Tuesday, June 10, 2014

The Complete Privitization of Public Education in Delaware? Not Yet

The Republican leadership in the Delaware House has introduced legislation that would allow state per pupil expenditures on education to follow the child, even if the student goes to private school. Every state has a funding formula that allots state funds to local school districts based on the number of children they serve.  For each child, the state directs a set amount of funding to the district, typically $7,000  to more than $10,000 per pupil, depending on the state.  The Delaware legislation would allow students to have those funds directed to a private school.  This is distinct from a voucher program, which technically does not draw on the state public education funds and is not tied to per pupil formulas.  Allowing private schools to tap into the state per pupil allotments would be a first.  

From one perspective, the legislation would not entirely revamp the current philosophy of educational choice and funding.  It would create a funding stream analogous to some charter school laws.  Charter schools draw a per pupil allotment from the state and are not part of the traditional public school system.  In addition to a charter, under this bill, students could also go to a private school.

From another perspective, this bill would fundamentally change education in Delaware.  Charters have to be authorized and still operate under some level of state oversight.  This legislation would remove all government oversight and decision making in regard to state per pupil funding outside of public schools. Decisionmaking would be entirely consumer based and, thus, the bill would completely privatize a portion of public education funding.  I have previously warned of the dangers of unregulated public education policies and those that would place public schools in a competitive environment that is per se to their disadvantage, so I won't rehash them here. To the legislation's credit, it does offer one hedge against some of those dangers.  It phases out the applicability of the law for higher income families.

Households with income low enough to qualify for free or reduced-price lunch would receive the same amount as a school district would get to educate their child. For last year, that means $43,568 for a family of four. Families that earn less than 1.5 times that amount would get 75 percent; families than earn between 1.5 times and twice the amount to qualify would get half, and families that earn between 2 and 2.5 times the amount to qualify would get a quarter.

The remainder of that student's allotment would go to their home district as normal.

For those taking the skeptical perspective, take a breath.   The bill was introduced by the minority leadership, not the majority, in the Delaware House.  Even they admit the passage of this bill is a long term project.

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/education_law/2014/06/the-complete-privitization-of-public-education-in-delaware-not-yet.html

Charters and Vouchers, School Funding | Permalink

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