Saturday, March 29, 2008

Not elder law: world's oldest recorded voice will be heard again

An "ethereal" 10 second clip of a woman singing a French folk song has been played for the first time in 150Box years. The recording of "Au Clair de la Lune", recorded in 1860, is thought to be the oldest known recorded human voice.  A phonograph of Thomas Edison singing a children's song in 1877 was previously thought to be the oldest record.  The new "phonautograph", created by etching soot-covered paper, has now been played by US scientists using a "virtual stylus" to read the lines.  "When I first heard the recording as you hear it ... it was magical, so ethereal," audio historian David Giovannoni, who found the recording, told AP."The fact is it's recorded in smoke. The voice is coming out from behind this screen of aural smoke."

Source:  BBC News

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/elder_law/2008/03/not-elder-law-1.html

Other | Permalink

TrackBack URL for this entry:

http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d8341bfae553ef00e55198007e8834

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Not elder law: world's oldest recorded voice will be heard again: