Thursday, May 28, 2015

Ohio Successfully Uses Local Property Tax Levies to Supplement Senior Services

In the PBS documentary airing in May and June, Caring for Mom & Dad, the second half of the program focuses on policy initiatives to support services for older adults. One interesting highlight is Ohio's use of local property tax levies that directly supplement senior services.  Begun in the early 1980s as a referendum initiative in just one county, similar programs have been adopted by voters in counties or municipalities in more than 70 of Ohio's 88 counties. That is an amazing history, especially given the usual hostilities about "new" taxes. Voters appear to recognize that the levies permit unique flexibility to design programs that meet the needs of their community's seniors, whether in rural or urban areas, such as transportation services or home care subsidies.  The revenue now generated in Ohio, more than $125  million per year, exceeds federal grant funding under the Older Americans Act nationally. 

Ohio's inspiring "Lady of the Levy," Lois Dale Brown, is mentioned in the PBS documentary, and she's profiled, along with additional details about the senior service levies, on the Ohio Department of Aging's website. 

As a reminder, WPSU-TV is airing Caring for Mom & Dad at 8 p.m. this evening in Pennsylvania, followed by a one hour "Conversations Live" open to incoming calls, texts and emails.  Details available here. 

May 28, 2015 in Current Affairs, Estates and Trusts, Ethical Issues, Federal Statutes/Regulations, Film, Health Care/Long Term Care, Housing, State Statutes/Regulations, Statistics | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Can You Get A Divorce if You Have Dementia? That's the $10M Question in South Florida

From our roving reporter (okay, actually from my great Dickinson Law colleague, Professor Laurel Terry) we get headline news in Palm Beach, Florida and a front-page question about whether an older man has the capacity necessary under that state's "unique" law to seek an end to his later-in-life second marriage.  You won't be surprised to read that money is involved in this lawsuit: 

Sitting in his oceanfront condominium in Palm Beach, [87-year old] Martin Zelman can’t immediately name the president of the United States, isn’t sure what year it is and admits he can’t remember the month or the date of Valentine's Day. But he knows he wants to divorce his wife [age 80], whom he married in 2000, 7 years after they began dating.

 

Or does he?  That's the $10 million dollar question that surrounds Zelman vs. Zelman, a unique and legally complex divorce case wending its way through Palm Beach County Circuit Court.

 

While the issues raised are intensely personal, they lay bare the ways adult children could use the court system to manipulate prenuptial agreements designed to protect spouses in second marriages. They also expose quirks in Florida's divorce laws, particularly a little known caveat that imposes a three-year waiting period in cases where one of the spouses has been declared mentally unfit.

For more, see Can Florida Man with Dementia File for Divorce? by Jane Musgrave for the Palm Beach Post. This story brings to mind regular reader Jennifer Young's recent, wry comment on a separate post, strongly recommending "shacking up" to avoid late-in-life second guessing of second marriages.  All kind of sad, isn't it?

May 28, 2015 in Cognitive Impairment, Current Affairs, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Estates and Trusts, Ethical Issues, State Cases, State Statutes/Regulations | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, May 25, 2015

The Affordable Care Act & Medicaid Expansion

A new report from the AARP Public Policy Institute/Urban Institute highlights the positive impact of Medicaid expansion for the 50-64 age group. Monitoring the Impact of Health Reform on Americans Ages 50–64 notes that "[t]he Uninsured Rate for 50- to 64-Year-Olds Dropped 31 Percent since December 2013."

The abstract for the report offers that

New data from the December 2014 Health Reform Monitoring Survey show that the share of Americans ages 50 to 64 without health insurance fell by nearly a third, from 11.6 percent to 8.0 percent, between December 2013 and December 2014. States that chose to expand eligibility for their Medicaid programs saw a larger drop in uninsured rates among 50- to 64-year-olds than states that did not. Overall, the number of 50- to 64-year olds with health coverage increased by approximately 2.2 million between December 2013 and December 2014.

