Tuesday, August 22, 2017

DOJ Webinar Financial Exploitation in the Context of Guardianships and Other Legal Arrangements

Mark your calendars for September 6, 2017 at 2:00 p.m. edt. DOJ's Elder Justice Initiative will be hosting another in its series of webinars on elder abuse.  More information and registration for Financial Exploitation in the Context of Guardianships and Other Legal Arrangements will be available soon.

August 22, 2017 in Cognitive Impairment, Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Programs/CLEs, State Statutes/Regulations, Webinars | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, August 21, 2017

Affordable & Accessible Community-Based Housing for Vulnerable Adults

A new publication is available from the National Academies Press. Developing Affordable and  Accessible Community-Based  Housing for Vulnerable Adults: PROCEEDINGS OF A WORKSHOP is available for download as a pdf or for purchase as a print copy.   Here is an excerpt from the introduction

Accessible and affordable housing can enable community living,2 maximize independence, and promote health for vulnerable populations. However, the United States faces a shortage of affordable and accessible housing for vulnerable low-income older adults and individuals living with disabilities. This shortage is expected to grow over the coming years given the population shifts leading to greater numbers of older adults and of individuals living with disabilities.

Housing is a social determinant of health and has direct effects on health outcomes, but this relationship has not been thoroughly investigated. To better understand the importance of affordable and accessible housing for older adults and people with disabilities, the barriers to providing this housing, the design principles for making housing accessible for these individuals, and the features of programs and policies that successfully provide affordable and accessible housing that supports community living for older adults and people with disabilities ....

The forum meets to discuss how to support independence and community living for people with disabilities and older adults. The roundtable promotes health equity and the elimination of health disparities by advancing the visibility and understanding of the inequities in health and health care among racial and ethnic populations; by amplifying research, policy, and community-centered programs; and by catalyzing the emergence of new leaders, partners, and stakeholders.

The book runs 108 pages and the pdf is a free download.

August 21, 2017 in Books, Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Federal Statutes/Regulations, Housing | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, August 20, 2017

Hospice Compare

CMS has announced the release of the Hospice Compare website.  Here's the information from the Medicare website:

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) is working diligently to make healthcare quality information more transparent and understandable for consumers in all stages of life to empower them to take ownership of their healthcare choices. This includes decisions about end-of-life care, when consumers in a time of vulnerability need transparent, digestible information to make the best choice for their care or the care of their loved ones.

We at CMS understand that there are many difficult decisions that come with a terminal illness—including deciding if hospice is right for you and which hospice to choose—which is why we have launched Hospice Compare. This new website will help empower you by allowing you to easily and quickly compare hospice providers on various aspects of care and assess the quality of care that potential hospices provide.

Hospice Compare provides information on hospices across the nation and allows patients, family members, caregivers, and healthcare providers to compare hospice providers based on some key quality metrics, like what percentage of a hospice provider’s patients were screened for pain or difficult or uncomfortable breathing and if their patients’ preferences are being met. Specifically, the quality measures look at the percentages of patients who received recommended treatment, for example:

  • Patients or caregivers who were invited to discuss treatment preferences, like hospitalization and resuscitation, at the beginning of hospice care;
  • Patients or caregivers who were invited to discuss beliefs and values at the beginning of hospice care;
  • Patients who were checked for pain at the beginning of hospice care;
  • Patients who received a timely and thorough pain assessment when pain was identified as a problem;
  • Patients who were checked for shortness of breath at the beginning of hospice care;
  • Patients who got timely treatment for shortness of breath; and
  • Patients taking opioid pain medication who were offered care for constipation.

The information on Hospice Compare can be used along with other information you gather about hospice providers in your area. In addition to reviewing the information on Hospice Compare, you’re encouraged to talk to your doctor, social worker, other healthcare providers, and other community resources when choosing the best hospice for care for you or your loved one.

In addition to Hospice Compare, Medicare also offers a number of other websites that can help you select providers and facilities to meet a wide range of care needs, including Inpatient Rehabilitation Facility Compare; Long-Term Care Hospital Compare; Hospital Compare; Physician Compare; Nursing Home Compare; Medicare Plan Finder; Dialysis Compare; and Home Health Compare.

Hospice Compare is available here

August 20, 2017 in Advance Directives/End-of-Life, Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Federal Statutes/Regulations, Health Care/Long Term Care, Medicare | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, August 18, 2017

Mysteries at the End of Life

Every once in a while, I find something so well written, that even if not strictly speaking an "elder law" related piece, I have to share it here.  

