Friday, May 16, 2014

An "Education Connection" for Senior Living

As readers may have noticed, I've been a long-time "student" of Continuing Care Retirement Communities (CCRCs), drawn to the industry because of its vibrancy and dynamic approach to senior living.  Along the way, I've come to know the many strengths -- and occasional weaknesses -- of individual operations, and the importance of resident engagement to long-range success.  One of my resident contacts shared with me a new PBS NewsHour spotlight on university-connected CCRCs, with a prime focus on Oak Hammock, a community developed under the auspices of the University of Florida.  Universities can offer a unique draw for alums and other college grads, including retired faculty, who value continued educational opportunities.

Here's the link to "Why More Seniors Are Going Back to College -- to Retire."

Although short (about 8 minutes), I find the piece to be balanced, especially in that it hints at the financing terms often needed to make such communities attractive and therefore viable. Some of the people interviewed explain the need for sophisticated mangement to counsel university-based programs, as development of CCRCs can be quite different than simply building a senior's version of  "dorms." My own university stumbled a bit at the starting gate in its early efforts to get a community fully occupied, with the 2008 recession added to the challenges.

Thanks, Karen, for sending us the link!    

May 16, 2014 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Health Care/Long Term Care, Housing | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, May 9, 2014

ABA Bifocal Topics: Health Care Advance Directives, Guardianships and More

The April 2014 issue of the American Bar Association's Bifocal publication is now available.  Current articles include:

By the way, while most Bifocal articles are written by practicing attorneys, American Univesity Washington College of Law student, Karna Sandler, is the author of the article on how state laws may affect a guardian's health care authority.  Karna's an intern at the Commission on Law and Aging.  Way to go, Karna!

 In addtion, the issue provides details about AARP Foundation Scholarships to assist individuals in attending the 2014 National Aging and Law Conference to be held in Washington D.C. on October 16-17.  Deadline for the scholarship applications is June 15, 2014. 

May 9, 2014 in Advance Directives/End-of-Life, Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Federal Statutes/Regulations | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, May 7, 2014

Planning Ahead: Extend Malpractice Insurance for Retiring Lawyers?

In part 6 of the ABA Journal's series on retirement issues, retiring lawyers are reminded that one important option is to purchase "extended reporting endorsements" (ERE) or "tail coverage" for existing professional liability insurance policies.  Such an endorsement permits a longer period to report  claims for coverage.  Mark Bassingthwaighte, an attorney and risk manager for Attorneys Liability Protection Society (ALPS) explains, "Tail coverage ... [is] not a new policy."  Rather, the existing policy explains the terms of any ERE coverage option, with the cost set as a fixed percentage of the expiring policy's premium. 

"'I recommend that the retiring partner talk with other partners and request to be kept in the loop within the applicable state statute of limitations for malpractice should the firm dissolve; even formalize an agreement that works best to protect all parties involved,' says Matt Lubaroff, ALPS director of client services. 'The firm's ERE can only be purchased at the time of dissolution, and for certain firms the best answer would be upon the first retirement.'"

Additional planning topics for retiring lawyers appear in "Retirement Reset" by Susan Berson in the May issue of the ABA Journal.

May 7, 2014 in Consumer Information, Legal Practice/Practice Management, Retirement | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, May 6, 2014

Honor Older Veterans by Helping Them Access Services

Last Sunday, the Philadelphia Inquirer carried an Op-Ed by Patrick Murphy, an Iraq war veteran, and Karen Buck, executive director for SeniorLAW Center in Philadelphia.  Their words provide a welcome reminder, contrasting with the news I reported earlier today about allegations of inadequate care for veterans in Arizona.  In part they write:

"Experts estimate that 14 percent of the adult homeless population has served in the U.S. military. After valiant service, beterans deserve the most basic of human needs:  safe shelter, protection from abuse, enought to eat. 

 

What can we do to change this story for older veterans? 

 

First, know who the veterans are in  your daily life and thank them for their service.  Peace at home is a gift made possible by the harsh sacrifice of others; it's easy to take for granted.  Join  us in doing more by showing gratitude through action.

