration.  This would be really cool if we could have one for our students to use, so they can experience it firsthand. (If anyone from Genworth is reading this and wants to donate one to us, I promise we'll share with other educational institutions :-))

May 19, 2016 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Health Care/Long Term Care, Science | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, May 18, 2016

Aging. Can We Cure It?

We have blogged before about the idea of aging that is something to be "cured".  The recent article in the New York Times explained some cutting edge research about fighting aging. Dogs Test Drug Aimed at Humans’ Biggest Killer: Age explains about a clinical trial with dogs that has implications for humans "the trial also represents a new frontier in testing a proposition for improving human health: Rather than only seeking treatments for the individual maladies that come with age, we might do better to target the biology that underlies aging itself."  The drug being tested on dogs was previously tested on mice and "improved heart health and appeared to delay the onset of some diseases in older mice" but there is no guarantee that the same result will be achieved with dogs.

According to the article, age itself serves as a huge risk factor for a number of fatal diseases, so "[a] drug that slows aging, the logic goes, might instead serve to delay the onset of several major diseases at once." "Geroscience" that is "the study of aging’s basic biology" according to those quoted in the article, hasn't received a lot of attention. There's some genius in the approach of testing this drug with dogs, given American's love affair with their dog family members.

“Many of us in the biology of aging field feel like it is underfunded relative to the potential impact on human health this could have,” said Dr. Kaeberlein, who helped pay for the study with funds he received from the university for turning down a competing job offer. “If the average pet owner sees there’s a way to significantly delay aging in their pet, maybe it will begin to impact policy decisions.”

The article explains that research has been  more "disease-specific" rather than globally looking at slowing down aging. Although the article does mention some projects that are specifically looking at slowing down or reversing aging.  The article also explains the challenges for research in this field. What would be the results to humans if this research proves successful? A longer, healthier life. And if it isn't successful? Dr. Kaeberlein, explained: “I would argue we should be willing to tolerate some level of risk if the payoff is 20 to 30 percent increase in healthy longevity,” he said. “If we don’t do anything, we know what the outcome is going to be. You’re going to get sick, and you’re going to die.”

 

May 18, 2016 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Health Care/Long Term Care, Science | Permalink | Comments (0)