Tuesday, December 3, 2013

Progressive and Conservative Groups Align Around Equal Access to Teachers, While Dept. of Education Goes the Other Way

Cap CaptureThe Center for American Progress has released a new report, Giving Every Student Access to Excellent Teachers, that fits in well with much of the conversation coming from other outlets over the past week or two.  The report offers a summary of why access to excellent teachers is so important, emphasizing that:

Excellent teachers—those in the top 20 percent to 25 percent of the profession in terms of student progress—produce well more than a year of student-learning growth for each year they spend instructing a cohort of students. On average, children with excellent teachers make approximately three times the progress of children who are taught by teachers in the bottom 20 percent to 25 percent. Students who start behind their peers need this level of growth consistently—not just in one out of four classes—to close persistent achievement gaps. Students in the middle of the academic-achievement continuum need it to exceed average growth rates and leap ahead to meet rising global standards.

The report is skeptical of current policies' approach to expanding access to excellent teachers. Current policies "focus intently . . . on boosting the number of excellent teachers in America’s schools" by "recruiting more high achievers into the teaching profession, creating incentives for better teachers to stay in teaching and teach less-advantaged children, and dismissing the least-effective teachers."  But the report concludes that these policies are insufficient in the short term to expand access for the majority of students who need it.  Thus, the report offers four proposals through which the federal government could expand access immediately:

1. Structure competitive grants to induce districts and states to shift to transformative school designs that reach more students with excellent teachers and the teams that these teachers lead. Incentivize innovation by awarding funds to districts and states with strong, sustainable plans to transform staffing models in ways that dramatically expand access to excellent teaching and make the teaching profession substantially more attractive.

2. Reorient existing formula grants to encourage transition to new classroom models that extend the reach of great teachers, both directly and through leading teaching teams. Dramatically improve student outcomes by putting excellent teachers in charge of the learning of all students in financially sustainable ways. By teaching more students directly and leading teams toward excellence, great teachers could take responsibility for all students, not just a fraction of them.

3. Create a focal point for federal research and development efforts. Spur rapid progress by gathering and disseminating evidence on policies and practices that extend the reach of excellent teachers, directly and through team leadership, and accelerate development of best-in-class digital tools.

4. Create and enforce a new civil right to excellent teachers, fueling all districts and states—not just the winners of competitive grants—to make the changes needed to reach all students with excellent teachers and their teams.

Notable in these recommendations is the alignment and misalignment with recent studies and developments.  The report's first recommendation is strikingly similar to the one growing out the Fordham Institute's recent study, Right Sizing Classrooms, that advocates expanding classroom enrollments for strong teachers and shrinking them for weaker ones.  For those who follow the politics of these organizations, the Fordham Institute and the Center for American Progress do not exactly see eye-to-eye.  That they seem to agree on this point is worth noting.

All four of the report's recommendations, and the fourth in particular, run contrary to the Department of Education's announcement last week that it was dropping the requirement of access to effective teachers from the NCLB waiver process.  As noted in my post on the change, the Department is acting contrary to existing statutory requirements, a substantial body of research, and the pleas of civil rights advocates.  Rather than moving backward on access to excellent teachers, the Center for American Progress's new report proposes that this access be statutorily guaranteed as a civil right because it is so fundamental to educational opportunity.

December 3, 2013 in Equity in education, Federal policy, Studies and Reports | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, November 20, 2013

New Study on Right-Sizing Classrooms: Give the Best Teachers the Most Students

Fordham CaptureThe typical discussion about classroom size is about whether to make them smaller for disadvantaged students.  A new study by the Fordham Institute asks a slightly different question and suggests a different approach: within a single school, would it help to assign more students to the best teachers and fewer to the weaker teachers.  The premise of this question is consistent with prior literature that suggested that, generally, the quality of the teacher matters more the the number of students in the class (although that conclusion does not necessarily follow in regard to the most disadvantaged students).  The Fordham Institutes's study concludes that schools can, in fact, maximize achievement and more efficiently marshall their resources by assigning strong teachers to larger classrooms, rather than assigning the same number of students to every teacher's classroom.  

One unanswered question is what the teachers think about this.  