The report determines that "Medicaid expansion was a clear driver of the reduction of the uninsured rate among 50- to 64-year olds."

The full report is available here.

May 25, 2015 in Current Affairs, Federal Statutes/Regulations, Health Care/Long Term Care, Medicaid | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, May 22, 2015

More on "Right to Try" Laws

Professor Rebecca Dresser has written a column on "right to try" laws.  "Right to Try" Laws: The Gap between Experts and Advocates was published in the May-June 2015 Hastings Center Report.  The abstract for the column provides

The year 2014 brought a new development in the bioethics “laboratory of the states.” Five states adopted “right to try” laws intended to promote terminally ill patients’ access to investigational drugs. Many more state legislatures are now considering such laws. The campaign for right to try laws is the latest move in an ongoing effort to give seriously ill patients access to drugs whose safety and effectiveness remain largely unknown. Although scientists and policy-makers oppose the right to try approach, it has proven quite popular among state legislators and the public.                
A subscription is required for the full article.

May 22, 2015 in Advance Directives/End-of-Life, Current Affairs, State Statutes/Regulations | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

Is There A Role for Mediation in Prevention of Financial Abuse of Older People?

In the May 2015 issue of Conflict Resolution Quarterly, four authors use quantitative and qualitative data collected in Australia to identify risk factors for the financial abuse of older people by a family member, analyze the potential usefulness of mediation as a strategy to prevent this form of elder abuse, and to identify knowledge and skills important to mediators facing potential financial abuse.

The authors note that mediation is in the early stages of consideration as a strategic tool for combating financial elder abuse, and thus much of their report focuses on "potential" risks or benefits of mediation, rather than instances of its use.  Nonetheless their study leads to interesting conclusions, including:

Potential advantages:

(1) enhancing the rights and wishes of older people,

(2) opening and facilitating communication between family members and older persons,

(3) enhancing accountability and responsibility of family members, and

(4) reducing family conflict.

The authors also identify potential concerns, including:

Continue reading

May 22, 2015 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Ethical Issues, International | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, May 21, 2015

$10+ Billion Dollar Deal: CVS Health to Buy Pharma Giant Omnicare

 Anyone who's noticed the upsurge in M&A activity in the senior care industries will want to take special notice of today's news, with the announcement that CVS Health will spend $10.4 billion to buy Omnicare, thus giving CVS an even stronger pipeline for prescription drug distribution to the elderly.  (In 2006, CVS acquired Caremark Rx Inc. for a reported $21 billion.)

The Los Angeles Times reports:

The deal announced Thursday will give one of the nation's biggest pharmacy benefits managers national reach in dispensing prescription drugs to assisted living and skilled nursing homes, long-term care facilities, hospitals and other health care providers. Omnicare's long-term care business operates in 47 states and the District of Columbia. With more people entering assisted-living residences as the U.S. population ages, CVS Health says there is a "substantial growth opportunity" for companies serving those patients.

 

Cincinnati's Omnicare also provides pharmacy consulting and runs another segment that provides specialty pharmacy services. Specialty drugs are complex medications that treat certain forms of cancer or hepatitis C, among other conditions. They often represent treatment breakthroughs but can cost considerably more than other prescriptions. Use of these drugs is climbing, and insurers and employers are looking for help containing that cost.

This deal should keep a lot of lawyers busy! From The American Lawyer, news of four major law firms involved in the latest CVS acquisition.

UPDATE:  Here's an interesting editorial observation from an industry observer, describing Omnicare as the giant "lion of the jungle" who is now being gobbled up by giant CVS as the T-Rex.  Amusing, but apt, metaphors and observations about the potential implications for the public.

May 21, 2015 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Health Care/Long Term Care, Medicare | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Documentary on "Moving with Grace"

St. Louis Elder Law Attorney Martha Brown recently recommended a 2013 documentary, writing:  "It is called 'Moving with Grace.'  It is played a lot in St. Louis on the local PBS station as reporter Stone Phillips and his parents lived in St. Louis.  It is a wonderful documentary about the trials and  tribulations of aging parents without the drama of a dysfunctional family."  That is an important message, right?  The challenges associated with "growing older" can hit everyone, even the "best" of families.

