Friday, June 29, 2018

Hidden Costs for States to Take Over Management of Struggling Care Facilities

A newspaper reporter in Pennsylvania, Nicole Brambila, has another interesting article related to law and aging.  She is examining what happens when struggling nursing home operations require intervention to protect existing residents.   Following the collapse of Skyline Healthcare facilities, which had been operating nine nursing homes in Pennsylvania, state authorities found it necessary to step in, and to hire a temporary manager.  Ms. Brambila begins:

The collapse of the nursing home operator caring for about 800 residents in nine Pennsylvania facilities, including one in Berks County, that required the state step in with a temporary manager will cost $475,000, the contract shows.

 

In April, the Pennsylvania Department of Health stepped in with a temporary manager at nine properties operated by Skyline Healthcare LLC over concerns the New Jersey-based company's finances may have put residents at risk.

 

State officials tapped Complete HealthCare Resources, which manages Berks Heim Nursing and Rehab, to step in as temporary managers until buyers could be found. The contract, obtained by the Reading Eagle under Pennsylvania's Right-to-Know Law, ended June 9. New owners purchased the Skyline homes last month, but Complete HealthCare stayed on through the transition.

 

The management fee is paid by fines collected from nursing home facilities.

 

Over the past five years, the state has stepped in more than a dozen times with temporary managers for poor performing nursing homes, at a cost of more than $4.2 million, according to health data provided to the newspaper.

 

The average cost for managing these troubled homes exceeded $335,000.

There is a lot to unpack here, including exactly how a state collects fines from financially defaulting providers.  Other states facing related issues in Skyline operations include Arkansas, Kansas, Nebraska and South Dakota.  According to the article Skyline recently purchased the some of the properties from Golden Living Centers, also the center of controversies, but then turned around and sold its interest 14 months later.

For the full story, read  "Pennsylvania to pay $475,000 for temporary nursing home manager."  Ms. Brambila seems to be carving out an important niche for her investigatory reporting, by focusing on senior issues. She recently wrote an important series on guardians in the Pennsylvania courts, also for the Reading Eagle, as we described here.   

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/elder_law/2018/06/hidden-costs-for-states-to-take-over-management-of-struggling-care-facilities.html

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