Here's one such example.  Of course, under the right combination of circumstances, given the secrets people hold to their last hours, there certainly could be legal consequences of the mysteries discussed by Hospice Chaplain Kerry Egan in her piece for the New York Times, "Married to a Mystery Man." 

 

August 18, 2017 in Consumer Information, Crimes, Current Affairs, Ethical Issues | Permalink | Comments (0)

Dropping "Anti-Aging" From Vocabulary

I'm sure all of us have seen ads about fighting aging, or a product that is promoted as "anti-aging."  I always am puzzled; it seems that we are in a battle against aging.  So an article in Huffington Post caught my eye. Allure Just Banned The Term ‘Anti-Aging’ And Everyone Else Should, Too explains the company "will no longer use the term “anti-aging,” acknowledging that growing older is something that should be embraced and appreciated rather than resisted or talked about as if it’s a condition that drains away beauty." The article explains that the "anti" label reinforces a negative message about aging being something that is to be fought. The magazine's statement, "Allure Magazine Will No Longer Use the Term 'Anti-Aging'" is available here.

August 18, 2017 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Other | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, August 17, 2017

House Hearing on Right to Try Bill

The federal right to try law's next stop is the House of Representatives. The article in Kaiser Health News, House Expected To Hold Hearings On ‘Right-To-Try’ Bill That Senator Tied To FDA Funding  provides this background

The Senate quickly passed the bill that would allow dying patients access to experimental drugs after Sen. Ron Johnson (R-Wis.) had threatened to slow down consideration of a separate bill to renew the FDA’s fee-collection authority. In other drug industry news, the FDA is implementing new rules about hiring foreign scientists, industry tightens controls to keep out counterfeit drugs, cancer trials are low on patients and costs of old drugs rising quickly for Medicaid.

Although given priority by the Senate, the bill isn't expected to get the same treatment by the House. According to an article in Roll Call,  ‘Right to Try’ Bill Could Face Slower Action in House if the House committee changes the bill from the Senate version, things will slow down.  Here's a bit of an overview from the article:

Currently, when a patient seeks access to an experimental drug, his or her physician must work with the drug company, the FDA and an institutional review board that signs off on drug testing to approve the treatment’s use. When originally introduced in January, Johnson’s bill would have taken the FDA and other government entities out of that process. It would have let the states define “terminal illness,” potentially leading to dozens of different standards across the country about who would qualify for access. It also would have prevented the FDA from using outcomes associated with the experimental use when considering the drug’s application.

The new bill, instead of leaving the definition of terminal illness to the states, says that eligible patients should have a “life-threatening disease or condition” as defined by current federal law. It also gives the FDA the right to use outcome data if the administration determines that it is critical to assessing the drug’s safety — or if the drug company wants the outcomes used.

The drug companies would also have to provide the FDA with information about the experimental uses. Like the original bill, the new version shields companies against liability, but extends that protection to manufacturers who chose not to grant access to treatments. The bill would also limit the drugs that can be provided to those that have already completed the first phase of formal clinical trials, which are conducted to assess drug safety.

 

 

August 17, 2017 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Federal Statutes/Regulations, Health Care/Long Term Care | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Marshall Kapp Recent Article on Factors Affecting End of Life Care in Elders

Professor Marshall Kapp has recently had an article published in 33 Ga. State Law Review 869. Distinctive Factors Affecting the Legal Context of End-Of-Life Medical Care For Older Persons is the lead article in a symposium volume on end of life issues.  Here is the abstract for this article

Current legal regulation of medical care for individuals approaching the end of life in the United States is predicated essentially on a factual model emanating from a series of high-profile judicial opinions concerning the rights of adults who become either permanently unconscious or are clearly going to die soon with or without aggressive attempts of curative therapy.

The need for a flexible, adaptable approach to medically treating people approaching the end of their lives, and a similar openness to possible modification of the legal framework within which treatment choices are made and implemented, are particularly important when older individuals are involved. Of the approximately 2.5 million people who die each year in the U.S., about three-quarters of deaths occur among persons aged sixty-five and older. As stated succinctly by historian Jill Lepore, “[t]he longer we live, the longer we die.”

This article outlines a few of the most salient clinical and social factors that distinguish the large and growing cohort of older persons, in potentially legally and policy relevant ways, from other population groups for whom end-of-life medical treatment choices may come into play. Some practice and policy implications are alluded to briefly.