American Public Television, that distributes the program, previews it and offers a link to scheduling in your area here, explaining:

Like many baby boomers, former NBC anchor Stone Phillips and his siblings found  themselves caring for their aging parents. Ninety-two-year-old Vic, a World War  II veteran, copes with chronic heart issues, although his mind and memory  remain "as reliable as a Bob Gibson fastball." Grace, his wife of 66 years,  suffers from dementia, which robs the once-gregarious former teacher of her  short-term memory. MOVING WITH GRACE, an intimate documentary Phillips produced  and shot, follows this charming couple as they move out of the family home in  Missouri and adapt to life first in a retirement community and later in an  assisted-living facility. This honest and, at times, poignant story highlights  the common struggles associated with elder care and its consequences.

Thank you, Martha, for sharing this resource!

May 21, 2015 in Cognitive Impairment, Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Ethical Issues, Health Care/Long Term Care, Housing, Television | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, May 20, 2015

Before there was "Elder Law"? Jeff Marshall, Esq. remembers...

ElderLawGuy Jeff Marshall has always been a bit ahead of his time, including being among the first to recognize that aging can carry with it a distinct set of legal issues.  Not every lawyer is equipped to deal with families facing dramatic changes, whether in terms of temperament or legal knowledge.  Jeff constantly stays on top of new developments, in both law and technology.  For example, read here how Jeff uses "tweeting" as a tool, to help him stay current on the law, and engaged with the wider world.  Jeff has often inspired me, from the moment of my first "big" meeting with him here in Pennsylvania almost 20 years ago, at a little conference on a very cold winter day in Wilkes Barre. It is hard to believe, but he's been a specialist in elder and estate law for 35 years! Here's part of the tale, from the Sun-Gazette.com:

When attorney Jeff Marshall returned home in 1980 his vision, according to a news release, was to found a law firm that would serve the needs of older adults. A native of Lock Haven, Marshall had graduated from Stanford Law School in 1972 and had remained in California for the rest of that decade. By 1980 he was ready to return to his roots in Pennsylvania.

 

At the time, there was no such thing as an "elder law firm." But Marshall recognized that his older clients faced a complicated array of legal, financial, and health care issues, the news release said. Their legal planning needed to be coordinated with non-legal concerns to best protect their dignity, comfort and self-determination. So he set about putting together a team of professionals with backgrounds in law, nursing, social work, and care management who were able to meet his client's broad needs.

 

Thirty-five years later the seeds he planted have grown into one of the most respected elder law and estate planning law firms in Pennsylvania with four offices in Williamsport, Jersey Shore, Wilkes-Barre and Scranton....  The firm celebrated its 35th anniversary at its 19th Annual Professional Updates held on May 6 in Williamsport and May 7 in Scranton.

Congratulations -- and thank you -- Jeff!

May 20, 2015 in Current Affairs, Estates and Trusts, Legal Practice/Practice Management | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, May 19, 2015

Blueprint for Advocacy? Changing the Culture of Care

Recently I had the opportunity to read a report of Northern Ireland's independent Commissioner of Older People advocating for "a change of culture" to better protect older people in care settings. The thirteen primary proposals strike me as concise, reasonable, and extraordinarily important, for any (make that every) country, including the U.S..  See what you think:

1. The rights, quality of life, dignity and care needs of vulnerable older people should be at the heart of planning, delivering, regulating and inspecting care services; it is their needs that must matter the most.

2. Standards for the care of vulnerable older people should be clearly displayed and available to all service users and their families and relatives of all nursing, residential and domiciliary care services as well as for any prospective users.

3. Inspection processes should be rigorous, with decisive and timely enforcement action taken when failings are detected.

