Monday, July 28, 2014

The Higher Education Act at 50: Call for Papers

AALS Section on Education Law Call for Papers, January 2015 Annual Meeting, Washington, DC

The Section on Education Law of the Association of American Law Schools issues this call for papers in connection with its program at the AALS annual meeting Jan. 2nd-5th, 2015 in Washington, DC. The program topic is “The Higher Education Act at 50.”

When President Lyndon Johnson signed the Higher Education Act in San Marcos, TX on November 8, 1965, he said to the assembled crowd, “And when you look into the faces of your students and your children and your grandchildren, tell them that you were there when it began. Tell them that a promise has been made to them. Tell them that the leadership of your country believes it is the obligation of your Nation to provide and permit and assist every child born in these borders to receive all the education that he can take.” This Program will take stock of that promise on the fiftieth anniversary of its making. A distinguished panel of higher education law professors and policy makers, to include Professor Michael Olivas of the University of Houston Law Center, Professor Philip Schrag of Georgetown University Law Center, and Catherine Lhamon, the Assistant Secretary of Education for the Office for Civil Rights, will consider and discuss the financial, educational, and civil rights aspects of the HEA and its subsequent amendments as we move into the second half-century of its existence.

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July 28, 2014 in Conferences, Higher education | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, June 6, 2014

Loyola Law Hosts "Education Law: A Year in Review” in Chicago

Loyola_Chicago_Law_School_LogoThe Education Law & Policy Institute at Loyola University School of Law will present its seminar, “Education Law:  A Year in Review” on June 25, 2014, from 1-5 p.m. The seminar will address important developments in the area of education law during the past year. Topics to be addressed include recent federal guidance on school discipline, bullying, and sexual violence; best practices in special education due process hearings; and other hot topics in the area of education law. CLE credit is available, and a reception will follow the program. As part of the Civitas ChildLaw Center, the Loyola University Chicago Education Law and Policy Institute is designed for students, faculty, judges, practitioners, business leaders and policy makers who strive to serve the educational needs of children through the law. For the full program and to register, click here.

June 6, 2014 in Conferences | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, June 5, 2014

Indiana University Hosts Martha McCarthy Education Law & Policy Summer Institute Next Week

On June 12-13, Indiana University Bloomington's School of Education will host its 47th annual Martha McCarthy Education Law & Policy Summer Institute. The Institute program will include several national speakers in school law including special education, bullying and harassment, and teacher evaluation. More information is available at the conference website here. Tip of the hat to Gina Umpstead at Edjurist for the post.

June 5, 2014 in Conferences | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, May 14, 2014

Conference: Making the American Dream a Reality for Boys and Young Men of Color

JCPES Logo 2012 Medium

Ladders of Opportunity:
Making the American Dream a Reality for Boys and Young Men of Color


Tuesday, June 3, 2014
8:30 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.
(Light refreshments served at 8:30 a.m.)


 National Press Club
529 14th Street, NW, Thirteenth Floor
Washington, DC 20045
 
Please join the American Institutes for Research, the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies and College Bound for a panel discussion about the Obama Administration’s initiative, My Brother’s Keeper.
 
Welcome and Opening Remarks:
The Honorable Ronald V. Dellums
Former Member of Congress
Moderator:
Andrew Ujifusa, State Policy and Politics Reporter, Education Week
Panelists:
Brian D. Smedley, Vice President and Director
Health Policy Institute, Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies
Darren Woodruff, Principal Researcher
Education Program, American Institutes for Research
Kenneth Ward, Executive Director
College Bound
 

President Obama’s My Brother’s Keeper initiative currently is bringing together leading foundations and organizations to design and develop “ladders of opportunity” for boys and young men of color.   Panelists will identify problems and suggest clear recommendations for pressing issues affecting today’s young men of color.
 
Please click on the link to register for this event.  https://www.eventbrite.com/e/making-the-american-dream-a-reality-for-boys-and-young-men-of-color-registration-11546545027?ref=ebtnebtckt

May 14, 2014 in Conferences | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, May 5, 2014

Upcoming Event in D.C.: Sixty Years after Bolling v. Sharpe: Public Education and the D.C. Federal Courts

Logo-3On Thursday, June 19, 2014, from 4:30-6:00, the Historical Society for the District of Columbia Circuit will host the program “Sixty Years after Bolling v. Sharpe: Public Education and the D.C. Federal Courts,” in the ceremonial courtroom in the Prettyman US Courthouse.  From the Society’s announcement:


