Tuesday, April 11, 2017

Ability to Make Decisions and Correlation to Elder Mistreatment

The National Center on Elder Abuse released a new research to practice brief on  Decision-Making Ability and Risk of Elder Mistreatment. This is the introduction to the brief:  

There are many factors relevant to decision-making ability of older people including changes in the brain and cognition and social functioning. These changes can result in decision-making impairments that affect an older person’s ability to pay bills, drive, follow recipes, adhere to medication schedules, or refuse medical treatment (Braun & Moye, 2010; IOM, 2015). Decision-making ability may fluctuate at a given point in time (Falk et al., 2014), and while an older person may lack decision-making ability in one area, they may retain it in other areas (Braun & Moye, 2010). Decision-making ability is of special concern for the field of elder mistreatment because impaired decision-making can lead to an increased risk for abuse and exploitation among older people (Spreng et al., 2016). Thus, understanding the many factors relevant to decision-making ability is imperative to reduce risk of abuse and exploitation while maintaining and promoting autonomy among older people.

The 4 page brief covers key terms, explains how cognitive aging and capacity affect decision-making, the differences between medical decisional capacity and financial capacity and risk factors for financial exploitation.   This would be great to use in our classes!

 

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/elder_law/2017/04/ability-to-make-decisions-and-correlation-to-elder-mistreatment.html

Cognitive Impairment, Consumer Information, Crimes, Current Affairs, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship | Permalink

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