Tuesday, January 21, 2014

Geriatric Care Management and Boomers

Recently, a Pennsylvania friend was describing her aging father's situation in one of the sunshine states.  When her father, a widower, began to show signs of diminishing capacity, the adult children discussed options, including moving Dad closer to one of them. But, he liked his retirement spot in the sunshine, had friends, and, in fact, there were more care options where he was living.

Eventually, my friend hired a local geriatric care manager in the sunshine state, with the cost shared by her and two siblings.  In our most recent conversation, my friend described that decision as perhaps the best move the family made.  She said that at first she had a hard time getting her father's facility to accept the fact that they should call the care manager first.  But having an informed person -- an experienced advocate for her father -- in the community has often been essential, as questions arose over insurance, level of care, medications, transfers between facilities, nutrition and whether to hospitalize. My friend still makes regular trips to visit her father, but the local manager meant there were fewer emergency trips.

Geriatric care managers, sometimes called care coordinators, elder care coordinators, or professional care managers, could -- and perhaps should -- be an increasingly important part of planning.  One of the questions about this emerging profession is credentials.  At least two national trade groups exist, including the National Association for Professional Geriatric Care Managers (NAPGCM) and the National Academy of Certified Care Managers (NACCM).

In addition, law firms specializing in elder law frequently offer care management services, often employing non-lawyer professionals as part of the team.

Geriatric care management may be very important to "elder boomers," both as they become seniors caring for their even-more-senior-aged parents, and as future care-needing individuals themselves.  Unfortunately, a big question may be cost.  Medicare and Medicaid -- and most insurance -- does not cover the cost of care management.  As reported by the New York Times a few years ago in "Care Coordination: Too Expensive for Medicare?," attempts to secure public funding for care managers has been stymied by studies that show care management does not necessarily reduce the costs of care. 

Nonetheless, such coordination may be particularly important in a nation where family members often live far apart.  In my friend's situation, she expected the need to last for a couple of years, but in fact, her father is approaching age 98, and the "healthy" relationship between the children, their father and his care coordinator has lasted for more than 10 years. 

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/elder_law/2014/01/geriatric-care-management-and-boomers.html

Cognitive Impairment, Consumer Information, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Ethical Issues, Health Care/Long Term Care, Legal Practice/Practice Management, Medicare | Permalink

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