Major cases such as Carr v. Corning in 1950, which endorsed “separate but equal” schools; Bolling v. Sharpe; Hobson v. Hansen in 1968, where Judge Skelly Wright enjoined “tracking” of students, ordered cross-town transfers, and required faculty integration; and Mills v. Board of Education in 1972, where the District Court held children in D.C. entitled to a free public education regardless of disabilities, have played a critical role in shaping public education in the District of Columbia. Associate Professor Eloise Pasachoff of the Georgetown University Law Center will open the program with stage-setting remarks highlighting the relevant history. This will be followed by a panel discussion moderated by Clinical Professor James Forman, Jr. of the Yale Law School, a former Public Defender in D.C., and co-founder in 1997 of the Maya Angelou Public Charter School.  

Admission is free. A reception will follow the program. Reservations are not required.

May 5, 2014 in Conferences | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, March 20, 2014

The IDEA and Section 504: Current Trends and Challenges for Leading Practitioners in Education and Law

Lehigh University's College of Education is hosting a one-week intensive training on special education law.  The program is designed for special education coordinators, teachers, principals, pyschologists, parents, attorneys and hearing officers.  The program will include presentations by Michael Yudin, nominee for Assistant Secretary of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, U.S. Dept. of Education, and Melody Musgrove, Director of Office of Special Education Programs, U.S. Dept. of Education.  The program flyer is here:   Download Lehigh Sp Ed Law Symposium 2014.

 

 

March 20, 2014 in Conferences, Special Education | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, March 18, 2014

AALS Call for Papers: Dead Upon Birth: The Inter-Generational Cycle of Thwarted Lives in America’s Poorest Neighborhoods

The AALS Section on Children and the Law is has announced a Call for Papers for the AALS 2015 Annual Meeting. The topic is Dead Upon Birth: The Inter-Generational Cycle of Thwarted Lives in America’s Poorest Neighborhoods.

“The D.U.B.” is a nickname southside Chicago residents have given a neighborhood exemplifying a tragic reality in many of this country’s urban and rural areas: Children are born into struggling families in deeply dysfunctional neighborhoods and have little chance for full and flourishing lives. In some parts of America, a boy born today is more likely to end up in prison than college and a girl is more likely to become drug addicted than married. Many parents keep young children in “lockdown” at home when they are not in school, to shield them for as long as possible from gang recruitment and gun crossfire. This panel will discuss the economic, political, and cultural causes of concentrated poverty, crime, and disease and alternative strategies for sparing children from it. Panelists will address, from a child-centered perspective, issues such as “neighborhood effect” on child development, state response to parental incapacity, housing policy, relocation programs, foster care and adoption, inadequate education, school disciplinary policies, access to healthcare, employment opportunities, substance abuse and mental illness, criminal law enforcement and incarceration, and societal responsibility for the circumstances in which children live.

Cynthia Godsoe, Brooklyn Law School, will be moderating the panel, which already includes Elizabeth Bartholet (Harvard Law School), Josh Gupta-Kagan (University of South Carolina School of Law), and James Dwyer (William & Mary School of Law).

The fourth panelist will be selected from the call for papers. There is no formal requirement as to the form or length of proposals. Preference will be given to proposals that are substantially complete and to papers that offer novel scholarly insights on the panel topic. A paper may have already been accepted for publication as long as it will not be published prior to the Annual Meeting. The Section does not have plans to publish the papers, so individual presenters are free to seek their own publishing opportunities.

Deadline: August 15, 2014. Please email submissions, in Word or PDF format, to the Program Committee c/o Jim Dwyer at jgdwye@wm.edu with “CFP submission” in the subject line.

March 18, 2014 in Conferences, Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, February 17, 2014

Assessment Across The Curriculum: Spring Conference for Law Teaching and Learning

Institute law teaching

Assessment Across The Curriculum

The Institute for Law Teaching and Learning has announced its one-day conference for law teachers who are interested in learning about effective techniques for assessing student learning. “Assessment Across the Curriculum”  will take place on Saturday, April 5, 2014, at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock William H. Bowen School of Law in Little Rock, Arkansas. By the end of the conference, participants will have concrete ideas and assessment practices to take back to their students, colleagues, and institutions.

 Conference Content:  Sessions will address topics such as

  • Formative Assessment in Large Classes
  • Classroom Assessment Techniques
  • Using Rubrics for Formative and Summative Assessment
  • Assessing the Ineffable: Professionalism, Judgment, and Teamwork
  • Assessment Techniques for Statutory or Transactional Courses

Details about the conference are available at the Institute for Law Teaching and Learning here and the University of Arkansas at Little Rock William H. Bowen School of Law (ualr.edu/law). 