 

...Help connect an older veteran with the services he needs -- and encourage him to access them.  Many older veterans don't know what resources are available or they associate asking for help with weakness.  Yet, from the VA, they may be eligible for income supports, home-based or nursing home care, health care, burial assistance, education, and other benefits.  Nonprofits can help provide free legal assistance to address issues that arise over housing, family, health care, consumer issues, elder abuse, and financial exploitation.  Legal services rank among the top unmet needs of veterans, but we can all become advocates to help vets get the support they need and deserve."

As Patrick and Karen demonstrate, support for local legal service organizations in your area can be effective in helping veterans access key benefits, while also providing another important watchdog to help reduce or prevent the likelihood of fullblown VA scandals.

Experts estimate that 14 percent of the adult homeless population has served in the U.S. military. After valiant service, veterans deserve the most basic of human needs: safe shelter, protection from abuse, enough to eat.

What can we do to change this story for older veterans?

First, know who the veterans are in your daily life and thank them for their service. Peace at home is a gift made possible by the harsh sacrifice of others; it's easy to take for granted. Join us in doing more by showing gratitude through action.

Volunteering is one form of action. Help connect an older veteran with the services he needs - and encourage him to access them. Many older veterans don't know what resources are available or they associate asking for help with weakness. Yet, from the VA, they may be eligible for income supports, home-based or nursing home care, health care, burial assistance, education, and other benefits. Nonprofits can help provide free legal assistance to address issues that arise over housing, family, health care, consumer issues, elder abuse, and financial exploitation. Legal services rank among the top unmet needs of veterans, but we can all become advocates to help vets get the support they need and deserve.

Read more at http://www.philly.com/philly/opinion/20140504_Don_t_forget_key_work_of_U_S__vets.html#qwbXm13qk5jXlIby.99

Experts estimate that 14 percent of the adult homeless population has served in the U.S. military. After valiant service, veterans deserve the most basic of human needs: safe shelter, protection from abuse, enough to eat.

What can we do to change this story for older veterans?

First, know who the veterans are in your daily life and thank them for their service. Peace at home is a gift made possible by the harsh sacrifice of others; it's easy to take for granted. Join us in doing more by showing gratitude through action.

Volunteering is one form of action. Help connect an older veteran with the services he needs - and encourage him to access them. Many older veterans don't know what resources are available or they associate asking for help with weakness. Yet, from the VA, they may be eligible for income supports, home-based or nursing home care, health care, burial assistance, education, and other benefits. Nonprofits can help provide free legal assistance to address issues that arise over housing, family, health care, consumer issues, elder abuse, and financial exploitation. Legal services rank among the top unmet needs of veterans, but we can all become advocates to help vets get the support they need and deserve.

Read more at http://www.philly.com/philly/opinion/20140504_Don_t_forget_key_work_of_U_S__vets.html#qwbXm13qk5jXlIby.99

May 6, 2014 in Consumer Information, Health Care/Long Term Care, Retirement | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, May 2, 2014

Impact of Change in Assisted Living: Social Science Research

"The Facade of Stability in Assisted Living," an article by social scientists at University of Maryland Baltimore County, published in the May issue of the Journal of Gerontology (Series B: Social Sciences), takes a hard look at assisted living settings, using research from 17 different facilities.  Key findings include:

"Our ethnographic research in 17 diverse AL settings (2004-to the present) has found evidence that what may appear to be quite stable is, in fact, a facade.  First, our research indicates that stability -- in many senses -- is not the norm for ALs. . . . Changes occur at multiple levels of person (residents, family members, staff, or managers) collectives (groups or types of residents, staff or managers), organizations (owners or corporations) and external environments (economies or competitors). . . . Second, among these multiple levels and dimensions of change/instability, only a few have been examined substantially in research to date. . . . The changes in AL communities contradict their outward appearance or facade of stability and may profoundly affect the quality of life for residents."

