Thursday, February 16, 2017

New Data Reveals the Nuances of Segregation in DC Schools and Opportunities to Address It

The Civil Rights Project has released a new report on school segregation in Washington D.C.  The report is particularly interesting because it reveals the ways in which segregation in D.C. is more nuanced than in other major cities like New York and Los Angles.  White enrollment in the D.C. Public Schools is up over the last two decades and its total school enrollment is relatively steady.  In other words, white flight from DC ended some time ago, and has now reversed to some extent. Likewise, overall "private school enrollment has plummeted in spite of tuition vouchers," although white enrollment in private school remains steady.  Public apartheid schools--those with 99%-100% non-white enrollments--have also  dropped significantly.  Ninety percent of African Americans attended an apartheid school in 1992, but that number dropped to 71% by 2013. Yet, notwithstanding those trends, charter schools have seemingly gone in the other direction.  "The charter schools overall have a less diverse and more segregated enrollment than the public schools."  

To be clear, however, segregation in the public schools remains extremely high and the report focus on missed opportunities that could have achieved significant integration in D.C. The report also contrast D.C. to the surrounding districts, noting that across the river Arlington's schools are predominantly white, while "[t]he relatively small Alexandria district showed positive potential by enrolling a balanced number of each racial group: whites (27%), blacks (33%), and Latinos (32%). The segregation level in the district was the lowest among the six immediate metro districts."

Get the full report here.

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/education_law/2017/02/new-data-reveals-the-nuances-of-segregation-in-dc-schools-and-opportunities-to-address-it.html

Racial Integration and Diversity | Permalink

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