Thanks to Professor Kapp for letting me know about his article!

 

August 15, 2017 in Advance Directives/End-of-Life, Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Health Care/Long Term Care | Permalink

Monday, August 14, 2017

Medicare Observation Status Disproportionate Impact on Poor Elders

According to recent stories about Medicare observation status, poor elders may be harder hit by this than those with more affluence. Medicare’s Observation Care Policy More Likely To Affect Low-Income Seniors makes note of "[a] new study finds that low-income patients are more likely to be kept in the hospital under observation, and the higher out-of-pocket spending that accompanies not being officially admitted is a bigger burden for them."  The study referenced is published in the American Journal of Medicine. The article's abstract explains:

Medicare beneficiaries hospitalized under observation status are subject to cost-sharing with no spending limit under Medicare Part B. Since low-income status is associated with increased hospital utilization, there is concern that such beneficiaries may be at increased risk for high utilization and out-of-pocket costs related to observation care. Our objective was to determine whether low-income Medicare beneficiaries are at risk for high utilization and high financial liability for observation care compared to higher-income beneficiaries.

A subscription is required to access the full article.

August 14, 2017 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Federal Statutes/Regulations, Health Care/Long Term Care, Medicare | Permalink

Medicare End of LIfe Consults

Kaiser Health News recently ran a story about the end of life consultations now covered by Medicare. End-Of-Life Advice: More Than 500,000 Chat On Medicare’s Dime  offers some interesting statistics on the number of consults.  "In 2016, the first year health care providers were allowed to bill for the service, nearly 575,000 Medicare beneficiaries took part in the conversations, new federal data obtained by Kaiser Health News show." In fact, that number is almost double of what the AMA projected for 2016.  Although those numbers are good news for the proponents of the law, when compared to the numbers of Medicare beneficiaries overall, the percentage is quite low.

[O]nly a fraction of eligible Medicare providers — and patients — have used the benefit, which pays about $86 for the first 30-minute office visit and about $75 for additional sessions.... Nationwide, slightly more than 1 percent of the more than 56 million Medicare beneficiaries enrolled at the end of 2016 received advance-care planning talks, according to calculations by health policy analysts at Duke University....

The article explores some explanations for these numbers, including lack of knowledge of the benefit by doctors and lingering concerns over the "death panels" controversy.

August 14, 2017 in Advance Directives/End-of-Life, Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Federal Statutes/Regulations, Health Care/Long Term Care, Medicare | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, August 10, 2017

GAO Report on Federal Low-Income Programs

The GAO has issued a report that examines various federal programs for low-income individuals. Federal Low-Income Programs: Eligibility and Benefits Differ for Selected Programs Due to Complex and Varied Rules  offers the following findings

Six key federally funded programs for low-income people vary significantly with regard to who is eligible, how income is counted and the maximum income applicants may have to be eligible, and the benefits provided. In fiscal year 2015, the most current data available, the federal government spent nearly $540 billion on benefits for these six programs—the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), Medicaid, the Housing Choice Voucher program, Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), Supplemental Security Income (SSI), and Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF). The target population for each of these programs differs, for example, people who are elderly or disabled or who have dependent children. Further, some programs have conditions for continued eligibility, such as participation in work activities under TANF. The six programs also vary in what income is and is not counted when determining an applicant's eligibility. For example, certain programs, such as SNAP, disregard a portion of earned income, while others do not. The maximum amount of income an applicant may have and still be eligible for benefits, which is determined for some programs at the federal level and for others at the state or local level, also differs significantly. As of December 2016, this amount ranged from $5,359 per month for one state's Medicaid program to $0 per month in one state for TANF cash assistance, for a single parent with two children. Benefit levels also differed across the six selected programs, with average monthly benefits for these programs ranging in fiscal year 2015 from $258 for SNAP to $626 for Housing Choice Vouchers, and four of the six programs adjust benefits annually.Legal, administrative, and financial constraints pose challenges to efforts to streamline varying eligibility rules for federal low-income programs, according to GAO's current and previous work. A key challenge is that the programs are authorized by different federal statutes enacted at different times in response to differing circumstances. Other laws, such as appropriations laws, can also have an impact on federal programs and their rules. As a result, streamlining eligibility rules would require changing many laws and coordination among a broad set of lawmakers and congressional committees. A further challenge is that a different federal agency or office administers each program GAO reviewed. For some of these programs, such as TANF, state governments also establish some program rules, making it more difficult to streamline rules at the federal level within or across these programs. Finally, financial constraints may also affect efforts to streamline program rules. For example, if rule changes raise the income eligibility limit in a program, more people may become eligible and that program's costs may increase. Despite these challenges, Congress, federal agencies, and states have taken some steps to streamline program administration and rules, such as by making greater use of data-sharing where permitted by federal law and aligning programs' applications and eligibility determination processes. For example, SSI recipients in most states are automatically eligible for Medicaid, and GAO previously reported that some states have integrated the SNAP eligibility process with other low-income programs, such as through combined applications and common eligibility workers.

