Sunday, January 29, 2017

Tuesday and Wednesday: Call Your Senator and Representative on Aging Issues

There is a lot of buzz about changes to programs that impact elders and none of us knows what the end results will be. The Leadership Council on Aging Organizations has designated Tuesday (January 31) and Wednesday (February 1) as call your Senators and Representatives days. Here is the information from the American Society on Aging:

The Leadership Council of Aging Organizations (LCAO), of which ASA is a member, is organizing call-in days next Tuesday and Wednesday, January 31 and February 1. This is an opportunity for you to contact your Senators and Representatives to let them know of your concerns about preserving these major programs. To participate, dial 866-426-2631. You’ll hear a brief overview of the issues, and then be asked to enter your zip code to be connected with your legislators.

ASA offers some tips on talking points, available here.  

January 29, 2017 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Federal Statutes/Regulations, Medicaid, Medicare | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, January 26, 2017

Generational Divide: Millenials & Boomers: Financial Health

The Young Invincibles recently released a report that looks at the financial health of the Millennials. The Financial Health of Young America "compares the financial health of young Americans in 1989 compared to today’s young adults to reveal major declines across five key factors – income, assets, net wealth, home ownership and retirement savings.  In summary, Boomers had higher incomes, owned more homes, and had twice the net assets that Millennials have today."

In addition, the report notes the following key findings:

  • Millennials have earned a net wealth half that of Boomers at the same age. 
  •  Young adult workers today earn $10,000 less than young adults in 1989, a decline of 20 percent.
  •             Education attainment still an individual’s best pathway to financial security.

  • When Boomers were young adults, they owned twice the amount of assets as young adults.
  • Disturbing racial inequality persists and grows. Young African Americans’ median wealth declined by a third since 1989.
  •             Student debt blunts some of education’s benefits.

The report makes various recommendations in the following categories: skills, education,  income, employment benefits, housing policies, improving the ability to save and gain wealth,  and improve portable retirement choices.  This is the first of several reports. The full report runs 30 pages and is available here.

January 26, 2017 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Housing, Retirement | Permalink | Comments (0)

Are Health Care Insurers Using "Costs" of ACA Exchanges to Justify Merger Plans?

From the Los Angeles Times, there is this interesting account from the antitrust lawsuit examining the proposed merger of Aetna and Humana health organizations: 

Aetna claimed this summer that it was pulling out of all but four of the 15 states where it was providing Obamacare individual insurance because of a business decision — it was simply losing too much money on the Obamacare exchanges.

 

Now a federal judge has ruled that that was a rank falsehood. In fact, says Judge John D. Bates, Aetna made its decision at least partially in response to a federal antitrust lawsuit blocking its proposed $37-billion merger with Humana. Aetna threatened federal officials with the pullout before the lawsuit was filed, and followed through on its threat once it was filed. Bates made the observations in the course of a ruling he issued Monday blocking the merger.

 

Aetna executives had moved heaven and earth to conceal their decision-making process from the court, in part by discussing the matter on the phone rather than in emails, and by shielding what did get put in writing with the cloak of attorney-client privilege, a practice Bates found came close to “malfeasance.”

For more, read U.S. judge finds that Aetna deceived the public about its reasons for quitting Obamacare

January 26, 2017 in Consumer Information, Ethical Issues, Federal Statutes/Regulations, Health Care/Long Term Care | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, January 25, 2017

Retiring Abroad

The Denver Post ran an AP story a few weeks ago about Americans retiring abroad. Growing number of Americans are retiring outside the U.S.  highlights the increase in the number of Americans who decide to retire and live abroad. "The number grew 17 percent between 2010 and 2015 and is expected to increase over the next 10 years as more baby boomers retire... Just under 400,000 American retirees are now living abroad, according to the Social Security Administration. The countries they have chosen most often: Canada, Japan, Mexico, Germany and the United Kingdom." The article references a lower cost of living or cheaper health care as a reason some Americans choose to retire to other countries.  Climate may also be a factor.  It would be an interesting exercise for students to list the issues and considerations when clients decide to retire to another country.  Anyone want to assign this as a project?

