Monday, May 14, 2018

Japan Mandates Cognitive Screening For Drivers Over Age 75

As reported by the New York Times, Japan is using mandated screening tools to remove older drivers who are identified as displaying signs of cognitive impairment:

Since 2009, all drivers 75 and older must submit to a test of their cognitive functioning when they renew their licenses, typically once every three years. Under a new traffic law that took effect in March 2017, those who score poorly are sent to a doctor for examination, and if they are found to have dementia, the police can revoke their licenses.

 

More than 33,000 drivers who took the cognitive test last year showed what the police deemed to be signs of cognitive impairment and were ordered to see a doctor. The police revoked just over 1,350 licenses after doctors diagnosed dementia.

For more, including photos of some of the screening tools, plus interesting demographic data about rural Japan, read Japan Moves to Ease Aging Drivers Out of Cars.  

 

 

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/elder_law/2018/05/japan-mandates-cognitive-screening-for-drivers-over-age-75.html

Cognitive Impairment, Current Affairs, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Ethical Issues, International | Permalink

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