Continue reading

November 20, 2013 in Equity in education, Studies and Reports | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, November 12, 2013

New Study on the Educational Effects on Transferring High Quality Teachers to High Need Schools

One of the reasons why integration is a powerful tool for improving educational outcomes is that it creates equal access to resources.  In a racially and socio-economically stratified education system, the stubborn reality is that the "haves" will almost always out compete the "have-nots" for the best teachers and the "haves" will resist equity policies that interfere with their ability to out compete.  These realities are what make the new study from the Department of Education's Institute for Educational Science on teacher transfers so interesting.  It was able to answer the question of "what if we could get the best teachers to teach in the neediest schools." Prior programs have be relatively ineffective in getting high quality teachers to transfer or seek jobs in high need districts.  Some studies have found that the cost of incentivizing teachers was prohibitively high.

This new study overcomes the incentive problem and founds impressive results.  A pilot program in 10 districts across 7 states identified "[t]he highest-performing teachers in each district—those who ranked in roughly the top 20 percent within their subject and grade span in terms of raising student achievement year after year (an approach known as value added)," and offered them "$20,000, paid in installments over a two-year period, if they transferred into and remained in designated schools that had low average test scores."

The major findings from the study were:

• The transfer incentive successfully attracted high value-added teachers to fill targeted vacancies. Almost 9 out of 10 targeted vacancies (88 percent) were filled by the high-performing teachers who had been identified as candidates eligible for the transfer intervention. To achieve those results, a large pool of high-performing teachers was identified (1,514) relative to the number of vacancies filled (81). The majority of candidates did not attend an information session (68 percent) or complete an online application to participate in the transfer intervention (78 percent).

• The transfer incentive had a positive impact on test scores (math and reading) in targeted elementary classrooms. These impacts were positive in each of the two years after transfer, between 0.10 and 0.25 standard deviations relative to each student’s state norms. This is equivalent to moving up each student by 4 to 10 percentile points relative to all students in their state. In middle schools, we did not find evidence of impacts on student achievement. When we combined the elementary and middle school data, the overall impacts were positive and statistically significant for math in year 1 and year 2, and for reading only in year 2. Our calculations suggest that this transfer incentive intervention in elementary schools would save approximately $13,000 per grade per school compared with the cost of class-size reduction aimed at generating the same size impacts. However, overall cost-effectiveness can vary, depending on a number of factors, such as what happens after the last installments of the incentive are paid out after the second year. We also found there was significant variation in impacts across districts.

• The transfer incentive had a positive impact on teacher-retention rates during the payout period; retention of the high-performing teachers who transferred was similar to their counterparts in the fall immediately after the last payout. We followed teachers during both the period when they were receiving bonus payments and afterward. Retention rates were significantly higher during the payout period—93 versus 70 percent. After the payments stopped, the difference between cumulative retention of the high-performing teachers who transferred


November 12, 2013 in Equity in education, Studies and Reports | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sixty-Seven Percent of College Students Report Being Harassed on Campus

A recent survey of 282 colleges and 44 college administrators found that 67% of students experienced harassment on campus and 61% witnessed another student being harassed.  Those students reported that the harassment had significant effects on their education.  Forty-six percent said harassment caused disappointment with college experience.  Twenty percent said harassment interfered with their concentration in class.  And 23% said harassment caused them to miss class and other campus activities.  Only 17% of students, however, actually reported the harassment to a college officials.  Fifty-five percent of college administrators cite the cause of the low reporting rates as begin poor reporting and enforcement mechanism.  

The survery is not nearly as nuanced as the ones conducted by the American Association of University Women (AAUW), but its results are largely consistent with the AAUW's last report in 2005, Drawing the Line: Sexual Harassment on Campus.  As some may recall, reports of this sort were important in prompting the Supreme Court to extend Title IX liability to schools for on-campus harassment.  Those cases, however, addressed elementary and secondary schools.  Given the different and decentralized context of college campuses,  the problem of higher education harassment does not easily mess with the rules developed for elementary and secondar schools. These persistently high numbers in college suggest a different approach is necessary (not that the problem has been solved in elementary and secondary schools).

November 12, 2013 in Bullying and Harassment, Gender, Studies and Reports | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, November 8, 2013

The Business Case for Racial Equity

A new report by the Altarum Institute and the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, The Business Case for Racial Equity,  details the economic impact of racial inequality and the benefits of advancing racial equity, particularly given the evolving demography of our nation.  It argues, based on economic and social science studies, that increasing racial equity would benefit businesses, government, and the overall economy.  It focuses on housing, education, health and criminal justice as the primary areas of inequality that need to be addressed.  In education, the report posits that school integration, pre-k education, and high expectations for minority students would produce significant benefits.  The arguments and research in regard to each of these education proposals are not new, but the report, unlike most, does bring these three distinct educational reforms together into a single argument about the economy. 