The research, which the authors recognize has limitations because, for example, it was based on evaluation of AL facilities in a single state (Maryland), nonetheless is a reminder that families seeking reliable information about placements for aging loved ones should use caution about "old" data about any specific facility or provider "branding."  The authors caution, "changes driven by new owners or managers and altered competitive pressures challenge contemporary ALs to provide services beyond the original intention of this sector under the social model of care that dominated its origins." 

May 2, 2014 in Consumer Information, Health Care/Long Term Care, Housing | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Sunday, April 27, 2014

Press #1 for Frustration: Automation, Hospitality and Aging

During the years when I supervised Penn State Dickinson's Elder Protection Clinic, I was often struck by how much time our law students spent tracking down basic information on behalf of clients, such as credit card or mortgage histories, Social Security records, or insurance coverage details. The information was, in theory, equally available to the clients themselves, but often our clients, who tended to be on the older side of "aging," simply didn't have the energy, patience or skills needed to navigate the dense, automated systems typically associated with modern record-keeping and billing.  One of our student-lawyers made the apt observation that if you weren't "old" before you called some of the customer service "help" lines, you would be by the time you got an answer.

I was reminded of this recently while attempting to make a hotel reservation by telephone.  In my first attempt, I didn't have enough time to wait, so after 10 minutes of less-than-interesting music, I gave up. The second time, a day later, I was routed through a series of automated messages, apparently intended to entice me into becoming an "honors" guest of the hotel's larger chain.  I was using a cell phone, so each time the automated voice indicated a series of choices available, I had to take the phone away from my ear and look for the button in question.  I listened to four sets of automated instructions, even though each time my goal was the same, pressing whatever button I was told to press "if" I wanted to book a reservation.  Gee, are there that many other reasons why someone calls a hotel reservation number?  It took several minutes before I reached a live person, who with a very bored tone insisted I give several items of personal information before I was allowed to ask whether there was a room available for my specific date. You could tell she was reading from a script. By this point I had become distinctly grumpy about the lack of hospitality in this so-called hospitality venue.

As you have probably already guessed, there was "no room at the inn" for that date.  I asked to speak to a supervisor, not so much because I thought I could change the outcome, but because I wanted to register my feeble complaint about frustration with their system. That took another 10 minutes with more "music." But I was determined not to give up.

Amusingly, once I finally reached a "supervisor," the individual immediately agreed with my comments about the weakness of their automated system. That did a lot to dispel my annoyance.  And then -- shock -- she actually offered to solve the problem by calling the local hotel (which as it turns out I was not speaking with).  She found me an available room to book for the night in question. The encounter with the real human wasn't particularly fast, but I was content to wait, knowing a caring individual was trying to help.

This micro-experience, a minor annoyance, nonetheless gave me reason to think about two things:  (1) how much more difficult automation could be for someone who has a hearing problem, slowed reflexes, impaired vision, or diminished cognitive abilities, and (2) how often I'm positively impressed during my communications with well-run long-term care facilities.

When I telephone my father's assisted living community, for example, a live person answers the phone and often recognizes my name and my father's name. My whole family notices how well the staff members know their residents and remember helpful details about the residents' families. It isn't a fancy place, but the staff outshines most high-end resorts with their professionalism and good-natured hospitality.  And it is contagious, as I often see my father smiling in response to the staff members' kind words.

Also, when I visit CCRCs across the country for work-related reasons, I'm impressed by the very personal relationships I witness between residents and front-office management.  Admittedly, CCRCs are often at the upper end of the long-term care "pay" spectrum, but my impression over the years that I've been visiting such multi-level care facilities, including their skilled care units, is that management and staff at the most successful operations place a high value on human contact with residents and the public.  The best ones seem to embrace the notion that a hospitable, caring demeanor during direct interactions goes a long way to lowering the potential for confusion or angry disputes and thus increases the likelihood that someone will be a "client" and recommend new clients. 

So, is it possible that the long-term care industry, often portrayed negatively in the media, has something important to teach other segments of  industry about why automation is not the best, nor even the most cost effective, solution to customer relations, and why the personal touch still makes a difference?  

April 27, 2014 in Consumer Information, Health Care/Long Term Care | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, April 24, 2014

"What If It's Not Alzheimer's?"