February 17, 2014 in Conferences | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, February 11, 2014

Education Law Association: Notice of 2014 Meeting and Call for Proposals

The Education Law Association is hosting its annual conference on November 11-15, 2014, in San Diego California.  The topic of the conference is "The Resegregation of Education in America," in celebration of the 60th anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education.  I know the Association is interested in more participation from law faculty and encourages them to submit panel proposals.  The call for panel proposals will remain open until March 1, 2014.  The proposal process is straightforward: a short biographical sketch for each presenter, a title and brief summary of the presentation (not to exceed 25 words), and a 500-750 word description of the proposed session. 

More details on the conference and proposals are available here.

 

February 11, 2014 in Conferences, Racial Integration and Diversity | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, November 8, 2013

Desegregation v. Busing: The Inside Story

The articles from Denver University's symposium on Keyes v. School District No. 1 are now available on westlaw.  The symposium includes articles by Mark Tushnet, Kevin R. Johnson, Michael A. Olivas, Rachel F. Moran,  and Phoebe A. Haddon, as well as memoirs by individuals personally connected to the events in Denver.  While all address interesting topics, Mark Tushnet's keynote address and article,  A Clerk’s-Eye View of Keyes v, School Dsitrict No. 1, 90 Denv. U. L. Rev. 1139 (2013), offer a particularly interesting account of the inner workings of the Court surrounding the case.  Tushnet was clerking for Justice Thurgood Marshall when Keyes was decided.  Relying on his personal experience and other new available materials from the Court, he explores the complexity of the Court's deliberations.  

The story of these internal debates is not entirely new.  Justice Powell's concurrence, for instance, explicitly reveals the depth of his disagreement with the Court.  And, Bob Woodward and Scott Armstrong's book from 1979, The Brethren, also explored some of these divisions.  Tushnet, however, best captures the doctrinal battles occurring on the Court and the personalities behind them.  As he notes, seven out of eight justices found there to be a constitutional violation in Keyes. The fractured decision represented not so much a debate over what to do with Denver, but a fight over what Keyes would mean for places like Detroit and Boston.  

Although not explicit in the opinion, the fight over busing largely drives the Court's final decision.  Powell wanted to reject de jure versus de facto distinctions, but in doing so, he wanted to limit the available desegregation remedies, particularly busing.  The majority wanted to keep busing as a way to affirmatively further integration.  The only way it could get the votes to do that was by drawing a distinction between de facto and de jure segregation.  That distinction would shield many districts from busing, but keep it well alive in throughout the south.

From my perspective , it is not clear that the Court fully appreciated the long term ramifications of its decision.  The Court may have been too caught up in the times, which is understandable, and unsure of the best path in regard to its first northern desegregation case.  Regardless, Keyes is later cited as the foundation for requiring intent to prove a constitutional violation in all racial discrimination cases.  As a result, Keyes drew the line that placed the bulk of racial inequality in all areas of life off-limits.  And while the de jure-de facto distinction may have saved busing in some districts (the evidentiary presumption in the case also became a powerful tool in the south), it created the principle by which to later place significant limits on desegregation.  In effect, Keyes was the beginning of the end for desegregation.

All of the article titles and authors follow the jump.

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November 8, 2013 in Conferences, Racial Integration and Diversity, Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, October 23, 2013

University of Toledo Law Review Symposium this Friday: “From Kindergarten to College: Brainstorming Solutions to Modern Issues in Education Law

The University of Toledo Law Review's annual symposium focuses on education law this Friday in “From Kindergarten to College: Brainstorming Solutions to Modern Issues in Education Law." The symposium is a free, public event at the Law Center McQuade Law Auditorium from 8 a.m. to 4:20 p.m. Cribbed from the event brochure:

Four panels will discuss salient legal issues in education, including the development of modern disability law and the legal requirements of the Individuals With Disabilities Education Act, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and the Americans With Disabilities Act; affirmative action and desegregation; legal issues surrounding school safety; and the successes and failures of the conventional education model and its alternatives. Justice Judith French of the Supreme Court of Ohio, who argued Zelman v. Simmons-Harris, the landmark school voucher case, in the United States Supreme Court while in practice, will deliver the keynote address. The symposium is expected to draw attorneys who practice education, disability and administrative law; state and federal education agency employees; and educators and school administrators.

