Friday, May 18, 2018

Doctors Discussing Gun Safety With Elder Patients

Kaiser Health News published a compilation of recent stories about gun safety and one caught my eye: the advantage of doctors discussing gun safety with elder patients. Doctors Should Be Discussing Gun Safety With Aging Patients, Researchers Say.

The reference to the story  from the LA TImes, As more older Americans struggle with dementia, what happens to their guns?seemed particularly on point and the KHN story published the opening from the LA Times article

The man had been a patient for decades, retired now from a career in which firearms were a part of the job. He was enjoying his days hunting, or at the shooting range with friends. But episodes of confusion had led to a suspicion of dementia, and the nights were the worst: At sundown, he became disoriented, anxious and a little paranoid, and had started sleeping with his loaded pistol under the pillow. One night, he pointed it at his wife as she returned from the bathroom. It wasn't clear whether he recognized her, but he was certainly confused — and she was terrified. Thankfully, the incident did not end in disaster.

Regardless of your position on the gun control debate, consider these statistics from the LA Times article

Roughly 1 in 3 adults over 65 in the United States is thought to own a gun. An additional 12% live in a household with someone who does.

As seniors turn 70, their odds of developing Alzheimer's disease in a given year jump from less than 1% (among those 65 to 69) to 2.5% (among those 70 to 74), and keep rising from there. By 2050, the number of older Americans with Alzheimer's is expected to reach 13.8 million.

The article discusses driver safety and draws corollaries to gun safety. The article highlights the lack of response to this issue at the state level:

No federal laws prohibit the purchase or possession of firearms by a person with dementia. Only two states, Hawaii and Texas, explicitly mention dementia or similar conditions in their firearms statutes.

In Hawaii, any person under treatment for "organic brain syndromes" is prohibited from owning a gun. Texas law makes individuals diagnosed with "chronic dementia" ineligible for a license to carry a handgun in public. But it does not limit such a person's right to purchase or possess firearms.

One expert quoted in the article describes this as not an issue of taking away someone's guns but instead a decision that focuses on the person's safety.

May 18, 2018 in Cognitive Impairment, Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Health Care/Long Term Care, Other, State Cases, State Statutes/Regulations, Statistics | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, May 17, 2018

When I'm 64...Will I Be Relevant?

We all can sing along to that fabulous Beatles song, When I'm 64. Perhaps the Beatles were prescient, as now Kaiser Health News has published an article about remaining relevant in your life when you are 64 and beyond.... Will We Still Be Relevant ‘When We’re 64’? opens with this description

A gnawing sense of irrelevancy and invisibility suddenly hits many aging adults, as their life roles shift from hands-on parent to empty nester or from workaholic to retiree. Self-worth and identity may suffer as that feeling that you matter starts to fade. Older adults see it in the workplace when younger colleagues seem uninterested in their feedback. Those who just retired might feel a bit unproductive.

The article then segues into a discussion of various recent studies that bears out this fear of becoming irrelevant. Whether it's being important at work or important in your personal life, there is a value to being relevant, or even being needed, even if it's just giving advice to a younger person. "Having purpose and meaning forestalls loneliness, which takes an emotional and physical toll. Studies by ... researchers have found that loneliness is associated with weaker immune systems and poorer physical health."

One group in Austin, Texas (the slogan, "Keep Austin Weird")  took initiative by "finding their purpose with a community created by Aging is Cool, an active-aging company founded just over a year ago." The article discusses this community initiative as well as some other ones across the country, volunteering and continued employment. The article closes with an example for all of us: "96-year-old actress Betty White ... [who] still produces good work and she has a great amount of energy... Her entire package promotes a youthful and optimistic attitude.”

May 17, 2018 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Health Care/Long Term Care, Other, Science | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, May 16, 2018

Grandparent Rights and Responsibilities -- and New Laws

Last Sunday, CBS' 60 Minutes ran an extended feature story on the role of grandparents as primary caregivers for grandchildren, often because of untrustworthy parents with opioid or other addiction problems.  The story reported that "stoked by the opioid crisis, 21,000 children -- just in Utah -- live with their grandparents."

The feature also suggested some of the financial consequences for the extended family, as grandparents were exhausting their own retirement savings in order to provide for the younger children.  Nonprofit programs, such as Grandfamilies, sometimes are able to provide informal support for the grandparents.  