My Penn State colleague from Hershey Medical Center, Dr. Claire Flaherty, has shared with me a another fascinating resource, "What If It's Not Alzheimer's?: A Caregiver's Guide to Dementia," by Gary Radin and Lisa Radin. 

The first chapter provides "The ABCs of Neurodegenerative Dementias," including frontotemporal dementia (FTD), Lewy Body Dementia, vascular dementia, as well as Alzheimer's Disease.  Key chapters including "finding the A Team" of specialists, and a guide to therapeutic interventions. 

The book reminds us that with some forms of dementia, particularly early onset dementias such as FTD, changes in personality or executive function may be the first signs, and easily misunderstood.  For example, the individual may manifest:

  • hypersexuality, including promiscuous sexual encounters with strangers; or
  • apathy or indifference to grooming and hygiene; or  
  • "hyperorality" with disinhibited consumption of large amounts of food; or
  • poor judgment with a lack of sense of consequences, sometimes coupled with poor impulse control

One chapter is unique, emphasizing the potential importance, after death, of an autopsy of the brain, and thus providing families with a way to contribute to biomedical research and the hope for better answers in the future.

April 24, 2014 in Books, Cognitive Impairment, Consumer Information, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Health Care/Long Term Care | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Sunday, April 13, 2014

Critical Issues to Consider in Planning Via Powers of Attorney

ElderLawGuy Jeff Marshall succinctly discusses four critical issues that individuals and families should consider when using Powers of Attorney in estate and incapacity planning. Here's the link to Jeff's "Powers of Attorney: Things You Need to Know."  

April 13, 2014 in Advance Directives/End-of-Life, Consumer Information, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Estates and Trusts, Property Management | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, April 9, 2014

Genworth Releases 2014 Survey on Costs of Care

For the 11th consecutive year, Genworth has released its national survey results for long-term care costs, including statistics for nursing home care, assisted living facility care, adult day health care, home health aide services, and homemaker services.  The survey draws upon information from more than 14,800 providers in 440 regions nationwide.

Genworth's 2014 information is offered in several formats, including:

In addition, and not surprising given that Genworth is an insurance company, the website offers planning guidelines, explaining the role for long-term care insurance. 

April 9, 2014 in Consumer Information, Health Care/Long Term Care, Statistics | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, April 3, 2014

Hot Topic: "How to Get Older Drivers Off the Road"

Digging out December 2010"How to get older drivers off the road." 

That's a frequent paper topic proposal for students in my Elder Law course, and one that usually triggers a conversation about the potential for "ageism." I remind students it will be important to provide evidence in support of their proposals, and not simply recount anecdotes about bad older drivers.  

But, in truth, there is plenty of data to identify risks associated with older driving, as suggested by Elder Law Attorney Robert Fleming on his great Blog, citing statistics from the Center for Disease Control about risks for "fatal" accidents over age 75.  See "Driving, Aging and Dealing with Family Dynamics."

ElderLawGuy Jeff Marshall takes a very personal look at his own driving future on his Blog, and uses that moment of self reflection to also examine strategies for encouraging older drivers to give up the keys.   Read "What to Do When Dad Shouldn't Be Driving."   

This is another area of "social policy" where the laws are not uniform on how to intervene when the older driver refuses to stop driving or to make other appropriate adjustments in when and where to drive.  Here is a link from the insurance industry's Claims Journal to a recent "State by State Look at Driving Rules for Older Drivers." 

And, for a somewhat more theoretical approach to the topic, from University of Miami Law Professor Bruce Winick, the always thoughtful guru of the therapeutic jurisprudence movement, see "Aging, Driving and Public Health: A Therapeutic Jurisprudence Approach."  Professor Winick proposes creation of community-based "safe driving centers," as a means of encouraging impaired drivers "voluntarily to cease or restrict their driving by offering inducements and alternative transportation solutions."

And of course, we have Professor Becky Morgan's preferred solution, the Jetsons' car that drives (and parks) itself.  Read "New Study on Autonomous Cars."  

