Monday, May 14, 2018

Which States Mandate Certification or Licensure of Guardians?

As I have written in a recent post, Maryland has adopted mandatory training for guardians, effective January 1, 2018.  The Administrative Office for the Maryland Courts is rapidly developing educational materials, including an orientation and topic-specific videos.  In-person training programs are also under development, on a county-by-county basis. 

I recently had a great conversation with Attorney Nisa Subasinghe at the AOMC and I was impressed by all her office is accomplishing in a relatively short time, with a pro-active approach to the topic of court-appointed guardians and the use of orientation videos to get the process rolling.  

Nisa also provided links to the new Maryland Rules on mandatory training for guardians:  Md. Rules 10-108, 10.205.1, and 10-304.1.  In addition, these rules refer to  Guidelines for Court-Appointed Guardians of the Person and Property.  Thank you, Nisa! 

The state of Washington also is developing a program for "lay/family (non-professional) guardians training."  

County-by-county training can be a real problem, as I'm realizing in Pennsylvania where we have 67 counties and probably almost that many views on the need for (or best approach to) oversight of guardians.  

Other states have also been active in establishing education and testing for prospective or current guardians.  Several states' programs have been developed following allegations of improper appointments or lack of oversight.  We've highlighted some of these states in recent Elder Law Prof Blog posts, including Arizona, New Mexico, Nevada and Florida.   

A key decision point is whether to mandate certification or licensure only for so-called professional guardians or also for individuals serving as a guardian for a family member or friend, sometimes  described in legislation or court rules as "nonprofessional guardians."   Driven by complaints by family members about perceived high costs, mistakes, or abuse by fee-paid guardians, some states have focused only on professionals, perhaps on the theory they are affecting larger numbers of alleged incapacitated persons.  Other states, such as Maryland, have taken the position that a minimum threshold of education and oversight is appropriate for all persons serving in guardian or conservator roles, including family members. 

The Center for Guardianship Certification (CGC) offers a map showing certain states with mandatory guardianship programs or rules.  As depicted on the map, some states have adopted  CGC certifications as the state standard for approval of "professional" guardians.  In addition, I noticed that CGC has a list (by exam numbers) of the recent results -- pass or fail -- of certification exams conducted by CGC.   

The ABA also has an online chart (March 2018), prepared by attorney Sally Hurme for the ABA Commission on Law and Aging, with additional information about state certification or licensing rules for guardians. 

You can tell there is a lot of movement in this area -- understandably so given reports across the country. As I was preparing this post, I noticed that neither of these two state charts had identified Maryland as one of the mandatory training states and I suspect I'm missing a few more states that have certification programs in the works.  

https://lawprofessors.typepad.com/elder_law/2018/05/which-states-mandate-certification-or-licensure-of-guardians.html

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