Monday, January 13, 2014

Eleventh Circuit Upholds Alabama School Finance Scheme Against Charges of Discrimination

Friday, the Eleventh Circuit affirmed the district court's holding in I.L. v. Alabama that the state's school funding was not discriminatory.  The Eleventh Circuit's opinion primarily focuses on issues of jurisdiction and redressibility.  In the final pages of the opinion, the court reaches plaintiffs' central claim: that several provisions of and two amendments to the Alabama Constitution were motivated by discrimination.  In particular, plaintiffs claimed that the caps on education spending and otherwise generally low commitment to education trace back to Alabama's desire to disinvest in education once it realized it would have no choice but to desegregate its schools and their finances.  (Similar claims were also made in a challenge to higher education funding in Knight v. Alabama, 476 F.3d 1219 (11th Cir. 2007)).  The court acknowledged Alabama's sordid history, but indicated it could find no clear error in the the trial court's conclusion that these limitations on education "were a reaction to the increases in property appraisals and assessments mandated by [an earlier case], and the accompanying threat of a tremendous increase in the property taxes paid by land owners."  

This case is unique in its attempt to explicitly link intentional discrimination with dismal school funding.  As of yet, however, no modern plaintiffs have been able to sustain such a claim on a statewide level.  The further in time they are removed from the original "deed" the more skeptical courts tend to become of the claim.

The full opinion is available here.  Thanks to Scott Bauries for alerting me to the opinion.

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/education_law/2014/01/eleventh-circuit-upholds-alabama-school-finance-scheme-against-charges-of-discrimination.html

Discrimination, Racial Integration and Diversity, School Funding | Permalink

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