October 23, 2013 in Conferences | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, September 30, 2013

A New Civil Rights Agenda for American Education: Creating Opportunity in a Stratified Multiracial Nation

Orfield image001

 

The American Educational Research Association is hosting its tenth annual Brown lecture in educational research on October 24th.  Gary Orfield is this year's speaker.  His lecture is titled A New Civil Rights Agenda for American Education: Creating Opportunity in a Stratified Multiracial Nation.  More details here.

 

 

 

 

 

September 30, 2013 in Conferences, Racial Integration and Diversity | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, September 27, 2013

Conference: Where Integration Meets Innovation

On November 8-9, 2013 in Hartford, CT, One Nation Indivisible is hosting a conference titled Where Integration Meets Innovation.  Its focus will be on creating, sustaining, and improving dynamic and diverse public schools.  More information on the conference is available here.

September 27, 2013 in Conferences, Racial Integration and Diversity | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, September 26, 2013

FIU College of Law Hosts “Not on My Watch” Anti-Bullying Summit in October

NOMW-Summit-Cover1
October is National Anti-Bullying Month, and Florida International University (FIU) College of Law is hosting National Voices for Equality, Education and Enlightenment (NVEEE) for the “Not on My Watch” Anti-Bullying Summit on Saturday, October 19. Panelists will include Jane Clementi, mother of Tyler Clementi, a gay teen who ended his life several days after a cyber-bullying incident by jumping off the George Washington Bridge; Cassidy McMillan, Producer and Director of the Award-Winning Documentary “Bullies and Friends;” Trish Behnke and Tracy Fentress, the mothers of 14-yr-old best friends Haylee Fentress and Paige Moravetz, whose double suicide pact due to bullying and harassment shocked the nation; April L. Vance, President and CEO of Advance Project; and Jowharah Sanders, Founder and Executive Director of NVEEE. Middle and high-school students, parents, teachers, administrators, counselors, support staff, faith-based communities, members of the lesbian, gay, bi-sexual and transgendered (LGBT) community, elected officials and policy makers have also been invited. The summit is free and open to the public. It will be held at the Modesto A. Maidique Campus, 11200 S.W 8th Street Miami, FL 33199 from 8:30a.m - 2:30p.m. Registration is required. To register, visit http://tinyurl.com/ksays7q. Click here to see a slideshow about the summit.

September 26, 2013 in Bullying and Harassment, Conferences | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, September 20, 2013

40th Anniversary of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act

Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, a statute that requires accomodations and education plans for students with disabilities across the nation, turns 40 years old next week.  The Department of Education is hosting an event to honor the day.  The details are as follows: 

Celebrating Forty Years of Learning Under Section 504

Please join the U.S. Department of Education for Section 504’s 40th anniversary event, “Forty Years of Learning Under Section 504,” on September 26, 2013. Experts, youth, and leaders in the disability communities of the past, present, and future will join senior Administration officials, including Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, to discuss the importance of Section 504 and help honor its 40th anniversary. The event will emphasize the importance of accommodations, specifically in education, and highlight today’s leaders in the youth disability communities and individuals who worked to help pass the law as youth in the 1970s.

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September 20, 2013 in Conferences, Special Education | Permalink | Comments (0)

DOJ and DOE Briefing on Creating and Supporting Diversity in Higher Education

Please join the U.S. Departments of Education and Justice for a panel discussion, “Creating and Supporting Diversity in Higher Education,” on September 27, 2013 from 9:30-11:00am ET at the U.S. Department of Justice. Higher education leaders will join Catherine E. Lhamon, Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights for the U.S. Department of Education, and Jocelyn Samuels, Acting Assistant Attorney General for Civil Rights for the U.S. Department of Justice, to discuss the importance of creating and supporting diversity on college campuses and the parameters for using in race in admissions as stated by the U.S. Supreme Court in Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin. Martha Kanter, Under Secretary of Education, will deliver opening remarks, and Ada Meloy, General Counsel for the American Council on Education, will moderate the discussion. The event will coincide with the release of a document, “Questions and Answers About Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin,” developed jointly by the Departments.

 

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September 20, 2013 in Conferences, Federal policy, Higher education, Racial Integration and Diversity | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, September 17, 2013

Educational Civil Rights Conference at Penn State and Call for Papers

Penn State’s College of Education will host an interdisciplinary civil rights conference June 6-7, 2014.

The primary goal of the conference is to address the inability of many students of color to access high-quality pre–K through higher education — still uneven for young people from historically marginalized groups and/or in many urban and increasingly in suburban settings. While many policy proposals have focused on access to education, there has been much less attention to racial inequality and segregation in access to P–20 education, even as the percentage of students of color is rapidly increasing. This conference seeks to explore what strategies have been effective in expanding educational opportunities for these students — and how we can implement additional best practices that will ensure equity in public education for the future.