April 3, 2014 in Consumer Information, Ethical Issues, State Cases, State Statutes/Regulations, Statistics | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, April 2, 2014

Professor Jonathan Barry Foreman: Responding to "Longevity Risk"

Prof. Jonathan Barry ForemanUniversity of Oklahoma Professor of Law Jonathan Barry Foreman writes on "Supporting the Oldest Old: The Role of Social Insurance, Pensions, and Financial Products," for the Elder Law Journal in 2014. 

He points to "longevity risk," defined as the risk of outliving one's retirement savings, as "probably the greatest risk facing current and future retirees" in the U.S.   As  several recent studies demonstrate, such as those cited on the Elder Law Prof Blog  here, here and here, many people are not adequately prepared in terms of finances for retirement. 

In responding to this risk, Professor Foreman writes thoughtfully, proposing  systemic alternatives, including expansion of Social Security and SSI for "the oldest old."  Professor Foreman suggests 90 years of age as the starting point for that category.  In addition he proposes greater incentives for public and private employers to promote annuities and other "lifetime income products" as components of employment-based retirement packages. 

He concludes with a warning based on our national history of frequently failing to make significant changes in advance of a predictable crisis:

"Social insurance programs like Social Security, Supplemental Security Income, and Medicaid will certainly need to be expanded. Workers will also need to be encouraged to work longer and save more for their eventual retirements, and both workers and retirees should be encouraged to annuitize more of their retirement savings.

 

While these kinds of solutions seem fairly predictable, the answers to two important policy questions have yet to be decided. First, how much will the government require the oldest old to save earlier in their lives? And second, how much will the government redistribute to benefit the oldest old? Unfortunately, if the history of the Social Security system is any indication, both government mandates and redistribution will be modest, and a significant portion of the oldest old will face their final years with inadequate economic resources."

Reading Professor Foreman's tightly focused paper suggests to me that there is, perhaps, a certain irony to all of this.  The irony is that by not embracing systemic change, Americans are engaging in a form of financial roulette, betting we won't live long enough to care about the outcome of our gamble. 

April 2, 2014 in Consumer Information, Ethical Issues, Federal Statutes/Regulations, Health Care/Long Term Care, Social Security, Statistics | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, April 1, 2014

NCLC offers free on-site elder advocacy training

Free on-site or webinar trainings are available for elder advocates this spring.  The National Elder Rights Training Project provides training on a wide range of law and aging topics to legal services providers and elder advocates nationwide.  Priority for on-site training is offered to states involved in the Model Approaches to Statewide Legal Assistance Systems demonstration grants.  However other organizations may also apply.  Preference will be given to organizations that can commit to marketing and outreach for the training event to attract the targeted audience.  The training is free and the National Consumer Law Center or another partner from the National Legal Resource Center will conduct the training.  While the trainings are offered on a wide range of topics, selection of the organization is in part based on availability of trainers.  Currently expert trainers are available on a wide range of consumer law topics. 

The training application is available at http://www.nlrc.aoa.gov/NLRC/Training_Request/Index.aspx.  You may also contact Odette Williamson at owilliamson@nclc.org with questions.

April 1, 2014 in Consumer Information, Programs/CLEs | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Book Talk: About Having "That" Talk with Your Kids

Washington Post writer Michelle Singletary hosts a column called The Color of Money.  Recently she wrote about the importance of talking with your adult children about your preferences and finances "long before a health crisis forces the issue" that may put them in the position of caregivers.  At the same time, she acknowledges this conversation isn't easy to start. 

For assistance she suggests the book "The Other Talk: A Guide to Talking With Your Adult Children About the Rest of You Life," by author Tim Prosch.   To further the conversation, Singletary and Prosch are hosting an on-line dicussion about "The Other Talk" on Thursday, April 24 at noon, Eastern time.  Here's the link to the Washington Post forum for the program.  

April 1, 2014 in Advance Directives/End-of-Life, Consumer Information, Health Care/Long Term Care | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Sunday, March 16, 2014

Solving the Mystery of Lost Items in Care Facilities?

Remember the first time you went to camp and your mother put labels on all of your clothes?  At the other end of the timeline is the need to keep track of personal items, clothing and eye glasses in senior care facilities.  One of the most common complaints in residential care is "missing" things ... like your dad's favorite red sweater. 