November 8, 2013 in Equity in education, Pre-K Education, Racial Integration and Diversity, Studies and Reports | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, November 6, 2013

Why Bobby Jindal Is Wrong in the DOJ Voucher Battle

In a brief released today, Kevin Welner, Director of the National Education Policy Center, emphasizes what I have argued in several posts regarding the litigation over Louisiana's voucher program: the politics of vouchers are attempting to run roughshod over the basic constitutional doctrines of school desegregation. In a far more detailed way than I could through blog posts, Welner's brief details how this litigation got transformed into "Much Ado about Politics."  The brief's introduction:

explains that Louisiana Gov. Jindal and other opponents either misunderstand or misrepresent the actions of the US Department of Justice, which is attempting to bring Louisiana’s voucher program within the scope of existing law and to avoid predictable harm to children that would occur if their racial isolation were increased. Research evidence does not support claims that vouchers advance educational or civil rights. The evidence does, however, establish that racial isolation is harmful to children and to society. Such racial isolation was not acceptable when Freedom of Choice plans were first proposed in the 1960’s, and it is no more acceptable today. Whereas the goal 45 years ago was to maintain segregation, the goal today is to forcefully push aside concerns about segregation. Neither goal is consistent with core American values.

The full brief is available here.

November 6, 2013 in Racial Integration and Diversity, Studies and Reports | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, October 31, 2013

New Book Debunking Myths About Poor Students

Poverty-bookPaul C. Gorski, associate professor of integrative studies at George Mason University, has published anew book called Reaching and Teaching Students in Poverty: Strategies for Erasing the Opportunity Gap.”  The book focuses on five common stereotypes about poor families and education.  First, poor people do not value education.  Second, poor people are lazy.  Third, poor people are substance abusers.  Fourth, poor people are linguistically deficient and poor communicators.  Fifth, poor people are ineffective and inattentive parents. Gorski points to social science to rebut each of these stereotypes. 

On valuing education, he says this stereotype is an assumption based on less parental involvement at the school building itself by low-income families, but he points out that the inability to be at school is caused by job, transportation, and other barriers poor families face, not a lack of interest.  He says there is no information to infer that they actually value education less.  The laziness stereotype is easily debunked by the fact that many poor families work more hours and jobs than other families.  They just make less money.  On substance abuse, he says data shows that wealthier families actually have a higher rate of alcohol and drug abuse than poor families.  They, of course, also have more money with which to indulge.

The linguistic deficient, however, was the most interesting.  He does not contest that lower income parents may have less formal vocabularies, which also manifests itself in their children’s oral communication.  He does contest that they are less complex or necessarily eqaute to ignorance.  He points to evidence that indicates oral vocabularies are not as closely linked to reading and writing vocabularies as one might think.  In short, a child’s oral linguistics are not a limit on their ability to learn to read.  This makes sense because, after all, reading is new to all kids, regardless of how well they might speak.  Gorski acknowledges that low-income students do tend to start school with fewer reading skills than other students, but he argues this is a function of difference in access to quality pre-k educational opportunities, not necessarily their parents’ communication skills.  His debunking of the bad parent stereotype is largely intertwined with the previous four points.

So why are these stereotypes so prevalent and where do they come from?  Part of it, he says, is our

Continue reading

October 31, 2013 in Equity in education, Scholarship, Studies and Reports | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, October 25, 2013

Three Members of U.S. Equity and Excellence Commission Issue Separate Statement on Charters

David G. Sciarra, James E. Ryan and Randi Weingarten just issued a Compendium Paper to the U.S. Deptarment of Education's Equity and Excellence Commission, which issued its report this past spring.  All three were part of the Commission itself.  Their paper speaks solely to charter schools.  They write:
The number of charter schools is increasing, with growing debate about their proper place in state public education systems. To ensure equity and excellence in those systems, states must create a policy environment built on the expectation that charters will be fully accountable to the public, and operate effectively and equitably in the communities they serve. After all, the states have the responsibility to ensure students the quality education they must have to succeed and are legally entitled to receive, regardless of how the state allows its local schools to be governed. 
In response, they recommend:

• Encouraging innovation, such as giving priority to multi-district charters that seek to serve a socio-economically and racially diverse student body, or that address the needs English language learners or students at-risk of dropping out 

• Ensuring that charter schools are not impeding access, through means explicit or subtle, to any and all students who are eligible to enroll, including very low income students, English language learners, and students with disabilities.