The 56 page report is downloadable here as a pdf.  The one page highlights is available here.

August 10, 2017 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Federal Statutes/Regulations, Food and Drink, Housing, Medicaid | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, August 9, 2017

2018 Medicine-Law Continuing Ed Program: Save the Date

The Florida State U. Center for Innovative Collaboration in Medicine & Law  along with the Florida Bioethics Network will hold the annual Medicine-Law Conference on Monday, January 22, 2018 at the Florida State University Alumni Center in Tallahassee.  The 2018 conference theme is Health Professional/Attorney Collaboration on Behalf of Patients and Clients.  More info will be available from the Center for Innovative Collaboration in Medicine & Law.

August 9, 2017 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Health Care/Long Term Care, Programs/CLEs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, August 8, 2017

Senate Passes Elder Abuse Prevention and Prosecution Act

Recently the U.S. Senate passed S 178, the Elder Abuse Prevention and Prosecution Act which is "[t]o prevent elder abuse and exploitation and improve the justice system’s response to victims in elder abuse and exploitation cases."

Title I  is "Supporting Federal Cases Involving Elder Justice", Title II  is "Improved Data Collection & Federal Coordination", Title III covers enhanced services to victims of elder abuse, Title IV, the "Robert Matava Elder Abuse Prosecution Act of 2017", includes enhanced penalities for those email & telemarketing schemes targeting elders, as well as interstate initiaties and state training & technical assistance. 

In Title V, Miscellaneous, there are sections that deal with  GAO reports, "[c]ourt-appointed guardianship oversight activities under the Elder Justice Act...," outreach to both state and local law enforcement and a requirement that the AG "publish model power of attorney legislation for the purpose of preventing elder abuse" (section 504) and "publish best practices for improving guardianship proceedings and model legislation  relating to guardianship proceedings for the purpose of preventing elder abuse."

 

 

August 8, 2017 in Consumer Information, Crimes, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Federal Statutes/Regulations | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, August 7, 2017

New Report on LGBT Elders

MAP (Movement Advancement Project) has released a new report, Understanding Issues Facing LGBT Older Adults. Here is a brief description:

It is estimated that there are approximately 2.7 million LGBT adults aged 50 and older in the United States, 1.1 million of whom are 65 and older. Understanding Issues Facing LGBT Older Adults provides an overview of their unique needs and experiences so that service providers, advocates, the aging network, and policymakers can consider these factors when serving this population or passing laws that impact older adults and the LGBT community

In addition to the 32 page report available for download, you can also access a video, Aging as LGBT: Two Stories and 3 infographics, Lasting Impact of Discrimination, Who are LGBT Elders and Aging as LGBT: Two Stories which is also available in large print for download

August 7, 2017 in Consumer Information, Crimes, Discrimination, Health Care/Long Term Care | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, August 6, 2017

Free Webinar: In-kind Support & Maintenance

Mark your calendars for August 16, 2017 at 2:00 p.m. edt for a free webinar from Justice in Aging on In-Kind Support & Maintenance (ISM).  Here's a description of the webinar:

Why do many clients receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits only receive $490 each month instead of $735, and what can we do about it?  In many cases, the reason is “in-kind support and maintenance” (ISM). A person who receives shelter and food from a friend or family member they live with is receiving in-kind support and maintenance. The Social Security Administration (SSA) counts that support as income and lowers their benefit. The ISM rule is unique to the SSI program, and causes a lot of confusion for recipients, advocates, and SSA. This free webinar, In-Kind Support and Maintenance, will explore the ins and outs of ISM, provide examples of how the rule works, and offer strategies for dealing with the rule. As SSI is a means-tested program, applicants and recipients must meet several financial eligibility criteria on an ongoing basis. The income and resources rules, including “in-kind support and maintenance,” are particularly complicated. These rules can cause significant hardship for low-income people trying to survive on SSI. Giving advocates the tools to successfully navigate the rules on behalf of their clients can make a big difference. The recipient in the example above could have an additional $245 per month for necessities like health care expenses, household expenses, transportation, and other basic needs.