January 25, 2017 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, International, Retirement | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, January 24, 2017

Medicaid and the Middle Class

The Long Term Care Community Coalition recently released a publication, Medicaid: A Lifeline for Middle Class Families. This one page pdf document discusses 7 topics:

  • Financial Security For Middle Class Families.
  • Forty Percent Of People Who Reach Age 65 Will Need Nursing Home Care.
  • Peace Of Mind For Middle Class Families.
  • Millions Of Americans Are Providing Care And Support Today To An Older Adult.
  • Ensuring Skilled Dementia Care
  • Essential Protections For Frail Elderly And Their Families
  • Preserving Life In The Community.

January 24, 2017 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Federal Statutes/Regulations, Health Care/Long Term Care, Medicaid | Permalink | Comments (0)

New Article JAMA Psychiatry on Dementia & Delirium

JAMA Psychiatry published  a new study on January 18, 2017 on Delirium, Dementia, and Decline.  The full article is available for free. The authors' summary, available here, explains

Delirium and dementia are common causes of cognitive impairment in older populations. Although each may occur independently, delirium and dementia frequently coexist. Dementia is a leading risk factor for delirium, and there is an increased incidence of new dementia and cognitive decline after delirium. Delirium can accelerate the rate of cognitive decline, suggesting that an episode of delirium can result in a more rapid progression of dementia symptoms, leading to earlier functional disability, increased caregiver burden, and rising health care costs. As the population ages, there has been a rapid increase in the incidence and prevalence of delirium and dementia. Better understanding of the risk factors, outcomes, and mechanistic associations between these 2 conditions is therefore critical for developing successful prevention and treatment strategies for this increasing problem.

The conclusions and relevance from the article offers this:

CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Delirium in the presence of the pathologic processes of dementia is associated with accelerated cognitive decline beyond that expected for delirium or the pathologic process itself. These findings suggest that additional unmeasured pathologic processes specifically relate to delirium. Age-related cognitive decline has many contributors, and these findings at the population level support a role for delirium acting independently and multiplicatively to the pathologic processes of classic dementia.

January 24, 2017 in Cognitive Impairment, Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Health Care/Long Term Care, Statistics | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, January 22, 2017

National Guardianship Ass'n Releases Updated Agency Standards

The National Guardianship Association, NGA, released updated Standards of Practice for Agencies and Programs Providing Guardianship Services. The standards are free and can be downloaded here. Here is some information about the standards taken from an email announcing their release:

NGA's purpose in this document is to provide guidance for programs striving to provide quality guardianship services. While aspirational, the standards convey good business practice that agencies and states should consider adopting into policy or law.

NGA has defined Standards of Practice for the day-to-day provision of guardianship services. Those standards apply to all guardians whether professional guardians, volunteer guardians or family members. This document defines additional NGA standards for acceptable business practice and program design for non-family guardians who are developing or operating agencies or programs providing professional guardianship services.

January 22, 2017 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship | Permalink | Comments (1)

Friday, January 20, 2017

Update on D.C. Physician-Aided Dying Law

We blogged previously that D.C.'s mayor signed the physician-aided dying bill that was then sent to Congress. According to a January 9, 2017 article in the Washington Post, Congressman plans to block D.C. law to let terminally ill patients end their lives, "Representative Jason Chaffetz (R-Utah) said ...  he’ll use rarely invoked congressional authority to block a new law passed by the D.C. Council to allow doctors to help end the lives of terminally ill patients in the city"  by the end of January.  The article notes that it's rare for Congress to block a D.C. law.   On January 12, 2017 Senator Lankford and Representative Wenstrup (Oklahoma and Ohio respectively) introduced resolutions to block the law.

Stay tuned.