Along the same lines, Pennsylvania's Governor Wolf signed new laws, Senate Bill 844 (Printer's No. 1531), which became Act No. 21, on May 4, 2018.  The law recognizes expanded standing for grandparents to seek physical or legal custody for grandchildren, if they can show "clear and convincing evidence" of all of the following: 

(I) The individual has assumed or is willing to assume responsibility for the child. 


(II) The individual has a sustained, substantial and sincere interest in the welfare of the child.

 

In determining whether the individual meets the requirements of this subparagh, the court may consider, among other factors, the nature, quality, extent and length of the involvement by the individual in the child's life.

 

(III) Neither parent has any form of care or control of the child.

Pennsylvania estimates that there are 82,000 grandparents acting as sole caregivers for roughly 89,000 grandchildren.  Other related bills still pending in Pennsylvania include support for creation of a "Kinship Caregiver Navigation Program," and a means to appoint a temporary guardian when a parent enters drug or alcohol treatment.     

Additional history on the shifts in thinking on grandparent rights can be important.  For example see this Pennsylvania law firm's blog post from 2013 on amendments that removed "automatic" standing for grandparents to seek custody.     

The Pennsylvania Bar Institute, responding swiftly to the latest changes, is offering a Webinar  tomorrow (May 17, 2018) on the new laws.   

May 16, 2018 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Ethical Issues, Programs/CLEs, State Statutes/Regulations, Statistics | Permalink | Comments (0)

National Senior Fraud Awareness Day

Yesterday, May 15, 2018, was designated by the U.S. Senate as "National Senior Fraud Awareness Day." The reason for the day, according to the Congressional Record is "To Raise Awareness About the Increasing Number of Fraudulent Schemes Targeted At Older People of The United States, To Encourage The Implementation of Policies to Prevent These Scams From Happening, and to Improve Protections From These Scams For Seniors."

Senator Collins for herself and 4 other Senators, and introduced the resolution, S. Res. 506.

Here it is in its entirety:

Whereas, in 2017, there were more than 47,800,000 individuals age 65 or older in the United States (referred to  in this preamble as ``seniors''), and seniors accounted for  14.9 percent of the total population of the United States;

Whereas senior fraud is a growing concern as millions of older people of the United States are targeted by scams each year, including the Internal Revenue Service impersonation scams, sweepstakes and lottery scams, grandparent scams, computer tech support scams, romance scams, work-at-home scams, charity scams, home improvement scams, fraudulent investment schemes, and identity theft; Whereas other types of fraud perpetrated against seniors include health care fraud, health insurance fraud,  counterfeit prescription drug fraud, funeral and cemetery  fraud, ``anti-aging'' product fraud, telemarketing fraud, and internet fraud;
Whereas the Government Accountability Office has estimated that seniors lose a staggering $2,900,000,000 each year to an ever-growing array of financial exploitation schemes and scams;
Whereas, since 2013, the fraud hotline of the Special Committee on Aging of the Senate has received more than 7,200 complaints reporting possible scams from individuals in all 50 States, the District of Columbia, and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico;
Whereas the ease with which criminals contact seniors through the internet and telephone increases as more creative schemes emerge;
Whereas, according to the Consumer Sentinel Network Data Book 2017, released by the Federal Trade Commission, people age 60 years and older were defrauded of $249,000,000 in 2017, with the median loss to defrauded victims age 80 and older averaging $1,092 per person, more than double the average amount lost by those victims between the ages 50 and 59 years old;
Whereas senior fraud is underreported by victims due to embarrassment and lack of information about where to report fraud; and
Whereas May 15, 2018, is an appropriate day to establish as ``National Senior Fraud Awareness Day'': Now, therefore, be it
Resolved, That the Senate--
(1) supports the designation of May 15, 2018, as ``National Senior Fraud Awareness Day'';
(2) recognizes ``National Senior Fraud Awareness Day'' as  an opportunity to raise awareness about the barrage of scams  that individuals age 65 or older in the United States  (referred to in this resolving clause as ``seniors'') face in person, by mail, on the phone, and online;
(3) recognizes that law enforcement, consumer protection groups, area agencies on aging, and financial institutions all play vital roles in preventing scams targeting seniors and educating seniors about those scams;
(4) encourages implementation of policies to prevent these scams and to improve measures to protect seniors from scams targeting seniors; and
(5) honors the commitment and dedication of the individuals and organizations who work tirelessly to fight against scams targeting seniors.

