Wednesday, January 29, 2014

Extending the Reach of CCRCs: Continuing Care at Home

In recent years, a number of operators of Continuing Care Retirement Communities (CCRCs) have adopted the concept of Continuing Care at Home (CCaH) or LifeCare at Home, as a way to expand their client base and utilize existing resources in a cost-effective manner.  This has been especially important since the 2008-10 crash in home sales prevented many seniors from cashing in on accrued equity to finance a move to a CCRC. 

On February 13, Irving Levin Associates is hosting a webinar on Continuing Care at Home, with leaders in the movement speaking on their experiences with this still-new product.  The program will address:

What is the CCaH business model? Can it be a stand-alone business?
What services are offered? What are the member fees?
What are the start-up and operating costs?
What are the challenges?
What is the response from participating seniors?

The hosts advise the program is designed to address the interests of owners, operators and developors of senior housing and long-term care facilities, appraisers, institutional investors bankers, venture capitalists, and others on the industry-side of senior care.  To that list, I would add elder law attorneys -- and law students --  who may be called upon to answer families' questions about this product.

The one and a half hour webinar is scheduled to begin at 1 p.m. Eastern time, with a $50 savings with early registration through January 30. On-line registration is here.

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/elder_law/2014/01/extending-the-reach-of-ccrcs-continuing-care-at-home.html

Health Care/Long Term Care, Housing | Permalink

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Comments

I'm a CCRC resident. I won't be participating in the webinar.... but I hope there will be discussion of how on-campus residents of "refund" communities are reacting to this decision on the part of management. The refundable amount (50%; 70'%, 90% or whatever) is just about always, per the contract, dependent on a new resident coming into a vacated unit. I'm already reading about trends that say babyboomers will be working longer and won't have the asset base and retirement income levels to afford CCRC living. Will extending services beyond campus perimeters be the beginning of making campus life less desirable? Will campuses become JUST AL , SNF and Memory Care centers with less and less independent living? Will residents who permanently move to Health Care or heirs in the case of death wait forever for the promised refund?

Posted by: Jennifer Young | Jan 30, 2014 6:41:48 AM

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