January 20, 2017 in Advance Directives/End-of-Life, Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Federal Statutes/Regulations, Health Care/Long Term Care, State Statutes/Regulations | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, January 19, 2017

Social Media Use by Age

Do you use social media? You aren't alone if you are.  Pew Research released a new social media fact sheet that breaks down social media use, with 69% of Americans using social media at some time. But since this is an elderlawprof blog, I know you want to know more--specifically the percentage of older persons using social media. Wait no longer! 34% of those 65 and older used social media as of the time of the survey, with  64% of those age 50-64 using social media.   But which social media are older persons using?  That 50-64 age group has a significant presence on Facebook, 61%, compared to 36% of those 65 and older. Pinterest and LinkedIn came in close seconds for those 50-64 (24% and 21% respectively). LinkedIn was a distant second for those 65 and over.  Another report from Pew breaks out usage by social media platforms.

 

 

January 19, 2017 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Other, Web/Tech | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, January 17, 2017

Mobile Palliative Care for Homeless

Kaiser Health News ran a story about a project that provides palliative care to individuals who are homeless and terminally ill. Mobile Team Offers Comfort Care To Homeless At Life’s End covers a pilot project in Seattle. "Since January 2014, the pilot project run by Seattle/King County Health Care for Homeless Network and UW Medicine’s Harborview Medical Center has served more than 100 seriously ill men and women in the Seattle area, tracking them down at shelters and drop-in clinics, in tents under bridges and parked cars." The project is funded through 2017 and is designed to avoid unneeded or unwanted care at the end of life while giving people who are homeless input in their care.  The care providers arrange for the clients to get medical treatment (through Medicaid or pro bono care), follow up with patients, help patients make decisions and care for them so they don't die alone.

The mobile program has some advantages over other existing programs, such as going to where the patients are located and  the providers are "more likely to engage the hardest-to-reach patients, those distrustful of medical care and outsiders...."  Although the medical treatment is important, so far, the team is finding that coordination of care is a huge benefit of the mobile program.  Mobile palliative care programs do exist worldwide, but aren't prevalent in the U.S. "Worldwide, there are only a few other mobile palliative care programs, all outside the U.S. The closest one in North America is the Palliative Education and Care for the Homeless program — known as PEACH — in Toronto."

January 17, 2017 in Advance Directives/End-of-Life, Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Health Care/Long Term Care, Medicaid | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, January 16, 2017

Health & Safety Checks by Meals on Wheels?

So Meals on Wheels has an idea. We all know the dangers of isolation and how important it can be to check in with an elder on a regular basis.  Kaiser Health News explains the idea, Meals On Wheels Wants To Be The ‘Eyes and Ears’ For Hospitals, Doctors. "Meals on Wheels, which has served seniors for more than 60 years through a network of independent nonprofits, is trying to formalize the health and safety checks its volunteers already conduct during their daily home visits to seniors. Through an ongoing campaign dubbed “More Than a Meal,” the organization hopes to demonstrate that it can play a critical role in the health care system."

Many nonprofits face challenges, including funding challenges, and Meals on Wheels is no exception. There are competitors now,  less funding and increasing demand for services.  So how would this work?  "Meals on Wheels America and several of the local programs around the country have launched partnerships with insurers, hospitals and health systems. By reporting to providers any physical or mental changes they observe, volunteers can help improve seniors’ health and reduce unnecessary emergency room visits and nursing home placements, said Ellie Hollander, CEO of Meals on Wheels America."  It's a very cost-effective system according to the article and has the potential for bigger savings in health care costs.

There has already been some research done on the effectiveness and advantages of Meals on Wheels. Consider this:

Studies conducted by Brown University researchers have shown that meal deliveries can help elderly people stay out of nursing homes, reduce falls and save states money.

Kali Thomas, an assistant professor at Brown University School of Public Health, estimated that if all states increased the number of older people receiving the meals by 1 percent, they would save more than $100 million. Research also has shown that the daily meal deliveries helped seniors’ mental health and eased their fears of being institutionalized.

There are  projects taking place, with one between Meals on Wheels, Brown U and West Health Institute.  Another is with Meals on Wheels,  Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center and Meals on Wheels of Central Maryland, which will attempt "to keep seniors at home and reduce their need for costly health services after hospitalization. The idea is to have trained volunteers report red flags and ensure, for example, that patients with congestive heart failure are weighing themselves regularly and eating properly."  The Maryland project is being run by Dr. Dan Hale (friend and former colleague at Stetson U).