To register for this webinar, click here.

August 6, 2017 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Federal Statutes/Regulations, Programs/CLEs, Social Security, Webinars | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, August 5, 2017

Free Webinar: Bankruptcy & Elders

Justice in Aging is offering a free webinar on Tuesday August 8, 2017 at 2:00 p.m. edt on Bankruptcy Protections for Older Consumers. Here's the description of the webinar:

An increasing number of older consumers are struggling with unmanageable debt. Debt collectors are using aggressive tactics to pursue older adults with limited resources, making it critically important for legal services attorneys to understand protections that may help their clients. Bankruptcy may help older consumers eliminate debt and preserve income needed to pay rent, buy food, and keep the lights on.   This free webinar, Bankruptcy Protections for Older Consumers, outlines the issues facing older consumers and offers strategies to address the challenges. This session will highlight the various protections available and alternatives to filing for bankruptcy.

Click here to register for this webinar.

August 5, 2017 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Federal Statutes/Regulations, Programs/CLEs, Webinars | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, August 4, 2017

The New Uniform Guardianship Act

The Uniform Law Commissioners recently approved the new guardianship act. The prior act, the Uniform Guardianship & Protective Proceedings Act was approved in 1997. The new act, the Uniform Guardian, Conservatorship & Other Protective Arrangements Act was approved in mid-July at the ULC's 126th annual meeting.  Terminology has changed with this new act, with the use of incapacitated person falling by the wayside. Instead, the act refers to "adult subject to guardianship" or adult subject to conservatorship" both of which are defined in Section 102. Less restrictive alternative now includes supported decision-making, along with other alternatives such as a health care or financial power of attorney or representative payee.  More emphasis is put on protective arrangements (Article 5 of the Act) as an alternative to guardianship. Another version of the new act with a prefatory note and commentary will be available on the ULC website soon.

August 4, 2017 in Cognitive Impairment, Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, State Statutes/Regulations | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, July 28, 2017

FDA and the Right to Try

The GAO has issued a new report regarding the FDA's right to try approach to experimental drugs. Investigational New Drugs: FDA Has Taken Steps to Improve the Expanded Access Program but Should Further Clarify How Adverse Events Data Are Used reviews the FDA's increased access to experimental drugs.  Here's the findings from the report:

Under the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) expanded access program, patients with serious or life threatening ailments and no other comparable medical options can obtain access to investigational drugs outside of a clinical trial. Expanded access requests must be submitted to FDA but manufacturers must also grant permission for patients to access their investigational drugs. Of the nearly 5,800 expanded access requests that were submitted to FDA from fiscal year 2012 through 2015, FDA allowed 99 percent to proceed. Almost 96 percent of these requests were for single patients (either emergency or non-emergency). FDA’s review process for expanded access requests is designed such that all requests are either allowed or not allowed to proceed within 30 days of receiving each request. FDA typically responded to emergency single-patient requests within hours and other types of requests within the allotted 30 days.

FDA and other stakeholders, including a non-profit organization and a drug manufacturer, have taken steps to improve the expanded access process and patient access to drugs...  Some states have also enacted "Right-to-Try" laws to facilitate patient access to investigational drugs. These laws provide liability and licensing protections for manufacturers and providers under state law if an adverse event—such as an adverse reaction to the drug—occurs with patients who were allowed access to investigational drugs. However, some stakeholders GAO interviewed cited concerns that these laws may not help patients access drugs, in part because they do not compel a manufacturer to provide access.

Manufacturers sponsoring clinical trials must submit safety reports to FDA that include adverse events data resulting from clinical trials and any expanded access use, to be used in assessing the safety of a drug within the drug approval process... Further, some of the manufacturers told GAO the guidance was unclear. These manufacturers noted that the lack of clear information can influence their decision whether to give patients access to their drugs because of their concerns that an adverse event will result in FDA placing a clinical hold on their drug, which could delay its development. This could impact FDA’s goal of facilitating expanded access to drugs for treatment use by patients with serious or life-threatening diseases or conditions, when appropriate.