  

 

May 16, 2018 in Consumer Information, Crimes, Current Affairs, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Federal Cases, Federal Statutes/Regulations, Other, State Cases, State Statutes/Regulations | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, May 15, 2018

"Living Apart, Together"

Kaiser Health News ran an interesting story about couples, committed to each other, but living apart, noting that experts have named this as "living apart together." Living Apart Together: A New Option for Older Adults explains about older couples who are seriously committed to each other, spend a lot of time together, including romantic time, but do not live together.  This is described as “a new, emerging form of family, especially among older adults, that’s on the rise,” said Laura Funk, an associate professor of sociology at the University of Manitoba in Canada who’s written about living apart together."  There are several studies examining the frequency, scope and effect of these types of relationships (shortened to LATs).  A number of reasons are given as to why these couples choose to not live together but wanted a companion, including those who seek “intimate companionship” while maintaining their own homes, social circles, customary activities and finances ...." As well, those who had been caregivers, or had a bad marriage or a marriage ending in divorce seem to prefer to not live together. The article offers some fascinating anecdotes.

 

May 15, 2018 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Housing, Other | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, May 14, 2018

Which States Mandate Certification or Licensure of Guardians?

As I have written in a recent post, Maryland has adopted mandatory training for guardians, effective January 1, 2018.  The Administrative Office for the Maryland Courts is rapidly developing educational materials, including an orientation and topic-specific videos.  In-person training programs are also under development, on a county-by-county basis. 

I recently had a great conversation with Attorney Nisa Subasinghe at the AOMC and I was impressed by all her office is accomplishing in a relatively short time, with a pro-active approach to the topic of court-appointed guardians and the use of orientation videos to get the process rolling.  

Nisa also provided links to the new Maryland Rules on mandatory training for guardians:  Md. Rules 10-108, 10.205.1, and 10-304.1.  In addition, these rules refer to  Guidelines for Court-Appointed Guardians of the Person and Property.  Thank you, Nisa! 

The state of Washington also is developing a program for "lay/family (non-professional) guardians training."  

County-by-county training can be a real problem, as I'm realizing in Pennsylvania where we have 67 counties and probably almost that many views on the need for (or best approach to) oversight of guardians.  

Other states have also been active in establishing education and testing for prospective or current guardians.  Several states' programs have been developed following allegations of improper appointments or lack of oversight.  We've highlighted some of these states in recent Elder Law Prof Blog posts, including Arizona, New Mexico, Nevada and Florida.   

A key decision point is whether to mandate certification or licensure only for so-called professional guardians or also for individuals serving as a guardian for a family member or friend, sometimes  described in legislation or court rules as "nonprofessional guardians."   Driven by complaints by family members about perceived high costs, mistakes, or abuse by fee-paid guardians, some states have focused only on professionals, perhaps on the theory they are affecting larger numbers of alleged incapacitated persons.  Other states, such as Maryland, have taken the position that a minimum threshold of education and oversight is appropriate for all persons serving in guardian or conservator roles, including family members. 

The Center for Guardianship Certification (CGC) offers a map showing certain states with mandatory guardianship programs or rules.  As depicted on the map, some states have adopted  CGC certifications as the state standard for approval of "professional" guardians.  In addition, I noticed that CGC has a list (by exam numbers) of the recent results -- pass or fail -- of certification exams conducted by CGC.   

The ABA also has an online chart (March 2018), prepared by attorney Sally Hurme for the ABA Commission on Law and Aging, with additional information about state certification or licensing rules for guardians. 

You can tell there is a lot of movement in this area -- understandably so given reports across the country. As I was preparing this post, I noticed that neither of these two state charts had identified Maryland as one of the mandatory training states and I suspect I'm missing a few more states that have certification programs in the works.  

May 14, 2018 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Estates and Trusts, Ethical Issues, Property Management, State Cases, State Statutes/Regulations, Statistics | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, May 13, 2018

New Article: Primer on Disability Law for Land Use & Zoning

The intersection of land use and zoning laws and regs with a person's ability to live at home is so important. I wanted to let you know about a new article on the topic: A Primer on Disability for Land Use and Zoning Law  posted recently on SSRN.  The article is published in Volume 4 of  the Journal of Law, Property, and Society at 1 (March 2018). Here is the abstract

Approximately 20-30 percent of American families have a family member with a disability, many with a mobility impairment. Many people need access to disability services and programs. They need the availability of group homes, senior housing, drug rehabilitation centers, medical marijuana dispensaries, and counseling clinics. This leads to land use disputes.