4. The regulation and inspection service should include a rating system for care homes and domiciliary services. In addition to an overall rating, it should clearly identify if there are any breaches of regulations or failures to comply with improvements required.

5. There should be clear and rigorously applied sanctions taken against care providers for non-compliance with the minimum standards.

Continue reading

May 19, 2015 in Current Affairs, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Ethical Issues, Health Care/Long Term Care, Housing, International | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, May 18, 2015

Drops in Occupancy Mark Challenges to Financial Health for Senior Living Industries

Publically-traded Brookdale Senior Living, founded in 1978, has grown to become the largest owner and operator of "senior living" communities in the U.S., including for-profit continuing care retirement communities (CCRCs). Thus, it is good to keep an eye on the finances of Brookdale for those of us interested in the long-term financial health of CCRCs and other senior housing options.

Steve Monroe at Irving Levin Associates notes that Brookdale "was no different than the rest of the market, posting sharp drops in first quarter occupancy" for 2015:

"The legacy Emeritus [a component of Brookdale, following a 2014 merger] properties posted a 110 basis point decline from the fourth quarter of 2014, and a whopping 200 basis point decline from a year ago. The legacy Brookdale properties dropped 80 basis points sequentially and 110 basis points from a year ago. This was not good news, but not unexpected. Oddly enough, the legacy Brookdale properties had a 250 basis point increase in community operating margin to 35.2% despite the occupancy declines. The Emeritus properties had a 90 basis point sequential drop in margin, which makes more sense."

How do you achieve a significant increase in "operating margin" despite "occupancy declines?" A good question to ponder.  Steve Monroe continues: "The reasons for the legacy Brookdale improvement were a combination of cost controls and more pricing flexibility. Move-ins have been increasing, which is great, but 'cost controls' always make me nervous, especially with the current acuity creep. Stay tuned."

The reference to "acuity creep" is to the increase in average age and frailty of new residents, compared with past years (especially before the financial crisis of 2008-10). This trend impacts CCRCs in several ways, both in terms of market appeal to healthier potential residents, and operating costs tied to an earlier need for higher levels of care.  An additional question may be whether low interest rates have supported a bubble in certain segments of senior housing despite the softer occupancy rates, and whether an eventual return to higher capitalization rates will result in lower values and additional consequences.

Along that same line, the Philadelphia Inquirer published a recent article in their "retirement" news edition, noting "Continuing-Care Retirement Community Choice Requires Diligence," by Harold Brubaker, with tips on what to ask if you are a consumer considering a CCRC option.

May 18, 2015 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Health Care/Long Term Care, Housing, Property Management, Retirement, Statistics | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

UK Conference on Intersections of Aging, Gender & Sexualities

The University of Surrey in the UK is hosting an international conference on July 6-7 on "Intersections of Ageing, Gender and Sexualities," with speakers from Israel, Iran, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Spain, Italy, Australia, South Africa, New Zealand, the U.S., and, of course, the U.K. 

Sociology Professor Toni Calasanti from Virginia Tech is giving the opening keynote address.  The half day sessions are separated into "themes," including Embodiment, Temporal (Dis)location, Queer Kinship, Representations, Intersections, and Age, Gender, Sexuality and Care.  Several of the sessions explore relationships between sexuality and menopause. 

For more on the program, see here.    

May 18, 2015 in Current Affairs, Discrimination, Ethical Issues, Health Care/Long Term Care, International, Programs/CLEs | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, May 15, 2015

Justice Dep't & CCRC Agree to Consent Order in Disabilities Discrimination Claim

On May 12, the U.S. Department of Justice announced resolution of a disabilities discrimination complaint initiated by residents of a Continuing Care Retirement Community (CCRC) in Virginia. 