 • Requiring public transparency in the lottery process; in maintaining waiting lists and documenting transfers and attrition; in adhering to state and federal due process in student discipline matters; and by disclosure of annual budgets, including funds and other support received from private sources.

Their full statement is available after the jump.

Continue reading

October 25, 2013 in Charters and Vouchers, Equity in education, Federal policy, Studies and Reports | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, October 24, 2013

New Tool to Assess the Fiscal Effects of Increasing Graduation Rates

Earlier this summer, I posted on a law enforcement analysis of why we should put more money into pre-k education as well a report by the Alliance for Education on the broader fiscal impacts of graduation rates.  The Alliance has now turned its report into an interactive tool that allows viewers to parse out the effects based on local tax revenues, federal tax revenues, lost income, gross domestic product, home sales, jobs etc.  The national effect of increasing our graduation rate to 90% would be to generate an additional $1.3 billion in federal tax revenues and $661 million in state an local taxes off of an additional $8.1 million in additional earnings by the graduates.  I would assume, however, that those numbers would compound over time as the previous year's graduates stay in the market and are followed by new cohorts each year.  It is not clear whether that effect is already cooked into the Alliance's data.  If not, it needs to be.  Regardless, the harder question is how much it would cost to increase our graduation rates to 90%.  Right now, the federal government spends about $15 billion on primary and secondary schools (excluding the one time Race to the Top grants).  Thus, the assumed additional tax gains would cover only about a 10% increase in federal education spending, although based on law enforcement's report, we might be able to double federal spending on education if we accounted for the savings we would generate from lowered crime and incarceration rates.  But again, is that enough?  Based on my rough sense of costing out studies performed in various states, that would probably get us close.  A national costing-out study performed by DOE would certainly help close that knowledge gap.

The value/fun of this new tool, however, may be its local uses at the state and city level.  I found that South Carolina is missing out on $18 million in taxes and the city of Columbia $3.5 million (based on $194 million and $37 million in additional incomes, respectively).  Those sound like big numbers at the local level, although South Carolina's are proportionally bigger than many other states given how low our current graduation rates are.

October 24, 2013 in Federal policy, School Funding, Studies and Reports | Permalink | Comments (0)

State Laws' Effects on Charter Growth

Below is a picture taken of a Standord CREDO presentation.  I have tried to find the underlying report on CREDO's website, but maybe it is still in the works.  (If anyone knows better, please contact me). My interpretation of the slide is that, contrary to common beliefs, legal restrictions on charter schools are not necessarily a cause of slowed growth.  For instance, the first row indicates that charter school growth is the slowest in states that never had a cap on them to begin with.  And the greatest growth is in places where there has always been a cap.  Similar patterns pop up in the other rows.  One might surmise then that restrictions on charter schools serve as political lightening rods, against which charter advocates react and which potentially causes greater growth. Let's hope a report is forthcoming that provides more clarity.

Charter growth BXMx9A4CcAAKZ7q


October 24, 2013 in Charters and Vouchers, Studies and Reports | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, October 21, 2013

New Report on Increasing Poverty in Schools Offers Wake-Up Call

The Southern Education Foundation's new report, A New Majority: Low Income Students in the South and the Nation, is mind-boggling in its implications for the future of educational equity, educational quality, and integration.  We have long known of the suburban-urban divide that stalled integration decades ago, as well as the flight of families with means to private schools.  This new report shows that things have gotten worse, really  worse.  Throughout the south and much of the west, poor students are now the majority of enrolled students statewide.  In Mississippi, an eye-popping 71% of public school students are poor.  The north and midwest are still majority middle income, but only on a statewide basis.  Thirty-eight of 50 states' city schools are majority poor. 

This is a new phenomenon.  It was not until 2007 that the south's schools become majority poor.  The south and other states only crossed over into this territory as a result of enormous growth in poor students between 2001 and 2011.  The south saw 33% growth in poor students, the west 31%, the midwest 40% and the northeast 21%.  School funding has been woeful during this same period.  As SEF's chart below reveals, the northeast is the only place where funding has kept pace with with the growth in the percentage of poor students (although this is not to say it has grown enough there either).