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September 17, 2013 in Conferences | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, August 1, 2013

Office of Special Education Programs Conference Materials Available

The U.S. Office of Special Education is holding its national conference right now, and Jim Gerl at the Special Education Law Blog is live blogging the OSEP conference. Solutions about shutting down the school to prison pipeline is being discussed at the conference, including restorative justice principles. OSEP is making the conference materials available here.

-ld

August 1, 2013 in Conferences, Special Education | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, July 30, 2013

Call for Papers: Deadline Extended

The Section on Education Law of the Association of American Law Schools issues this call for papers in connection with its program at the AALS annual meeting Jan. 2-5, 2014 in New York City. The program topic is “Law and the Education of Students with Disabilities,” and will be co-sponsored by the Section on Disability Law.

Law and the Education of Students with Disabilities

For generations, public schools excluded students with disabilities or shunted them into separate and inadequate programs. In the wake of Brown v. Board of Education, parents of students with disabilities began demanding full and equal educational opportunity for their children. Landmark court cases and legislation followed. In what is now a mature legal regime dominated by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act and other statutory provisions, new challenges have emerged: insuring high achievement, preventing racially segregated placements, dealing with charter schools and other choice initiatives, optimizing inclusive education, and calibrating remedies for denials of appropriate education. A panel of distinguished experts in education and law, including Thomas Hehir of the Harvard Graduate School of Education, Robert Garda of the Loyola University New Orleans School of Law, and Terry Jean Seligmann of the Drexel University School of Law, will address pressing legal issues in the schooling of students with disabilities. One additional speaker will be selected from a call for papers.

The Section on Education Law is now soliciting papers analyzing current legal problems regarding education of students with disabilities. The author of the paper that is selected will be invited to join the panel at the Education Law program in January and will also be offered publication of the paper in the DePaul Journal for Social Justice.

Deadline Date for Submission: September 1, 2013.

Proposal Requirements: Individuals wishing to be considered should submit an abstract of 200-350 words and a draft paper evidencing substantial work towards a final product. Preference will be given to scholarly contributions that offer a novel insight on issues that relate to the program topic. The expectation is that the paper will be completed by January 1, 2014. Submit by email to Prof. Mark C. Weber, DePaul Univ. College of Law, mweber@depaul.edu

Eligibility: Only full-time faculty members of AALS member schools are eligible to submit papers. Faculty at fee-paid schools, foreign, visiting, and adjunct faculty members, and graduate students and fellows are not eligible to submit.

Selection: The paper will be selected by a committee consisting of members of the AALS Section on Education Law. The author of the accepted paper will be offered publication in the DePaul Journal for Social Justice, but the author may publish the paper elsewhere if he or she chooses. All law school panelists will be responsible for paying their annual meeting registration fee and expenses.

July 30, 2013 in Conferences | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, July 8, 2013

Affirmative Action and Fisher: What Now?

 

The Century Foundation is hosting the following event next week:

Affirmative Action and Fisher: What Now?

July 19, 2013 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM at The Century Foundation D.C. Office

1333 H Street, NW, 10th Floor, Washington, D.C. 20005

Save your Seat

Although the U.S. Supreme Court remanded the case of Fisher v. University of Texas to a lower court for further review, the justices laid out a new, tougher, set of rules for using race that require universities first to examine "race-neutral alternatives."  What are the benefits and drawbacks of various options: Providing a leg up to economically disadvantaged students of all races? Admitting students in the top percentage of their high school class, irrespective of test scores?  Creating new partnerships between universities and high schools?  Facilitating transfers from community colleges?  Eliminating legacy preferences for the children of alumni?

FEATURING

Anthony P. Carnevale, Director, Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce

Jennifer Gratz, Founder and CEO, XIV Foundation, and plaintiff in Gratz v. Bollinger

Lani Guinier, Bennett Boskey Professor of Law, Harvard Law School Nancy McDuff, Associate Vice President for Admissions and Enrollment Management, The University of Georgia

Richard D. Kahlenberg, Senior Fellow, The Century Foundation

Nancy McDuff, Associate Vice President for Admissions and Enrollment Management, The University of Georgia

Jamaal Abdul-Alim, contributing writer, Diverse Issues in Higher Education (moderator)

Register here.

    --db

July 8, 2013 in Conferences | Permalink | Comments (0)