Now there is new tool to help staff get items back in their proper place -- and the tool is useful whether the location is camp, college or a nursing home.

Check out identaMe labels -- waterproof, self-sticking, laundry-friendly and colorful.  You can order pre-printed labels on-line, complete with your loved one's name and a "catchy" logo.

March 16, 2014 in Consumer Information, Health Care/Long Term Care, Housing | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, March 7, 2014

New York: Court Refuses "Unconscionable" Foreclosure of Reverse Mortgage

In MetLife Home Loans v. Vareen, decided in Kings County, New York on February 11, the mortgage company attempted to foreclose on a reverse mortgage, apparently because of unpaid water bills for the property.   The case was "conferenced extensively with the defendant homeowner's family in the court's Foreclosure Settlement Conference Part," with no resolution of the dispute, but the homeowner did not file a formal answer in the lawsuit.  Eventually the mortgage company sought an "ex parte" default ruling. 

In denying the requested relief, the judge noted that the homeowner had a contractual obligation to stay current on all items which could become charges against the property.  However, the mortgage company also had the contractual option to "make the payment for the mortgagor and charge the mortgagor's account. If a pattern of missed payments occurs, the [mortgage company] may establish procedures to pay the property charges from the mortgagor's funds as if the mortgagor elected to have the mortgagee pay the property charges under this section."  It appears the homeowner was receiving monthly "reverse mortgage payments," rather than a single lump sum.

This history of the case is a reminder that reverse mortgages may not be the best solution for some older homeowners, especially if the cost to maintain the house is substantial, or if the elderly homeowner (or a volunteer in the family) is unable to handle payment of bills as they come due.

Here the court stepped in to prevent loss of the home, citing the lender's contract options.  The court quoted the rosy language of a HUD-approved consumer guide, appearing to assure borrowers they can "continue to live at home as long as you want," and concluded:

"As such, plaintiff cannot foreclose on defendant's reverse mortgage because of her default in paying the NYC water bill. Furthermore, serving a senior citizen holding a reverse mortgage with a complaint that fails to specify what the default is can only be described as unconscionable."

Other court challenges to attempts to foreclose on reverse mortgages where there is a "surviving" spouse, but that individual is not an owner of record, are detailed here, with the potential class of plaintiffs represented by an AARP Foundation Litigation team.  Thanks to ElderLawGuy Jeff Marshall for tweeting on AARP's efforts. 

March 7, 2014 in Consumer Information, Housing | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, March 5, 2014

NPR: Living Wills are the "Talk of the Town"

Apparently a lot of us were having "driveway" moments today, listening to NPR on the way to work and lingering in the car to hear the finish of the story.  My Penn State colleague Amy Gaudion popped into my office to tell me of the "amazing" piece she had just heard, and a few minutes later I received an email from a friend who recommended that same radio story. 

So, here's the link to the much recommended piece from NPR's Morning Edition, "Living Wills are the Talk of the Town in La Crosse, Wisconsin." 

March 5, 2014 in Advance Directives/End-of-Life, Consumer Information | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

"Choosing Wisely" -- Recommendations for Medications & Treatments in Senior Care

The American Geriatrics Society and the American Board of Internal Medicine Foundation have joined in a venture called "Choosing Wisely," and recently issued "Five Things Physicians and Patients Should Question." 

The items are intended to stimulate more thoughtful decision making, especially in dementia care, and address diet, restraints, and use of screening tests.  Two items that hit home include:

  • Don't prescribe cholinesterase inhibitors for dementia without periodic assessment for perceived cognitive benefits and adverse gastrointestinal effects.
  • Don't prescribe any medication without conducting a drug regimen review.

This "Five Things" list was actually the second set of "Choosing Wisely" recommendations.  Here's a link to the important first list, which includes the concern about off-label prescriptions of antipsychotic medications to treat symptoms in dementia, a topic that has also been the subject of major whistleblower cases and settlements involving the pharmaceutical industry. 