This Primer is designed for people familiar with property law and land regulation (planning and zoning), and with little experience with disability law. The goal is to present an introduction that facilitates understanding of the intersections between land use law and disability. In general, the legal requirements of primary concern are limited, such that only a few parts of our expansive disability law are most relevant to the vast majority of planning and zoning matters. This Primer will guide the reader through these key provisions. The Acts discussed in this Primer include the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), the Rehabilitation Act (RHA), and the Fair Housing Act (FHA).

The 45 page article is available for download as a pdf from the Journal's website, here.

May 13, 2018 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Federal Statutes/Regulations, Housing, Other, State Statutes/Regulations | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, May 10, 2018

David Goodall Has Ended His Life

Earlier in the week we'd blogged about Australian David Goodall who, at 104, had decided he'd lived more than long enough and traveled to Switzerland to end his life.  The New York Times, among other news outlets, reported that he has done so. A Song Before Dying: David Goodall, 104, Australian Scientist, Ends His Life in Switzerland reports that "[o]n Thursday, Mr. Goodall died about 12.30 p.m. local time, according to Exit International, a right-to-die organization of which he had been a longtime member."  His decision has caught a lot of media attention, and the article relates that he held a final press conference the day before his death.

He was crystal clear about why he had chosen “the Swiss option.” Euthanasia and assisted dying are banned in Australia, though Victoria State has passed a law on assisted dying that goes into effect next year; it will apply only to terminally ill patients who have a life expectancy of no more than six months... He said he hoped his life story would “increase the pressure” on Australia to change its laws. “One wants to be free to choose his death when death is at the appropriate time,” Mr. Goodall said.

Mr. Goodall wanted no events marking his death. The article concludes that when he was asked "[h]ow would he like to be remembered? “As an instrument of freeing the elderly from the need to pursue their life irrespective,” he said at the news conference on Wednesday. .. At one point, he was asked what tune he would choose for his last song, and he said the final movement of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony. Then he began to sing, with verve and vigor... According to Mr. Nitschke, Mr. Goodall did end up choosing Beethoven, and he died the moment “Ode to Joy” concluded."

 

*updated to correct location

May 10, 2018 in Advance Directives/End-of-Life, Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Health Care/Long Term Care, International, Other | Permalink | Comments (0)

Why Can't Medicare Beneficiaries use Drug Discount Coupons?

Because Medicare says so, that's why. Actually that's a bit of a glib answer. Instead, as Kaiser Health News explains it in the article, Medicare Beneficiaries Feel The Pinch When They Can’t Use Drug Coupons it's about impartiality.

Under the federal anti-kickback law, it’s illegal for drug manufacturers to offer people any type of payment that might persuade them to purchase something that federal health care programs like Medicare and Medicaid might pay for. The coupons can lead to unnecessary Medicare spending by inducing beneficiaries to choose drugs that are expensive.

“The law was intended to prevent fraud, but in this case it also has the effect of prohibiting Part D enrollees from using manufacturer copay coupons … because using the coupon would be steering Medicare’s business toward a particular entity,” said Juliette Cubanski, associate director of the Program on Medicare Policy at the Kaiser Family Foundation.

The story digs down deeper into the issue regarding coupons and discusses the ramifications of such use, including higher costs, dismissal of less-expensive alternatives and annual ceililngs on the cards.

Now we know.

May 10, 2018 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Federal Statutes/Regulations, Health Care/Long Term Care, Medicare | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, May 9, 2018

Do You Know the Difference Between Fraud & Financial Abuse?

Check out this new issue brief from the National Adult Protective Services Association (NAPSA) Research to Practice SeriesFraud versus financial abuse and the influence of social relationship, offers this summary

Elder financial exploitation, committed by individuals in positions of trust, and elder fraud, committed by predatory strangers, are two forms of financial victimization that target vulnerable older adults. The study presented in the webinar analyzes differences between fraud and financial exploitation APS victims in terms of their health, functional dependency, cognitive functioning, and social relationships.

In this mixed methods study, fifty-three financial exploitation and fraud cases were sampled from an elder abuse forensic center in California. Data include law enforcement and caseworker investigation reports, victim medical records, perpetrator demographic information, and forensic assessments of victim health and cognitive functioning.