The resolution includes filing of a complaint and consent order that resolves allegations that Fort Norfolk Retirement Community Inc. (Fort Norfolk) violated the Fair Housing Act by instituting policies that discriminated against residents with disabilities at Harbor’s Edge, a CCRC in Norfolk, Virginia:

The consent order, which still needs to be approved by the court . . . along with a complaint, in the U.S. District Court of the Eastern District of Virginia.  The complaint alleges that beginning in May 2011, Fort Norfolk instituted a series of policies that prohibited, and then limited, residents in the assisted living, nursing and memory support units at Harbor’s Edge from dining in dining rooms or attending community events with independent living residents.  The complaint also alleges that when residents and family members complained about these policies, Fort Norfolk retaliated against them.  In addition, the complaint alleges that Fort Norfolk had polices that discriminated against residents who used motorized wheelchairs by requiring those residents to pay a non-refundable fee, obtain liability insurance and obtain Fort Norfolk’s permission.

 

Under the consent order, Fort Norfolk will pay $350,000 into a settlement fund to compensate residents and family members who were harmed by these policies.  Fort Norfolk will also pay a $40,000 civil penalty to the United States.  In addition, Fort Norfolk will appoint a Fair Housing Act compliance officer and will implement a new dining and events policy, a new reasonable accommodation policy and a new motorized wheelchair policy.

There is a history of similar issues arising in other CCRCs.  For example, in 2008, in California, CCRC resident Lillian Hyatt initiated, and eventually resolved to her satisfaction, a discrimination claim based on a ban on "walkers" in the dining rooms of her community.  

As the average age of residents in CCRCs has increased in recent years, the "appearance" issues are sometimes raised as a marketing or image concern, contrasting sharply with the expectations of individual residents as they age and seek continued access to the full range of services in their community. 

Our thanks to Karen Miller, Esq., of Florida, for bringing the recent Virginia case to our attention.

May 15, 2015 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Discrimination, Ethical Issues, Federal Cases, Health Care/Long Term Care, Housing | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, May 14, 2015

During Month of May on PBS: "Caring for Mom & Dad"

Caring for Mom & DadPBS is premiering a powerful documentary special, Caring for Mom & Dad, during the month of May, with Meryl Streep as the narrator.  A sample? Many of us might find resonance with one adult's "bad daughter" (or "bad son") feelings of guilt, candidly admitted here. 

Even more important than the video itself will be the conversations that follow viewing. Check your local public t.v. schedule to see when the program will air in your area.  (You can check here, to see if the documentary is scheduled yet in your viewing area -- go to the drop down menu for "Schedule.") Plus, in some markets, the documentary will be combined with a live call-in opportunity for individuals and families to explore health care, social care, financial topics and legal issues with a panel of experts.

My own university, Penn State, is hosting the special on Thursday, May 28, 2015  at 8:00 p.m. (Eastern time), followed by Conversations Live at 9:00 p.m. That is two weeks from today on WPSU-TV, a station that reaches a viewing area of 29 counties in central Pennsylvania. In addition, the Conversations Live program will be broadcast on WPSU-FM radio and can be viewed "on-line" at WPSU.org

As a result of an invitation to be part of the WPSU studio panel, I've had the opportunity to watch the documentary -- several times (it's that interesting!) -- in preparation to help in responding to audience comments, emails and call-in questions.  Additional Conversations Live guests include:

    Ai-jen Poo, co-director of Caring Across Generations and director of National Domestic Workers Alliance, will be joining via satellite from D.C.  Ai-jen Poo is featured in the documentary, and she also has a particular interest in enactment of a Domestic Workers' Bill of Rights, to deal realistically and fairly with the work force that will be necessary to meet the boomer generation's care needs.

    Dr. Gwen McGhan, Hartford Center for Geriatric Nursing Excellence at Penn State, with a research background on informal family caregiving.

    Jane McDowell, Hartford Center for Geriatric Nursing Excellence at Penn State, and a geriatric nurse practitioner.

The documentary was produced by WGBH-Boston, with funding assistance from AARP and Pfizer.

Please join us and share your stories and observations. The documentary starts with personal stories, but the public policy messages that emerge are ones that need to be heard at state and federal levels -- and heard clearly -- for there to be hope for realistic, necessary and timely solutions.