March 5, 2014 in Cognitive Impairment, Consumer Information, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Ethical Issues, Health Care/Long Term Care | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, March 3, 2014

Turning Silver Into Gold?

While working in Ireland in 2010, I attended a conferencen in Dublin where the theme was "turning silver into gold." I was impressed when I arrived, as the conference was sold out and it was standing room only.  Speakers came from a wide range of academic and business fields, and the day ended with roundtable brainstorming sessions about business opportunities in serving the needs of seniors.  There was a lot of creative energy in the room.

At the same time, I recognized the possibility that the economic crisis that was in full sail at the time, deeply affecting Ireland, could be triggering both creativity and desperation.  Free enterprise often seems to walk the fine line between capitalizing on need and exploiting it.  Seniors may be particularly vulnerable as clients, if the fine line is breached. 

I was reminded of the potential for duality as I read a very interesting article in the New York Times, by Jill Caryl Weiner, "Of Crime and Punishment, Redemption and Aerobics."  Here are two paragraphs from the thoughtful exploration of a senior fitness business plan, that started small with aerobics classes in senior centers:

"Mr. Mickens dreams big. Right now, as president and C.E.O. of the Tommy Experience, a fitness company focused on older adults, he says he wants to turn his company into an international brand, as big as Bally Total Fitness and Equinox. He envisions sports merchandisers like Nike and Under Armour sponsoring his company and providing comfortable workout clothes for the 60-and-above set, 'to sponsor their grandmothers, aunts and grandfathers like they would sponsor kids or a team.'

 

While his stated mission is to help older people transform themselves, it is also about his own transformation — and redemption. In 1989, Mr. Mickens, then 25, was convicted of conspiracy to distribute cocaine, money laundering and tax evasion. He was fined $1 million and sentenced to 35 years in federal prison."

It is good to read about redemption and senior services coming together in healthy ways, with the hope that everyone also "exercises" healthy realisim about the business model.   

March 3, 2014 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, February 13, 2014

Nat. Senior Citizens Law Center Calls for Stronger Rules re Assisted Living

The National Senior Citizens Law Center, with offices in California and D.C., has used its close observation of laws regulating "assisted living" across the U.S., to call for stronger rules in California, on the ground that "California lags far behind" in adopting moderns standards for quality of service and care.

NSCLC's latest report, "Best Practices in Assisted Living: Considering Potential Reforms for California, coauthored by Eric Carlson and Gwen Orlowski, is available on their website, along with the latest news on hearings before California legislative bodies on assisted living regulatory issues.

February 13, 2014 in Consumer Information, Housing, State Statutes/Regulations | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, February 11, 2014

Career Development: Fellowship Applications Due to Borchard April 15

The Borchard Foundation Center for Law and Aging reminds us that the application window is now open to apply for 2014-15 Borchard fellowship funding.  The program provides three law school graduates the opportunity to pursue their research and professional interests for a year in law and aging. 

The fellowship is $42,500 and is intended as a full-time position only. The fellowship period runs from July 1 to June 30 each year, or for the calendar year beginning the month after the fellow’s completion of a state bar examination. 

Examples of activities and projects by Borchard Fellows: 

·     Working with an established legal services program to enable vulnerable, isolated, low-income seniors to age-in-place by addressing their unmet legal needs; 

·     Providing holistic services to older clients facing consumer debt and foreclosure-related concerns; 

·     Implementation of a courthouse project to help elderly pro se tenants achieve long-term housing stabilization through the interdisciplinary use of legal representation and social services, allowing more elderly tenants to “age in place” at home; 

·     Development of a non-profit senior law resource center providing direct legal services and public education; 

·     Development of an interdisciplinary elder law clinical program at a major public university law school; 

·     Development of a mediation component for a legal services program elder law hotline; 

·     Development of an interdisciplinary project for graduate students in law, medicine, and health advocacy to foster understanding and collaboration between professions.

For more details on how to apply before April 15, 2014 deadline, see details here

February 11, 2014 in Consumer Information, Grant Deadlines/Awards, Legal Practice/Practice Management | Permalink | TrackBack (0)