The vast majority of fraud and financial exploitation victims performed poorly on tests of cognitive functioning and financial decision-making administered by a forensic neuropsychologist following the allegations. Based on retrospective record review, there were few significant differences in physical health and cognitive functioning at the time victims' assets were taken, although their social contexts were different. Fraud most often occurred when a vulnerable elder was solicited by a financial predator

in the absence of capable guardians. In other words, most fraud victims in the sample did not have trusted friends or family members assisting with financial decisions and providing care at the time the fraud perpetrators entered the picture. Fraud victims were significantly less likely to have children and also had fewer relatives nearby. In sum, fraud and financial exploitation victims had different family and friend structures that may create different opportunity structures for crime.

Social isolation was not only a potential risk factor for financial victimization, it was also a tactic of undue influence to further manipulate and control the victims. Some fraud victims in the sample developed close friendships and romantic relationships with the financial perpetrators, even in the cases where they communicated only by telephone. While these relationships were constructed to manipulate and deceive the victim, they felt authentic to the older person. Perpetrators often exploited the victim's need for companionship and began limiting and controlling their victims' social interactions to create a sense of powerlessness and emotional dependency.

May 9, 2018 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Other, Statistics | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, May 8, 2018

Being "too old" as the basis for seeking Aid-in-Dying?

Last week the Washington Post ran an article about Australian David Goodall. This Australian scientist just turned 104. Now he’s flying to Switzerland to die explains that Goodall thinks he has lived too long. "When asked whether he had a nice birthday, he told the news organization: 'No, I’m not happy. I want to die. ... It’s not sad, particularly. What is sad is if one is prevented. My feeling is that an old person like myself should have full citizenship rights, including the right of assisted suicide,' the 104-year-old man added." In the article he expressed regret that he had to leave his home country to travel to another where aid-in-dying is available. The article reviews the laws in various European countries as well as the states in the U.S. that have legalized medical aid-in-dying.

Goodall has been active for many years as an "honorary research assistant", but his long career has had some blips. The article reports that in 2016 "the school ... deemed him unfit to continue making the trek to campus.... after nearly two decades on the campus, Goodall was told to leave amid concerns about his well-being. The incident gained international media attention, with Goodall, then 102, calling it ageism in the workplace.... University officials later reversed their decision."

His goal is to die on May 10.  According to CNN earlier today, he has checked into a clinic in Switzerland.

May 8, 2018 in Advance Directives/End-of-Life, Consumer Information, Health Care/Long Term Care | Permalink | Comments (0)

Do You Have Enough Retirement Savings? -- Here's An Encouraging Report

Most commentaries on funding for retirement years point to insufficiency of savings or other resources.  But here's a different take, drawing upon a recently published report from the Employee Benefit Research Institute (EBRI) that suggests retirees with significant savings are often exercising restraint in spending,  From the St. Louis Post-Dispatch on The Myth of Outliving Your Retirement Savings:

In the EBRI study, those with the most savings — a median of $857,450 shortly after retiring — still had $756,300 two decades later. The decrease amounts to just 11.8 percent of the original sum.

 

The largest drop in retirement nest eggs, 24.4 percent, was among those with the least savings, or a median of $29,975.

 

Frugal behavior is consistent with research led by Anna Rappaport for the Society of Actuaries. She and her team found that most people do not plan for retirement or know what they should spend, but they adapt — even when shocked by high dental bills or a roof repair.

 

What can devastate financially are divorce, caring for a mentally or physically ill adult child who cannot work, and long-term care expenses, according to the actuarial society’s research.

 

Still, debilitating health care costs are far more rare than people fear, according to the EBRI research. Half of retirees face no nursing home expenses because Medicare covers short recoveries after hospital stays and Medicaid can help when resources run out.

 

The medical annual out-of-pocket spending for 90 percent of retirees is just $2,000, and the big nursing home costs over $87,000 hit only 10 percent of people living longer than 95, according to the EBRI study.

For the EBRI study itself, see the April 2018 report on Asset Decumulation or Asset Preservation?  What Guides Retirement Spending? 

May 8, 2018 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Estates and Trusts, Ethical Issues, Health Care/Long Term Care, Medicaid, Medicare, Retirement, Statistics | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, May 7, 2018

Wisconsin Study Reports 20% of Long-Term Care Jobs Are Unfilled

From Wisconsin Public Radio on the Long-Term Care Workforce Crisis Report of 2018:  

A coalition of Wisconsin health care organizations is warning that the state's shortage of long-term care providers continues to grow.