 

 

 

 

July 28, 2017 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Federal Statutes/Regulations, Health Care/Long Term Care | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, July 27, 2017

Distributive Justice and Donative Intent

Professor Alexander Boni-Saenz at Chicago-Kent College of Law has an interesting new article, Distributive Justice and Donative Intent, forthcoming in the UCLA Law Review.  From the abstract:

The inheritance system is beset by formalism. Probate courts reject wills on technicalities and refuse to correct obvious drafting mistakes by testators. These doctrines lead to donative errors, or outcomes that are not in line with the decedent’s donative intent. While scholars and reformers have critiqued the intent-defeating effects of formalism in the past, none have examined the resulting distribution of donative errors and connected it to broader social and economic inequalities. Drawing on egalitarian theories of distributive justice, this Article develops a novel critique of formalism in the inheritance law context. The central normative claim is that formalistic wills doctrines should be reformed because they create unjustified inequalities in the distribution of donative errors. In other words, probate formalism harms those who attempt to engage in estate planning without specialized legal knowledge or the economic resources to hire an attorney. By highlighting these distributive concerns, this Article reorients inheritance law scholarship to the needs of the middle class and crystallizes distributive arguments for reformers of the probate system.

When I teach Wills, Trusts & Estates, I always include a few of the latest news articles or case reports that focus on LegalZoom or other, less high-profile on-line document drafting venues that are used directly by consumers.  Alex's article examines the implications of formalism for this important reality.  Thanks, Alex!

July 27, 2017 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Estates and Trusts, Ethical Issues, Property Management, State Cases, State Statutes/Regulations | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, July 26, 2017

Dementia Prospects Down?

Good news for all of us!  The July 2017 issue of Today's Research on Aging from the Population Reference Bureau reports a proportional decline in dementia. Dementia Trends: Implications for an Aging America explains that

While the absolute number of older Americans with dementia is increasing, the proportion of the population with dementia may have fallen over the past 25 years, according to a recent U.S. study (Langa et al. 2017). Researchers say this downward trend may be the result of better brain health—possibly related to higher levels of education and more aggressive treatment of cardiovascular risk factors such as high blood pressure and diabetes.

After discussing the research, the research report also notes this

The decline in dementia prevalence coupled with longer life expectancy may be contributing to another change: A growing share of older Americans are spending less of their lifetimes with cognitive impairments, another recent study based on HRS data and vital statistics shows (Crimmins, Saito, and Kim 2016). The gains in life expectancy between 2000 and 2010 represent more time older Americans spend cognitively intact, the researchers report. The share of Americans 65 and older without cognitive problems increased by 4.5 percentage points for men and 3.4 percentage points for women during the decade. At the same time, the average time older people spent with dementia or cognitive impairment shortened slightly.

The report discusses the various theories and work done to help  with "brain training", the correlations (if any) between certain diseases and dementia, and policy and budgetary implications. The report concludes:

Improvements in understanding, diagnosing, preventing, and treating Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias are top NIA priorities. The 2011 National Alzheimer’s Project Act and related legislation lay the foundation and provide new funding for “an aggressive and coordinated national plan to accelerate research.” This initiative includes research designed to better answer the following questions:

•What roles do education and intellectual stimulation play in delaying or preventing dementia?

•What are the connections among dementia, cardiovascular disease, obesity, and diabetes?

•What are the best ways to reduce the dementia risks that minority group members face?

Refining our understanding of the answers to these questions can enable policymakers and

planners to design and test prevention strategies that can contribute to continued future decline

in dementia prevalence.

 

July 26, 2017 in Cognitive Impairment, Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Health Care/Long Term Care, Science, Statistics | Permalink | Comments (0)

Intervention as Mitigation of Elder Mistreatment?

The National Adult Protective Services Association (NAPSA) and the National Council on Crime and Delinquency announce a free upcoming webinar, The Abuse Intervention Model: A Pragmatic Approach to Intervention for Elder Mistreatment. Set for August 9, 2017 at 2 p.m. edt, the "webinar will present the Abuse Intervention Model (AIM), which is a simple, coherent framework of known risk factors of the victim, perpetrator, and environment that applies to all types of abuse. Dr. Laura Mosqueda will discuss the details of the AIM, and present case studies on how the AIM can be applied to APS work."  Click here to register.  To read more about the intervention model, click here.

July 26, 2017 in Consumer Information, Crimes, Current Affairs, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Programs/CLEs, Webinars | Permalink | Comments (0)