Wednesday, April 27, 2016

Parents Allege Money Earmarked for School Integration Was Diverted to Charter Schools; Now They Want It Back

Plaintiffs in St. Louis, Missouri, have filed a very interesting challenge to recent charter funding practices.  They allege that a local sales tax increase earmarked exclusively for desegregation remedies has been diverted to charter schools since 2006.  The tax was originally passed in 1999 as part of a consent agreement in school desegregation case.  The complaint alleges that the tax was properly spent from 1999 to 2006, but in 2006 it began being diverted to charter schools.  The complaint is now asking that those funds be reclaimed for the traditional public schools and desegregation.  As one might imagine, this is creating a huge division between families with students currently attending charters, as the remedy the plaintiffs seek would effectively bankrupt the charter system.

Whatever the merits of the complaint, it highlights another example of the ongoing tensions between creating new funding streams for charter schools at the same time that traditional public schools are being underfunded.  For instance, Pennsylvania's newest charter funding scheme during the recession required local school districts, rather than the state, to reimburse charters, and the state set unreasonably high reimbursement rates. This nearly bankrupted Chester public schools and it caused Philadelphia schools to run significant deficits.  In North Carolina, statutes allowed charter schools to tap into school districts rainy day funds.  This meant that the money that districts saved for long term budget shortfalls could be spent immediately by charters.  For more on the contrasting funding commitment to traditional public schools and charters, see here.

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/education_law/2016/04/parents-allege-money-earmarked-for-school-integration-was-diverted-to-charter-schools-now-they-want-.html

Charters and Vouchers, Racial Integration and Diversity | Permalink

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