May 14, 2015 in Cognitive Impairment, Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Ethical Issues, Federal Statutes/Regulations, Film, Health Care/Long Term Care, Medicaid, Medicare, Social Security, State Statutes/Regulations | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, May 13, 2015

Pro Bono Attorneys Needed to Serve as Social Security Rep Payees

The recent issue of Bifocal, the bi-monthly Journal of the ABA Commission on Law and Aging has a great line-up of articles, including a piece by Social Security Administration (SSA) specialist Janet Truhe on Social Security Seeks Pro Bono Lawyers to Meet Need for Representative Payees.  She notes that many disabled individuals do not have family members or other trusted persons who can serve as their agents for receipt and management of Social Security benefits.  Anticipating the need for "rep payees" will continue to grow as boomers age, SSA is recruiting attorneys to serve: 

Recently, the agency announced the implementation of a pro bono pilot in the State of Maryland (where SSA is headquartered), which is aimed at expanding the pool of suitable representative payee candidates statewide. SSA believes that partnership with the legal community for this purpose is a natural fit....

 

One particular advantage of this pro bono opportunity is that any attorney, regardless of his or her specialty, can serve as a representative payee with SSA providing any needed assistance. SSA has created a web site for attorney volunteers with training and other information about the role of a representative payee. Any licensed attorney in Maryland, or in neighboring jurisdictions, who would like to volunteer as a representative payee for a beneficiary residing in Maryland can go to http://www.socialsecurity.gov/payee/probonopilot.htm and complete an online registration form. SSA will send the volunteer attorney’s contact information to the servicing local field office. When SSA needs a representative payee for a particular beneficiary, that field office will contact one of the volunteer attorneys and make an appointment for the attorney to come in for an interview and meet the beneficiary.

Hat tip to ElderLawGuy Jeff Marshall for pointing out this SSA recruitment effort.

May 13, 2015 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Federal Statutes/Regulations, Programs/CLEs, Social Security | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

A Woman Without Fear...

On Mothers' Day, NPR replayed a great StoryCorps interview with 87-year old Kay Wang, from her growing up days in China to her fearlessness in facing down a thief in Bloomingdales.

 

My thanks to my Dickinson Law colleague Professor Laurel Terry for making sure we would catch this interesting piece.

May 13, 2015 in Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Are Seniors' Children Appropriate Sources of Reverse Mortgages?

One option for seniors needing more income late in life is using the equity in their homes, and "reverse mortgages" may make it possible for the older homeowner to stay in the home longer.  The Washington Post recently explored the option of having family members serve as the source of reverse mortgage funding.  When the Kids Provide a Reverse Mortgage for Mom and Dad outlines potential pros and cons of family-based financing, starting with the mechanics of the loan:

Here’s a simplified example: Say you and two siblings want to help Mom and Dad, who are in their late 70s. You and your siblings are all doing well enough that you have at least some cash to spare. Ultimately, you want to retain your parents’ house for the estate once your parents pass away, keep costs to a minimum and sell the property only when you, not a faraway bank, choose to do so.

 

So you sit down with Mom and Dad and determine that, at least for the foreseeable future, they will need about $1,500 in additional income a month. You and your siblings agree to apportion the payments among yourselves in some way, maybe a commitment of $500 a month each for a period of years. You also pick an interest rate that achieves a win-win result for you and your parents — say, 3 percent annually. That’s much lower than a commercial lender would charge but higher than what you’ve been earning on your bank deposits or money market funds. There are no required fees upfront — hey, it’s Mom and Dad.

Thanks to Maryland elder law attorney Morris Klein for the pointer to this article. 

