Thursday, January 9, 2014

Jindal Switches Tactics in Battle Over Louisiana Voucher Program: End Desegregation

The last time we saw activity in the Louisiana voucher case things were deescalating.  My reading of Jindal's comments then was that he was disappointed.  This was a fight with DOJ that he was itching to drag out.  Playing the victim served any number of local and national political ends.  It took him six weeks, but Jindal figured out a way to revive the fight.  Since there was not much more to say about vouchers (because DOJ is only asking for reporting data), Jindal has now moved to terminate the underlying desegregation order altogether.  

The underlying order arose out of a 1976 case, Brumfield v. Dodd decision, in which Louisiana had facilitated white flight out of integrating public schools into segregated private schools--the same concern DOJ has with the current voucher program.  The burden for terminating desegregation orders generally rests with the state, but in an interesting turn, Jindal's argument attempts to flip the burden.  By his reasoning, unless DOJ can show the current program is violation, the state is entitled to terminate the standing order.  As noted in earlier posts, the reason why DOJ has always, at least procedurally, been on the right side of this case is that, once a violation was found (in Brumfield), it is the state that must show its policies do not perpetuate segregation, not the plaintiff who must show that they do.

Given recent history, I am sure there will be something new to report soon.

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/education_law/2014/01/jindal-switches-tactics-in-battle-over-louisiana-voucher-program-end-desegregation.html

Charters and Vouchers, Racial Integration and Diversity | Permalink

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