Sounds like a great idea! 

January 16, 2017 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Food and Drink, Health Care/Long Term Care, Other | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, January 15, 2017

Mark Your Calendar-DOJ webinar

Do you know about the DOJ Elder Justice Initiative? If not, then this webinar is for you. Even if you do know about it, still register for this webinar!  According to the email I received,

On January 26, 2017, the Elder Justice Initiative will be hosting a webinar to highlight resources and information available on the Elder Justice Website. 

This webinar will be hosted by Susan Lynch and Sid Stahl and will introduce you to the Department of Justice’s Elder Justice Website and will help you to navigate the many tools and resources available on DOJ’s website for elder abuse prosecutors, law enforcement, victim advocates, victims, families, caregivers, and elder abuse researchers.  These tools can help you find assistance when in need, get involved in combatting elder abuse and financial exploitation, and educate you on elder justice programs operating at the federal, state, and local levels. 

Registration opens the week before the webinar.

January 15, 2017 in Consumer Information, Crimes, Current Affairs, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Federal Statutes/Regulations, Programs/CLEs, Webinars | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, January 13, 2017

Should All States Permit Use of Medicaid for Assisted Living?

The plight of 108-year-old Ohio resident Carrie Rausch, facing the prospect of losing her spot in an assisted living community because she's run out of money, is generating a lot of attention in the media, including People magazine.  Some states, such as New Jersey, have expanded the options for public assistance in senior living -- beyond nursing homes -- to permit eligible individuals to use Medicaid for residential care.  Assisted living is usually much less expensive than a nursing home; but the pool of individuals who would might opt for assisted living rather than the "dreaded" nursing home is also larger.   Ohio, along with many states, hasn't gone the AL route:  

If Rausch can’t raise the money needed, she’ll have to leave what has been her home for the past three years and move into a nursing home that accepts Medicaid.

[Daughter] Hatfield worries about the toll the move would take on her mom, who is more lively and active than most people 10 or even 20 years her junior. . . . “We need a miracle,” she says.

Ms Rausch's adult daughter -- herself in her late 60s -- has turned to GoFundMe to attempt to raise the $40k needed for a year of continued residence, and as of the date of this Blog post, more than 700 donors have responded.  

At a deeper level, however, this story reveals important questions about public funding for long-term care on a state-by-state basis. This funding issue is repeating itself throughout the country for seniors much younger than the frugal and relatively healthy Carrie Rausch.  On a national basis, GoFundMe "miracles" seem an impractical solution.

January 13, 2017 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Ethical Issues, Health Care/Long Term Care, Housing, Medicaid, State Cases, State Statutes/Regulations | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, January 12, 2017

Superagers, the New Super Heroes?

Who doesn't want to be a super "something"? How about a Superager? What is a Superager anyway? (and no, capes and tights are not needed). According to a recent story in the NY Times, Superagers are "those whose memory and attention isn’t merely above average for their age, but is actually on par with healthy, active 25-year-olds." How to Become a ‘Superager’ reports on a study of the brains of Superagers to figure out what makes them so.

How do you become a Superager?  Well, the researchers aren't quite ready to tell us that yet. 

Of course, the big question is: How do you become a superager? Which activities, if any, will increase your chances of remaining mentally sharp into old age? We’re still studying this question, but our best answer at the moment is: work hard at something. Many labs have observed that these critical brain regions increase in activity when people perform difficult tasks, whether the effort is physical or mental. You can therefore help keep these regions thick and healthy through vigorous exercise and bouts of strenuous mental effort.

There is a downside to becoming a Superager, according to the story.  The author explains

The road to superaging is difficult, though, because these brain regions have another intriguing property: When they increase in activity, you tend to feel pretty bad — tired, stymied, frustrated. Think about the last time you grappled with a math problem or pushed yourself to your physical limits. Hard work makes you feel bad in the moment. The Marine Corps has a motto that embodies this principle: “Pain is weakness leaving the body.” That is, the discomfort of exertion means you’re building muscle and discipline. Superagers are like Marines: They excel at pushing past the temporary unpleasantness of intense effort. Studies suggest that the result is a more youthful brain that helps maintain a sharper memory and a greater ability to pay attention.