May 13, 2015 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Federal Statutes/Regulations, Housing, Property Management, Retirement | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, May 12, 2015

Pharma Company Fights Back on Off-Label Drug Use Prosecutions

We've written on this blog several times about successful prosecutions connected to so-called "off label" drug use, including the use of antipsychotics for agitation in dementia patients.  See here and here, for example.  Now, courtesy of a New York Times article, there is news of a pharmaceutical company's lawsuit to preempt such prosecutions, raising First Amendment free speech rights as grounds for off-label advocacy: 

On Thursday, Amarin Pharma took the unusual step of suing the Food and Drug Administration,  arguing that it has a constitutional right to share certain information about its product with doctors, even though the agency did not permit the company to do so. Lawyers for the company said that they believed their case was the first time a manufacturer had pre-emptively sued the agency over the free-speech issue, before it had been accused of any wrongdoing. Other companies have sued the agency only after they have gotten into trouble....

 

Lawyers for Amarin say the company is not proposing to market Vascepa to a wider population of patients, merely to share with doctors the results of a 2011 company-sponsored clinical trial that showed the drug lowered triglycerides in patients with “persistently high” levels....

More details about the suit available here

May 12, 2015 in Consumer Information, Crimes, Current Affairs, Ethical Issues, Federal Cases, Federal Statutes/Regulations, Health Care/Long Term Care | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Signs of the Times (Part 2 from Belfast)

Earlier this week, I posted about surprising "products" you can find at Belfast,Northern Ireland's St. George's Market. 

There are other spots in Belfast that also bring a smile.  Near the law courts are two shops that offer tailoring and "Legal Clothing,"  one, appropriately enough, run by the Suitor family, and the other with the nice chosen name, Law Suit

In Avoca, an Irish-family run business with stores in several spots, both in north and south Ireland, I ran across another "sign of the (aging) times."  Walking past the card collection in the shop in Belfast, I noticed an array of birthday cards, running from age 2 to ... 80, 90, and yes, 100! The proportion of the population in Northern Ireland over age 65 is approaching the 20% mark.

Northern Ireland Cards ... from 2 to.... 80, 90, 100

May 12, 2015 in Current Affairs, International | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, May 11, 2015

Signs of the Times? (Part 1 from Belfast)

St, Geirge's Market Free Range EggsLast week I was visiting in Ireland, and specifically in Belfast, Northern Ireland, where I was giving a workshop on comparative contract law for students at Queen's University Belfast in its new J.D program When I visit the city, I always try to save a day for a "dander" around the town, which is wonderfully walkable. 

St. George's Market is a favorite spot -- and in fact last year while I was visiting, Queen Elizabeth was there too, a definite surprise, if you know the history of politics in this city.

There is an interesting collection of stalls, that change a bit with the season and the day.   

 

 

Transactions always come with a smile. You can buy fresh fish (I swear I saw one wink at me), fresh eggs, or your funeral plan!  St. George's Market Your Funeral Plan

  St. George's Market Transaction 2015  

 

  

 

 

 

  

 


 

May 11, 2015 in Advance Directives/End-of-Life, Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Estates and Trusts, International | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, May 5, 2015

Savings Crisis?

Yesterday I posted about a new report on Americans' views of the "retirement crisis".  Another report from the same organization, National Institute for Retirement Security ,focuses on Americans saving for retirement.  The Continuing Retirement Savings Crisis is a 30 page report that offers 4 key findings:

    1. Account ownership rates are closely correlated with income and wealth…
    2. The average working household has virtually no retirement savings. When all households are included— not just households with retirement accounts—the median retirement account balance is $2,500 for all working-age households and $14,500 for near-retirement households…
    3. Even after counting households’ entire net worth—a generous measure of retirement savings—two thirds (66 percent) of working families fall short of conservative retirement savings targets for their age and income based on working until age 67...
    4. Public policy can play a critical role in putting all Americans on a path toward a secure retirement by strengthening Social Security, expanding access to low cost, high quality retirement plans, and helping low income workers and families save…

The report is available for download here. There is a webinar available (running time slightly over 45 minutes) here. A PowerPoint that accompanies the webinar is also available here.

May 5, 2015 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Retirement | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)