 

The study, put together by several groups across the state, says 1 in 5 direct caregiver positions in the state is going unfilled. That's up from 1 in 7 positions in 2016.

 

Starting wages in the profession are so low that many potential workers never apply, according to the report. The median hourly starting wage for personal caregivers is $10.75 an hour, according to the study, while other positions outside health care start at $12 an hour.

 

The report found Wisconsin's low rate of Medicaid reimbursement is a key factor keeping provider wages low.

 

Sarah Bass of the Wisconsin Assisted Living Association said with so many unfilled positions, many facilities are cutting back, even though demand for long-term care continues to grow.

 

"Assisted living providers are closing their doors, or shutting down areas of their assisted living facilities, because they don't have the staff to safely take care of the residents," she said. "They're reducing their admissions."

These problems exist despite some increases in state funding for skilled care and family care workers in the latest budget.  

May 7, 2018 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Ethical Issues, Federal Statutes/Regulations, Health Care/Long Term Care, Medicaid, State Statutes/Regulations, Statistics | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, May 6, 2018

Maryland Offers On-Line Orientation Video for Prospective Court-Appointed Guardians

As is true for many states, Maryland is increasing the education, support and supervision for guardians appointed by the Maryland courts.  In connection with this, beginning on January 1, 2018, prospective guardians must watch a video-based  "orientation program" before they are appointed guardian of a minor or disabled person.  The 9-minute video introduces the "roles, duties and responsibilities" of a guardian and explains mch of what to expect if appointed by the Maryland Courts.   Here is a link to the video.  

What I particularly like about this video is the message "You Are Not Alone as a Guardian," and the emphasis that Court-appointed guardians are subject to the ultimate authority of the Court.  I think that many courts are still struggling with their  own roles in this regard, but here the lines of responsibility are explained clearly.

The balance here is delicate, requiring careful thought about how to provide threshold information essential for a candidate to make an informed decision about whether to serve, but  without making the information so overwhelming that good candidates decline the role.  The Maryland courts caution that this particular orientation and the related training requirements do NOT apply to public guardians or guardianships that terminate parental rights. 

In my opinion, this type of video is a good first step.  But just a first step.  

May 6, 2018 in Cognitive Impairment, Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Estates and Trusts, Ethical Issues, Legal Practice/Practice Management, Programs/CLEs, Property Management, State Cases, State Statutes/Regulations, Webinars | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, May 4, 2018

The Continuing "Problem" of Wheelchairs and Walkers in CCRCs and Assisted Living

Recently I was asked the question whether a CCRC could bar new residents from moving into independent living units, if they were using wheelchairs or walkers.  The question perplexes me, not just because of the legal implications under the Fair Housing Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act, and other federal laws, but because I do understand what was motivating the question, at least in part. It was a concern about "sustainability" of the community living model, and the need to attract younger, healthier residents. In a sense, it was an argument that "I don't mind, but others might."  

Paula Span, longtime columnist for the New York Times takes this issue to another venue  -- "assisted living" -- where some operators are attempting to ban those who use wheelchair, even temporarily.  The cited reason is that "we cannot accomodate a wheel-chair bound patient." She captures the dilemma well in her title, "Wheelchairs Prohibited In the Last Place You'd Expect."

Ultimately, I think we all need to be more comfortable with the fact that we do grow old and we do sometimes need assistance.  But, I understand, this is tough to accept.  

 

 

May 4, 2018 in Consumer Information, Discrimination, Ethical Issues, Federal Statutes/Regulations | Permalink | Comments (1)

Thursday, May 3, 2018

21st Annual Elder Law Institute in Pennsylvania, July 19-20, 2018, Open for Registration

Hard to believe, but this summer will mark the 21st annual Elder Law Institute in Pennsylvania  It functions as both a gathering of the clan and an educational update, and I always walk away with new ideas for my own research and writing.  On the second day of the event (which runs July 19 and 20), Howard Gleckman will give the keynote address on "Long Term Care in an Age of Disruption."  Doesn't that title capture the mood of the country?!  