This means that pleasant puzzles like Sudoku are not enough to provide the benefits of superaging. Neither are the popular diversions of various “brain game” websites. You must expend enough effort that you feel some “yuck.” Do it till it hurts, and then a bit more.

The author points to the desire of Americans to pursue happiness, which leads us to" consistently sidestep the discomfort of mental effort or physical exertion, this restraint can be detrimental to the brain. All brain tissue gets thinner from disuse. If you don’t use it, you lose it."

So shall we all work on becoming Superagers?  The author closes the article with this bit of advice, "make a New Year’s resolution to take up a challenging activity. Learn a foreign language. Take an online college course. Master a musical instrument. Work that brain. Make it a year to remember."

Also remember, capes and tights are optional!

 

January 12, 2017 in Cognitive Impairment, Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Health Care/Long Term Care, Other | Permalink | Comments (0)

Should Home Care Providers Be Permitted to Seek Broad Waivers of Liability from Elderly Clients? (And if so, are there clear standards for a knowing waiver?}

Recently an attorney wrote to me about an elderly client who had been victimized by a home care worker hired through an agency; the allegations included physical abuse, intimidation, identity theft, failure to provide care, theft of personal possessions and false imprisonment.  Not too surprisingly, the specific worker was long gone once the harm was discovered by non-resident family members.  Significantly, the family also learned that the mother had signed the agency's standard contract withtwo pages of single-spaced type that covered everything from hours to wages, and which included a numbered paragraph purporting to grant a broad waiver of the agency's liability for actions of the individuals sent to the home of the elderly client. Key language provided:

"CLIENT and/or CLIENT's agent/responsible party agrees on behalf of CLIENT, CLIENT's agent/responsible party, beneficiaries, heirs, and/or family/household members to release [agency], owner, officers, directors, agents and employees, office, office directors, office employees, and Caregiver from any and all liability, potential or real, for any injury, claim, damage, or loss, including attorney's fees, incurred in connection with the performance of this agreement and all services, incurred in connection with the performance of this agreement and all services performed by Caregiver for the CLIENT, including but no limited to assisting CLIENT with his/her medications and providing transportation to Client or any member of CLIENT's family/household, except for gross negligence...."  

The attorney asked about any state regulatory language that would limit liability waivers or require, at a minimum, bold faced type or large type for such attempted waivers when used with elderly or disabled clients. Those receiving home care may be uniquely vulnerable to unwitnessed abuse, and also less likely to report abuse because of the fear of the "worse" alternative, a nursing home.   In the state in question, regulations  require certain disclosures to be made in a form "easily read and understood," but the regulations don't specifically address (nor prohibit) waivers of the company's liability. See e.g. PA Code Section 611.57.    

What about in your state? Is there relevant regulation? Alternatively, is there a "best" (or at least better) practice in the home care industry when seeking contractual waivers of liability?  The issue reminds me of an article written in the mid-1990s by Charlie Sabbatino discussing the one-sided nature of nursing home contracts in the absence of careful regulation protecting patient rights.  He wrote:

Broadly worded waivers of liability for personal injury are likely to be unenforceable and void as a matter of public policy in most states. Residents are most commonly asked to consent to absolute waivers for injury caused by other patients or by independent contractors in the facility, or for injury occurring outside of the facility, such as on a field trip. Federal and state nursing home laws have not squarely addressed personal injury waivers. even though the whole thrust of the regulatory framework is expressly intended to set standards for the protection of residents' health, safety, and welfare.

And the subtitle of the article on Nursing Home Contracts is "Undermining Rights the Older Fashioned Way." 

January 12, 2017 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Ethical Issues, Health Care/Long Term Care, State Cases, State Statutes/Regulations | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, January 11, 2017

When Was the Last Time You Looked at Your Retirement Account?