Based on these findings, I see four enormous problems.  First, meaningful integration has become even less possible than before.  If one accepts the dominant social science findings of the past several decades that attending a middle income school is a major predictor of success, these crucially import schools and districts are disappearing. In other words, there are fewer and fewer people with whom to integrate.  Second, the political pressure against integration and for neighborhood schools is going to mount among those middle income families that remain. Although not often talked about, one of the key events in Wake County, North Carolina in the past few years was that it became majority poor.  Thus, it is no surprise that this district, which had a long commitment to integration, has seen enormous tensions and took steps to undo integration. In short, Tea Partiers may have flamed the fire in Wake County, but tipping over into a majority poor district started the fire.

Third, funding for schools just became a lot more problematic because the important political base that would otherwise support it is no longer a majority.  It has bled off into private schools and wants vouchers and tax breaks, both of which have seen rapid growth in just the past few years. Moreover, another significant chunk of middle income families has left or may leave for charter schools in hopes of isolating themselves at public expense.  Either way, support for the traditional public school is in serious jeopardy.  

Fourth, the public schools got dumped into a deep hole over the past decade.  Most research indicates that poor children require 40% more funding than middle income children to receive an adequate education.  Even if we assumed that 2001 levels of funding were adequate, the growth in funding since then has been insufficient to cover the cost of the additional poor children entering public school.  But, of course, funding was not adequate in many, if not most, districts in 2001. Thus, school funding has gone from bad to awful.

I wish I could offer constructive thoughts on the way forward, but this report is just too much at the moment. It calls for nothing short of serious, crisis mode conversations about our commitment to public education that very few leaders are willing to have.  After all, their constituents are already pursuing other options.  A change of course will only occur if they take this report as seriously as I do.

October 21, 2013 in Racial Integration and Diversity, School Funding, Studies and Reports | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, October 18, 2013

New Pre-K Study Emphasizes Long-term Positive Effects on Graduation, Employment and Criminal Behavior

PrekCaptureThe Society for Research in Child Development just released its new report, Investing in Our Future: The Evidence Base on Preschool Education.  The report does not offer any striking new findings, but it does an excellent job of presenting pre-k research in a very reader-friendly manner. Reader-friendliness, however, was not the enemy of nuance.  The report focuses on specific studies and specific limitations.  For instance, it indicates that, while pre-k produces impressive short-term academic improvements in math, literacy and language, studies often find the gains fading across time in later grades, at least as measured by standardized tests. This problem has been used by opponents to argue that pre-k is not a good investment.  The report provides a powerful rejoinder.  

First, the fact that initial gains do not always show up on later tests does not mean that the gains are lost.  It may mean that the gains are not being properly measured.  Later standardized tests may be testing student knowledge differently or later schools have moved to a different method of instruction and curriculum.  Even if the tests were valid measures of learning, which many question, I would say that different methodologies and tests are both are highly possible explanations for the purported "fading of pre-k gains," particularly given the constant churn in tests and standards in recent decades.  

Second, the hypothesis of the first point is strongly supported by the fact that students who were in pre-k programs do show significant educational and life outcomes on measures other than standardized tests:

We do not fully understand why the gains of pre-k appear to fade in later grades, but it programs also produced striking results for criminal behavior; fully 60-70% of the dollar-value of the benefits to society generated by Perry Preschool come from impacts in reducing criminal behavior. In Abecedarian, the Investing in Our Future: The Evidence Base on Preschool Education treatment group’s rate of felony convictions or incarceration by age 21 is fully one-third below that of the control group. Other effects included reductions in teen pregnancy in both studies for treatment group members and reductions in tobacco use for treatment group members in Abecedarian.

Added to this impressive criminal justice, pregnancy, and tobacco results are positive effects on high school graduation and employment after high school.  The study also points out that, whatever might be said of pre-k in general, it has the strongest impact on the neediest students.

October 18, 2013 in Pre-K Education, Studies and Reports | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, October 16, 2013

Moody's Investment Research Says Charter Schools Put School Districts' Credit Rating at Risk

In Charter Schools, Vouchers, and the Public Good, I raised the problem of some districts' continuing financial viability with the growth of charter schools (along with several other issues). I don't suggest that charters are a per se threat to public schools, but focus on the paradigm cases of a small rural district that operates one middle school and one high school.  Opening one charter school can jeopardize the fiscal stability of the district and create dilemmas of conscious for families.  The same type of problem can occur in large school districts, but the growth of charters has to been rather significant.