Practical workshops include:

  • Using Irrevocable Trusts in Pre-Crisis and Crisis Planning - Ms. Alvear & Ms. Sikov Gross
  • Guardianship for Someone Who Is 30/30 on the MMSE (Advanced Mental Health Capacity Issues) - Ms. Hee & Mr. Pfeffer
  • Medicaid across State Lines: Pennsylvania vs. New Jersey - Mr. Adler
  • Medicaid Annuities in Practice - Mr. Morgan & Mr. Parker
  • Business Succession Planning for Elder Law Practices - Ms. Ellis, Mr. Marshall, Mr. Pappas & Ms. Wolfe
  • Social Security Disability: What Elder Law Practitioners Need to Know - Mr. Whitelaw
  • Drafting Trusts for Beneficiaries with Behavioral Impairments and Mental Health Problems - Mr. Hagan & Dr. Panzer
  • Being a Road Warrior Attorney: Staying Organized and in Touch While Out of the Office (ETHICS) - Ms. Ellis

Mark your calendars and join us (Linda Anderson, Kimber Latsha and I are hosting a session on Day 1 about "new" CCRC issues).  Registration is here.  

May 3, 2018 in Books, Cognitive Impairment, Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Estates and Trusts, Ethical Issues, Health Care/Long Term Care, Housing, Legal Practice/Practice Management, Medicaid, Medicare, Programs/CLEs, State Cases, State Statutes/Regulations | Permalink | Comments (0)

Contrasting Views on "Peace of Mind" in Community Care Settings

Frequent reader Karen Miller from Florida made a timely catch by sending me two articles that both mention the "peace of mind" that can accompany living in purpose-planned retirement communities, including CCRCs or LPCs.  Thanks, Karen!  

In last Sunday's edition of the New York Times, reporter Peter Finch offered "How to Talk About Moving to a Retirement Home: It's a Journey." He includes admissions by once highly reluctant residents, including one who finally gave in to his wife's desire for a new setting:  

For the once-skeptical Mr. Strumsky, it took only days for him to start feeling certain that he and his wife, who is 72, had made the right decision. About a week after moving in at Charlestown [a retirement community outside of Baltimore], he went out to walk the dog at night and ran into a pair of women he didn’t know who were chatting amiably in the parking lot. About 25 minutes later, he returned home and saw the same women, still talking.

 

“They were so unconcerned about their personal safety, they were oblivious to anything going on around them,” Mr. Strumsky said. “And it just hit me: I really wished my mother or my sister or my aunt could have had this experience, to feel that safe and secure. At that point, it was like a light bulb going on. It was an instant turnaround for me.”

By contrast, Patricia Hunt, a columnist for the News Leader (part of the USA Today Network), writes about "friends whining about the rules of their . . . subdivision," noting that the security that some people seek can come with a regulatory price tag, even if the regulator isn't the government.  She writes in part:

In retirement many people with the means to do so choose a “continuing care retirement community.” There is a big price range, but basically you pay an entrance fee, and most require that you be well enough to live independently to be admitted. They provide food service, activities, and stepped up sections for “assisted living” and for the most debilitated, “skilled nursing care.” This is the most expensive option for one’s last years.

 

But the rules for the residents of CCRCs are set entirely by people who do not live in them. And flexibility is the most restricted of all options. If you grandson who ran away to join the circus can be talked into living with you for a few months until he can sort things out with his parents, you cannot let him do that. If you decline in health and your granddaughter is willing to come live with you so you don’t to go to assisted living or skilled nursing care, you can’t do that either. You can hire people to come in night and day, but your family member cannot simply move in. She must have another permanent address. At least this is how most of them work.

 

If you[r] adult child gets sick or loses a job and needs to stay with you, it is not allowed. And you may not have the money to help him or her out if you have spent it all on the entrance fee and monthly fees.

Hunt concludes by questioning whether people "really" do hate regulation, noting "there is plenty of evidence of that some of them are not only willing to live with more regulations than many other people, they are willing to pay a lot of money to do so." 

For more from Hunt, read the full column "We Hate Regulation, But We Willingly  Trade Away Our Basic Freedoms for Comfort, Security."  

May 3, 2018 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Estates and Trusts, Ethical Issues, Health Care/Long Term Care, Housing, Property Management, Retirement, State Statutes/Regulations | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, May 2, 2018

Wednesday's Child: Lawsuit Filed Against NH Over Mother's Death From Scabies Infection

I'm often hesitant to post photos or videos from allegations about nursing home neglect.  As an outsider, it can be hard to know the full facts.  However, I think that one story about litigation that follows the 2015 death of a 95 year-old woman (reportedly a resident in a Georgia nursing home for some 4 years) from alleged complications associated with scabies, raises important questions from several perspectives.  The questions include the roles of companies and individuals, including family members and caregivers, and about the state in its regulatory role.

