Tuesday, March 14, 2017

2017 Facts & Figures from the Alzheimer's Association

The Alzheimer's Association has released the 2017 Alzheimer's Disease Facts & Figures report. The report offers an updated terminology

That is, the term “Alzheimer’s disease” is now used only in those instances that refer to the underlying disease and/or the entire continuum of the disease. The term “Alzheimer’s dementia” is used to describe those in the dementia stage of the continuum. Thus, in most instances where past editions of the report used “Alzheimer’s disease,” the current edition now  uses “Alzheimer’s dementia.” The data examined are the same and are comparable across years — only the way of describing the affected population has changed. For example, 2016 Alzheimer’s Disease Facts and Figures reported that 5.4 million individuals in the United States had “Alzheimer’s disease.” The 2017 edition reports that 5.5 million individuals have “Alzheimer’s dementia.” These prevalence estimates are comparable: they both identify the number of individuals who are in the dementia stage of Alzheimer’s disease. The only thing that has changed is the term used to describe their condition.

The report contains a lot of good information that would help our students understand dementia and Alzheimer's.  The section on prevalence is sobering. For example, "[a]n estimated 5.5 million Americans of all ages are living with Alzheimer’s dementia in 2017. This number includes an estimated 5.3 million people age 65 and older, and approximately 200,000 individuals under age 65 who have younger-onset Alzheimer’s, though there is greater uncertainty about the younger-onset estimate." (citations omitted). The report also explores the gender, ethnic and racial factors regarding prevalence of Alzheimer's.  The report gives a breakdown by state. There is an amazing amount of critical information in this report.  The report also includes a special report, Alzheimer's Disease: The Next Frontier.

I'm going to make it assigned reading to my students. Be sure to read this. It's important.

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/elder_law/2017/03/2017-facts-figures-from-the-alzheimers-association.html

Cognitive Impairment, Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Health Care/Long Term Care | Permalink

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