Monday, October 30, 2017

The Continuing Need for Objective Advice About Continuing Care and Life Plan Communities

Over the Halloween weekend, I arrived in New Orleans for overlapping annual meetings involving law and aging issues. Whoa! The Big Easy can be a crazy place at this time of the year! Once I recovered from mistaking the annual "Voodoo Festival" at one end of the convention center for the meetings sponsored by LeadingAge and the National Continuing Care Residents Association (NaCCRA) at the other end, I was safely back among friends.  (I suspect a better comedienne than I am could come up with a good "undead" joke here!)

Settling down to work, I participated in half-day NaCCRA brainstorming sessions on Saturday and Sunday.  Members of the NaCCRA board and other community representatives worked to identify potential barriers to growth of this segment of senior housing.  Why is it that there is still so little public understanding of communities that are purpose-designed to meet a wide range of interests, housing and care needs for seniors who are thinking about how best to maximize their lives and their financial investments over the next 10, 15, 20 or more years?

During the Sunday session led by Brad Breeding of MyLifeSite.net, we heard how Brad's experience as a financial planning advisor for his older clients (who were eager for advice on how to evaluate contracts and financial factors when considering communities in North Carolina), led him and a business partner to develop a more nationwide internet platform for comparative information and evaluations.

I first wrote about Brad's concept on this Blog in 2013 when his My LifeSite company was just getting started, and it is exciting to see how far it has come in less than 5 years.  They now offer a searchable data base on over 1,000 continuing care and life plan communities.  Best of all, they have managed to stay remarkably independent and objective in the information they offer, and have both consumer and providers as customers for their information.  They haven't gone down the slippery slope of reselling potential resident information to providers as "leads."  

One audience member, a CCRC resident, who is frustrated about a lack of lawyers in her area with knowledge about the laws governing CCRCs, asked "is there a way to get more 'elder law' attorneys to understand regulations and contracts governing this part of the market so as to be informed advisors for prospective residents seeking objective advice?"

I believe the answer is "yes," particularly if current clients in CCRC-dense areas reach out  to Elder Law Sections of Bar Associations in their states, suggest hot topics, and offer to work together on Continuing Legal Ed programs to develop that expertise.  I know that almost every year at the annual summer 2-day-long Elder Law Institute in Pennsylvania offers breakout sections for lawyers on the latest laws, cases, and regulations affecting individuals in CCRC settings. Indeed, for "future" attorneys I often use CCRC contracts and related issues as teaching tools in my 1L basic Contracts course. 

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/elder_law/2017/10/over-the-halloween-weekend-i-arrived-in-new-orleans-for-three-overlapping-annual-meetings-involving-law-and-aging-issue-onc.html

Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Ethical Issues, Health Care/Long Term Care, Housing, Property Management, State Statutes/Regulations | Permalink

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