Tuesday, September 26, 2017

Rental Housing and Seniors -- the Live-In Care-Giver Problem?

Recently, our law school's Community Law Clinic represented a woman who had been living with her brother for more than a year at his 2-bedroom rental apartment.  The landlord was fully aware of the situation.  Both brother and sister were 70+, and the sister's presence meant that the brother had appropriate assistance, including assistance in paying his bills (and rent!) on time.  However, a few weeks ago the brother was hospitalized on an emergency basis, and then required substantial time in a rehabilitation setting, and may not be able to return to his apartment.  

What's the problem?  When the landlord learned that the brother had been living away from the apartment for several weeks, and was not likely to return, the landlord notified the sister she could not "hold over" and eventually began eviction proceedings against her.  Fortunately, the Clinic was able to use state landlord-tenant law to gain some time for the sister to find alternative housing (and to arrange for her brother's possessions to be moved), but both brother and sister were unhappy with the compelled move.

Lots of lessons here, including the need to read leases carefully to determine what that contract says about second tenants, who aren't on the lease.  In this situation, the landlord's attempted ouster was probably triggered by the sister making a few reasonable "requests" for improvements to the apartment.  The landlord didn't want a "demanding" resident!

The question of "rights" of non-tenant residents happens often in rental housing -- without necessarily being tied to age.  

I was thinking about this when I read a recent New York Times column, which offered an additional legal complication -- New York City's rent control laws, and the needs for "dementia-friendly" housing, that can involve caregivers. See Renting a Second Apartment for a Spouse Under Care. 

 

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/elder_law/2017/09/rental-housing-and-seniors-the-care-giver-problem.html

Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Ethical Issues, Housing, Property Management, State Cases, State Statutes/Regulations | Permalink

Comments

The situation you pose also has an additional issue. The absence of one of the roommates in rehab or a nursing facility may mean a loss of household income to pay the rent (or mortgage).

Posted by: Crystal Francis | Sep 26, 2017 6:55:42 AM

A curious observation: state and federal laws prohibit against the use of adaptive devices or aids for the disabled/handicapped. Service animals, such as dogs, fall under this protection. But. Not "service humans?"

Posted by: jim schuster | Oct 3, 2017 5:25:04 AM

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