Friday, August 11, 2017

An Elevator Emergency System and the Death of an Elderly Man

Here is another tragic news story for a man, age 82, "who had begun showing signs of dementia and would become 'disoriented at times.'"  

On Aug. 2, nearly a month after he went missing, maintenance workers reported to fire authorities a discovery: a decomposed body in an elevator car in the parking garage. The body was soon identified as Komisarchik’s. . . .  

 

At some point on or before July 6, Komisarchik stepped inside the parking garage elevator. For reasons that remain unclear, he struggled to get out.

 

So in an attempt to seek help, Komisarchik pushed the elevator’s emergency button — twice over the course of eight minutes, a Denver Fire Department spokesman told the Denver Post. But no one responded.

 

Electronic records show that the elevator’s emergency alarm was pressed at 9:09 p.m. and 9:17 p.m. on July 6, the day after Komisarchik was last spotted, according to KUSA. Pushing this emergency button should trigger an alert to an elevator monitoring group or the fire department. But during the time Komisarchik was in the elevator, the fire department received no emergency calls from that car, the Denver Post reported.

 

“Something is not right,” Capt. Greg Pixley, a Denver Fire Department spokesman, told the Denver Post.

For more details, read "He pushed an elevator's alarm button but no one came. . . ." from the Washington Post

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/elder_law/2017/08/an-elevator-emergency-system-and-the-death-of-an-elderly-man.html

Cognitive Impairment, Current Affairs, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Ethical Issues | Permalink

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