Thursday, February 6, 2014

Lawsuit by NYC Teachers Challenging Discriminatory Impact of Licensing Requirements Moves Forward

The Second Circuit Court of Appeals in Gulino v. Board of Educ. of New York City School Dist. of City of New York, 2014 WL 402286 (2014), affirmed the district court's holding that the school board “'can be subject to Title VII liability for its use of'” the Liberal Arts and Sciences Test (“LAST”) and that the LAST violates Title VII's disparate impact provisions because it was not properly validated."  The district court had also "denied in part the Board's motion to decertify the previously certified class in light of the Supreme Court's intervening decision in Wal–Mart Stores, Inc. v. Dukes, 131 S.Ct. 2541 (2011); and (3) held that the defense to claims of disparate treatment under Title VII recognized in Ricci v. DeStefano, 557 U.S. 557 (2009), does not apply to claims of disparate impact."  The Court of Appeals also affirmed those holdings.  In short, the lawsuit by African American and Latino teachers, challenging the disparate impact that state testing requirements have on them, will move forward, and they can move forward as a class.  This holding is particularly satisfying for plaintiffs' attorneys, in general, given the barriers presented by Wal-mart and Ricci to class action discrimination claims.  This plaintiffs' class survived both.

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/education_law/2014/02/lawsuit-by-nyc-teachers-challenging-discriminatory-impact-of-licensing-requirements-moves-forward.html

Cases, Discrimination | Permalink

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