Scabies, by the way, is a parasitic infection.  Some of the news articles include copies of  court pleadings.  The facility denies all allegations of fault. Here is a television news clip that presents several key questions.  Plus a word of caution, as the clip includes graphic details:   

 

May 2, 2018 in Cognitive Impairment, Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Ethical Issues, Health Care/Long Term Care, State Cases, State Statutes/Regulations | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, May 1, 2018

Change Proposed re: Medicare Payment to Nursing Homes

Have you checked out the unpublished proposed rule from CMS (scheduled to be published on May 8, 2018)? The lengthy proposal, available here as a pdf, provides this summary

This proposed rule would update the payment rates used under the prospective payment system (PPS) for skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) for fiscal year (FY) 2019. This proposed rule also proposes to replace the existing case-mix classification methodology, the Resource Utilization Groups, Version IV (RUG-IV) model, with a revised case-mix methodology called the Patient-Driven Payment Model (PDPM) effective October 1, 2019. It also proposes revisions to the regulation text that describes a beneficiary’s SNF “resident” status under the consolidated billing provision and the required content of the SNF level of care certification. The proposed rule also includes proposals for the SNF Quality Reporting Program (QRP) and the Skilled Nursing Facility Value-Based Purchasing (VBP) Program that will affect Medicare payment to SNFs.

There's a provision for exceptions for SNFs when a disaster strikes (referred to in the proposed rule as "extraordinary circumstances") adding 42 C.F.R. 413.33(d)(4). 

According to InsideHealthPolicy, in their article, CMS Proposes New Payment Model For Skilled Nursing Homes describes the changes: "CMS is proposing to overhaul the way Medicare pays nursing homes so as to focus more on each resident’s particular needs and move away from volume-based reimbursements, the agency said in a proposed rule released Friday (April 27). The new payment model would tie payments to patients’ conditions and simplify nursing homes’ reporting requirements...." (a paid subscription is required to read the full article).

 

 

May 1, 2018 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Federal Statutes/Regulations, Health Care/Long Term Care, Medicare | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, April 30, 2018

Bank at the US Post Office?

My brother (thanks big brother-I guess this means you read the blog-yay!) sent me an article published in The Hill with an interesting proposal!  Published on April 26, 2018, The poor need bank accounts, and USPS has the answer highlights a bill introduced by Senator Gillebrand  which would create "provide a public option in basic banking services through the U.S. Postal System."

Why, you may ask, propose that the USPS get into the banking business?  Well, because there is a "persistent problem of widespread financial exclusion, which means a household is either unbanked or underbanked. Recent data shows that 7 percent of households are simply unbanked since they lack a checking or savings account at a bank."  Consider the implications of not having a bank account. If you have to cash a check, where do  you go? "Instead, they have to rely on the predatory alternative financial services, such as payday lenders, check cashing services and the like." 

The article also introduces us to the concept of "underbanked" which means "19.9 percent of American households ... at some point during the year, they rely on high-cost alternative financial services to meet their financial needs. That leaves over one-in-four American households excluded from mainstream financial services."  Although these alternatives may work for those unbanked or underbanked, they are not without costs, both financial and otherwise.

The article discusses reasons why low-income households find themselves in this situation, including a focus on higher-profit activities and closing branches.  So this is where the USPS comes in under the bill.

The Gillibrand bill seeks to address the lack of universal access through the creation of a postal bank. An added bonus of this measure is that it regulates consumer financial protection abuses by making predatory lending practices uncompetitive.

The bill would allow all households to open accounts at the post office, with a $20,000 limit on checking and savings accounts. Further, the bill allows for small-dollar loans capped at $500 at one time.

The rates on these loans are reasonable, with the bill linking the interest rates to the 1-month Treasury bill constant maturity rate, though a low, fixed rate may be preferable.

Through offering financial services at post offices, the bill would provide much of the physical infrastructure needed to counteract the trend of bank-branch closings. The USPS already has the geographic infrastructure to support universal access: a post office in every ZIP code.

The article offers suggestions for services as well as pitfalls. Interesting concept.

April 30, 2018 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Federal Statutes/Regulations, Other | Permalink | Comments (0)