A recent article in the Washington Post by Michelle Singletary suggested a New Year's resolution, knowing your retirement account. Resolve to take a closer look at your retirement account offers insights from author (Empire of the Fund: The Way We Save Now), William A. Birdthistle, who participated recently in her online discussion.   The article contains 3 questions and Mr. Birdthistle's answers, one of which discusses in what types of investments to invest retirement funds. Ms. Singletary closes her article with this advice to readers: "Let 2017 be the year that you take a closer look at your retirement savings. Don’t just blindly throw money in your account. No one can predict the unpredictable when it comes to your nest egg. But at least you can become better informed about what there is to know for sure."

Thanks to Professor Naomi Cahn for sending us this article.

January 11, 2017 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Retirement | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, January 10, 2017

Register Now: Free Webinar on Recognizing and Preventing Scams

The American Bar Association Senior Lawyers Division is offering a free webinar on January 19 at noon on scams, as part of its series on preventing elder abuse.  The webinar will include panelists from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, DOJ and the Harry & Jeanette Weinberg Center for Elder Abuse Prevention.  Topics to be covered include the frequency of elder abuse, trends in scams, scam prevention, what to do if a victim, and civil remedies. Click here to register.

 

 

 

January 10, 2017 in Consumer Information, Crimes, Current Affairs, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Webinars | Permalink | Comments (0)

Medicare Overpayments

Kaiser Health News ran a story last week on the failure of CMS to recover significant overpayments from some Medicare Advantage plans. Medicare Failed To Recover Up To $125 Million In Overpayments, Records Show explains

An initial round of audits found that Medicare had potentially overpaid five of the health plans $128 million in 2007 alone, according to confidential government documents released recently in response to a public records request and lawsuit.

But officials never recovered most of that money. Under intense pressure from the health insurance industry, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services quietly backed off their repayment demands and settled the audits in 2012 for just under $3.4 million — shortchanging taxpayers by up to $125 million in possible overcharges just for 2007.

The story reports the overpayments occur for various reasons, including billing errors and from "overcharge[ing] Medicare, often by overstating the severity of medical conditions...."  The story reports on CMS audits of some health plans, events that led up to the settlement of the overpayment claims and a May, 2016 GAO report.

January 10, 2017 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Federal Statutes/Regulations, Health Care/Long Term Care, Medicare | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, January 9, 2017

Social Security Full Retirement Age in 2017

Social Security's blog, Social Security Matters, posted the full retirement age info for 2017. 2017 Brings New Changes to Full Retirement Age explains that for those between 1955-1956, full retirement age is 66 and 2 months.  The post also explains what the increase in full retirement age means to benefits: "[a]s the full retirement age continues to increase, there are greater reductions in benefits if you claim them before you reach full retirement age.  For example, if you apply for benefits in 2017 at age 62, your monthly benefit amount will be reduced nearly 26 percent." The blog also offers tips to those who are contemplating retirement along with helpful links.

January 9, 2017 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Federal Statutes/Regulations, Retirement, Social Security | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, January 6, 2017

Alzheimer's: Greater Impact on Women?

I was reading a recent blog post on the Scientific American  that featured a guest blog by Dr. Snyder, the Senior Director of Medical and Scientific Operations, Medical and Scientific Relations for the Alzheimer's Association. The blog, Alzheimer's Falls More Heavily on Women Than on Men, opens with two vignettes of women who early-onset Alzheimer's.

Alzheimer’s dementia disproportionately affects women in a variety of ways. Compared with men, 2.5 times as many women as men provide 24-hour care for an affected relative. Nearly 19 percent of these wives, sisters and daughters have had to quit work to do so. In addition, women make up nearly two-thirds of the more than 5 million Americans living with Alzheimer’s today.

The blog explains that researchers are studying this to see if they can find the answer, but longevity alone isn't likely it.  The post also reports on the work of the Alzheimer's Association including a funding initiative for 9 research projects. Some are looking at lifestyle factors including stress and education. The article concludes with a discussion of the role and importance of advocacy

January 6, 2017 in Cognitive Impairment, Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Health Care/Long Term Care, Science | Permalink | Comments (0)