A new report by Moody's indicates that some districts have already reached this point and others may do so in the future:

The dramatic rise in charter school enrollments over the past decade is likely to create negative credit pressure on school districts in economically weak urban areas. . . . Charter schools tend to proliferate in areas where school districts already show a degree of underlying economic and demographic stress. . . .

"While the vast majority of traditional public districts are managing through the rise of charter schools without a negative credit impact, a small but growing number face financial stress due to the movement of students to charters.". . .

Charter schools can pull students and revenues away from districts faster than the districts can reduce their costs, says Moody's. As some of these districts trim costs to balance out declining revenues, cuts in programs and services will further drive students to seek alternative institutions including charter schools.

Continue reading

October 16, 2013 in Charters and Vouchers, Studies and Reports | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, October 14, 2013

New Tool to Compare Education Spending, Student Achievement, Teacher Salaries, and Classroom Size

Edsource.org recently released an interactive website that allows users to compare various major education metrics against one another (per pupil expenditures, teach salaries, student-to-teacher ratios, NAEP scores, etc.).  It also compares the states against one another on scatter-plots and line graphs.  Users can also track changes in the data across four decades.  It is an incredibly powerful and efficient tool for those looking for basic data calculations and comparisons. It may be the most user friendly I have seen.  For that reason, I am sure students will love it.

With that said, some of the underlying data calculations are relatively simplistic and do not fully account for geographic costs, student need, and other relavant local factors (although there is a per-capita income versus local spending chart).  In this respect, the data can be misleading to the average observer.  The most sophisticated analysis of school funding continues to be the Education Law Center and Rutgers Graduate School of Education's reports.  Edsource.org, however, covers broader categories of data and, thus, using the ELC/RGSE reports in conjunction with this website could be helpful.

October 14, 2013 in School Funding, Studies and Reports | Permalink | Comments (0)

The Growth of Hypersegregated Schools in New Jersey and the Legal Implications

Friday, the UCLA Civil Rights Project and the Institute on Education Law and Policy at Rutgers University-Newark  jointly released two reports on school segregation in New Jersey.  The first by the Civil Rights Project tracks racial imbalance in New Jersey's schools from 1989 to 2010, finding increasing levels of imbalance over time.  The second report by the Institute on Education Law focuses on the most heavily segregated schools in the state.  It finds several urban areas in the state with schools that "enroll virtually no white students but have a high concentration of poor children."  These schools, however, "are located in close proximity to overwhelmingly white suburban school districts with virtually no poor students."

This second report, unlike many of the past, goes one step further to analyze the legal implications of this hyper segregation, arguing that it violates the state's constitution.  New Jersey's education clause is one of the strongest in the nation and has been used in the Abbott v. Burke litigation to ensure one of if not the highest funded and most progressive school finance formulas in the country.  Less tested is the state constitution's prohibition on segregation.  For years, scholars have suggested that New Jersey would make a good state to replicate the strategy of Sheff v. O'Neill, in which the Connecticut Supreme Court held that its state constitution prohibited school segregation, even where the segregation was unintentional. 

These two reports should turn up the heat on the state by focusing on it specifically and suggesting a legal battle may be coming.

October 14, 2013 in Racial Integration and Diversity, Studies and Reports | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, October 7, 2013

The Effect of High Stakes Testing on Graduation and Incarceration

This summer Olesya Baker and Kevin Lang released a study through the National Bureau of Economic Research that analyzes the effect that high stakes testing has had on graduation rates, employment and incarceration.  The study found that high stakes testing had a negative effect on graduation, but that the effect was minimal and potential only transitory during the period of high stakes testing implementation. The study found no effect on employment outcomes.  The major finding of the study was "a robust adverse effect of standards-based exams on the institutionalization rate."  High stakes exams "increase incarceration" by "about 12.5 percent."  The National Education Association and the Congressional Black Caucus are also pressing this line of argument as a critique of current federal policy and the school-house-to-prison pipeline.  Also of concern is the fact that low test scores are now also being used to create "parent triggers," whereby parents can transfer their children out of a school, which tends to adversely affect the school and community they leave.

