Tuesday, March 28, 2017

Pre-Hospice Helps Keep People Home

I'd previously blogged about special EMTs that can help avoid trips to the ER for certain folks near the end of life.  Kaiser Health News recently ran a story about "pre-hospice":  ‘Pre-Hospice’ Saves Money By Keeping People At Home Near The End Of Life. The article explains the problem and one company's solution:

Most aging people would choose to stay home in their last years of life. But for many, it doesn’t work out: They go in and out of hospitals, getting treated for flare-ups of various chronic illnesses. It’s a massive problem that costs the health care system billions of dollars and has galvanized health providers, hospital administrators and policymakers to search for solutions.

Sharp HealthCare, the San Diego health system where [one individual] receives care, has devised a way to fulfill [the patient's] wishes and reduce costs at the same time. It’s a pre-hospice program called Transitions, designed to give elderly patients the care they want at home and keep them out of the hospital.

How does this pre-hospice work? The article explains it. "Social workers and nurses from Sharp regularly visit patients in their homes to explain what they can expect in their final years, help them make end-of-life plans and teach them how to better manage their diseases. Physicians track their health and scrap unnecessary medications. Unlike hospice care, patients don’t need to have a prognosis of six months or less, and they can continue getting curative treatment for their illnesses, not just for symptoms."

The article suggests that the need for pre-hospice programs will only grow in the near future as the Boomers keep growing older and older. But there are obstacles and one in particular is huge. If you guessed money, you'd be right. "[A] huge barrier stands in the way of pre-hospice programs: There is no clear way to pay for them. Health providers typically get paid for office visits and procedures, and hospitals still get reimbursed for patients in their beds. The services provided by home-based palliative care don’t fit that model."

The article discusses the need for and importance of palliative care, other innovations and the catalyst for the pre-hospice program.  Delving into the advantages of the pre-hospice program and how it works for patients.  The article notes that not only will there be an increased need for programs to keep folks at home, in addition to the payment hurdle, there are "not enough trained providers are available. And some doctors are unfamiliar with the approach, and patients may be reluctant, especially those who haven’t clearly been told they have a terminal diagnosis." And, of course, what will Congress do about health insurance, including Medicare.

Stay tuned.

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/elder_law/2017/03/pre-hospice-helps-keep-people-home.html

Advance Directives/End-of-Life, Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Health Care/Long Term Care | Permalink

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