October 7, 2013 in Discipline, Equity in education, Federal policy, Studies and Reports | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, October 4, 2013

Reducing Teacher and Student Dropout Rates

Reduce disc Capture

South Carolina Appleseed just released its report on teacher and student dropouts in the state. It begins with an alarming assessment from Education Week: "Public high schools in South Carolina graduate on 61.7 percent of their students.  This is 12 percent less than the national average and 26 percent less than the state's federally-defined graduation performance goal."  The report attributes the state's dropout problem to its harsh approach to student discipline.  State statutes, for instance, include standards that authorize the expulsion of students based on vague and relatively minor misbehavior.  The report's proposed solutions are directed at parents, school officials and employees, and the state legislature.  As to the legislature, the report recommends:

The legislature must repeal or significantly amend the “Disturbing Schools” statute to remove the current catch-all wording that permits the arrest of students for any number of typical misbehaviors, including “acting obnoxiously.”

The legislature must amend state law so that school boards do not have the discretion to expel a student for vague infractions, such as “gross misbehavior,” “persistent disobedience” or “other acts as determined by local school authorities.”

School districts should be required to disaggregate and report data by school on suspensions, expulsions and criminal charges against students. This information should include the duration of each exclusion from school and the reason for the discipline. Districts also should be required to report the number of students readmitted to school after the end of their punishment.

The report is South Carolina specific, but these recommendations would be good medicine for most other states as well.  It also includes a good overview of the current research on positive behavioral interventions and supports.  

October 4, 2013 in Discipline, Studies and Reports | Permalink | Comments (0)

More Districts Offer Free School Meals to Students and Must Find New Ways to Count Low-Income Students

School districts around the country are making free school breakfasts and lunches available to all students in a continuing rollout of changes to eligibility requirements by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). The USDA eliminated the requirement for family income-eligibility surveys for free and reduced-price meals for the 2013-2014 school year. (No link to the USDA’s website is available because of the federal government shutdown.) In a report released this week by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, the Center said that “[m]ore than 2,200 high-poverty schools serving nearly 1 million children in seven states — one in ten children across these states — operated under community eligibility during the 2012-2013 school year.” Under the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010, a  “community eligibility option” allows schools in high-poverty areas to offer breakfast and lunch free to all students at no charge. On Wednesday, official from the Dallas Independent School District called the move “a wonderful benefit” as it will help ensure that students are not hungry during the school day and eliminate the paperwork that districts have to complete for meals eligibility. However, eliminating eligibility surveys does have a downside—districts used free- and reduced-price lunch data to Title I aid and measure accountability testing under No Child Left Behind Act for schools that serve low-income students. In a 2002 “Dear Colleague” letter, the ED approved of using school lunch program data to disaggregate student assessment scores, for “student eligibility for supplemental educational services, and under certain circumstances, in prioritizing opportunities for public school choice.” Now that the USDA surveys are no longer required, districts will have to find new ways to identify low-income students for those purposes. The ED offered guidance for districts to gather data in a 2012 policy letter here.

October 4, 2013 in Federal policy, K-12, Studies and Reports | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, September 30, 2013

Charter School Performance in Perspective

Priscilla Wohlstetter, Joanna Smith, and Caitlin C. Farrell have published In Choices and Challenges: Charter School Performance in Perspective (Harvard Education Press, 2013).  The book analyzes more than 400 journal articles and think-tank papers regarding charter school innovation, student performance, accountability outcomes, competition and more.

Cribbing from the press release:

On student achievement, which Wohlstetter calls the “lightning-rod issue,” she says “the-big finding that continues to hold up in state after state” is that “charter schools are over-represented at both the higher and lower ends of student achievement.”  Which raises the policy question: “Why are we not replicating schools at the high end, and why are authorizers not closing down schools at the low end?”

On the question of how charter schools use their autonomy, the answer seems to be: not much and not terribly well.

Continue reading

September 30, 2013 in Charters and Vouchers, Scholarship, Studies and Reports | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, September 24, 2013

The State of Exclusion

UNC imageThe UNC Center for Civil Rights has launched a multi-year Inclusion Project Project, "which is dedicated to understanding, documenting, and addressing the persistent and related impacts of the legacy of residential segregation."  It will analyze the effects of residential segregation on public education, municipal underbounding, and environmental racism.  The Center's first report, The State of Exclusion, is now available.  In addition to housing opportunity and environmental hazard exposure, the report offers a sophisticated empirical analysis of each of North Carolina's communities and shows the disparities in access to racially integrated schools, middle income schools and high performing schools.

September 24, 2013 in Racial Integration and Diversity, Studies and Reports | Permalink | Comments (0)